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161. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 5 > Issue: 2
M. Katherine Tillman “A Rhetoric in Conduct”: The Gentleman of the University and the Gentleman of the Oratory
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Newman’s explicit presentation of the ideal type, “the gentleman,” appears first and foremost in his Oratory papers of 1847 and 1848, and appears only secondarily, and then but partially, four and five years later in his Dublin Discourses of 1852 (The Idea of a University). This essay traces lines of similarity and of difference between these successive portraits and distinguishes both from the attractive, better-known sketch Newman presents as Lord Shaftesbury’s, the “beau ideal” of the man of the world.
162. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 5 > Issue: 2
Patrick J. Fletcher Newman and Natural Theology
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Although the second and third University Discourses in Newman’s Idea of a University are well known for according theology a place in a university education by showing the relationship of theology to the other sciences, this essay points out that Newman was also arguing against the “natural theology” of British thinkers like William Paley, Lord Brougham, Sir Robert Peel, and Bishop Edward Maltby, who maintained that the study of the natural sciences would necessarily lead to religion; Newman objected that this kind of “natural theology” could easily lead to deism or pantheism.
163. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 5 > Issue: 2
Daniel J. Lattier Newman’s Theology and Practice of Fasting as an Anglican
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This essay examines the role that fasting played in Newman’s spirituality as an Anglican: [1] the intellectual, spiritual, and historical factors that led Newman toconcentrate on this ascetical practice; [2] his theology of fasting as it appears in his Parochial and Plain Sermons and his Letters and Diaries; and [3] the role of fasting in his personal spiritual journey.
164. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 5 > Issue: 2
David Delio “Calculated To Undermine Things Established”: Newman’s Fourteenth Oxford University Sermon
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This study depicts Newman’s fourteenth Oxford University Sermon as a creative response to two controversial events in his life: the first involved the Tamworth Reading Room—Newman’s satirical critique of Robert Peel’s view of education and religion; the second concerned his advocacy of the compatibility of Anglican and Roman Catholic doctrines which he articulated in his divisive Tract 90.
165. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 5 > Issue: 2
John Henry Newman “So Long Thy Power Hath Blest Me, Sure It Still Will Lead Me On, O’er Moor and Fen, O’er Crag and Torrent, Till the Night Is Gone...“
166. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 5 > Issue: 2
John Henry Newman: A Brief Chronology
167. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 5 > Issue: 2
Bernadette Waterman Ward Religious Liberty in the University: Reflections on Newman’s Loss and Gain
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This essay—originally a presentation at a symposium on “The Idea of a University in the Third Millennium: Revisiting Newman’s Vision of the Academy” at McNeese State University, Lake Charles, Louisiana, February 15–16, 2008—reflects on intellectual freedom and religious commitment at modern American universities in light of Newman’s novel Loss and Gain.
168. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 5 > Issue: 2
Newman Bibliography and General Resources
169. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 5 > Issue: 2
NEWMAN STUDIES JOURNAL INDEX VOLUMES 1–5
170. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 6 > Issue: 1
John T. Ford Editorial Preface
171. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 6 > Issue: 1
Greg Peters Benedict Of Nursia, John Henry Newman, and the Torrey Honors Institute Of Biola University: An Approach to Christian Learning
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This essay first considers the Benedictine monastic schools and their educational philosophy in relation to the writings of John Henry Newman on education and then provides a comparison with the curriculum at the Torrey Honors Institute of Biola University with particular emphasis on their respective views of Scripture and its use in academic and formational contexts.
172. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 6 > Issue: 1
John Henry Newman A Brief Chronology
173. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 6 > Issue: 1
John T. Ford Avery Cardinal Dulles, S.J. (1918–2008) Parallels with Newman
174. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 6 > Issue: 1
John F. Crosby How the Gospel Encounters Culture in the Catholic University: A Neglected Lesson from John Henry Newman
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This essay—originally a presentation at the annual meeting of the Fellowship of Catholic Scholars, September 28, 2007, in Washington DC—uses the concept of a “power of assimilation” from Newman’s Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine toshow how the Christian intellectual exercises this power in encountering the surrounding non-Christian culture.
175. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 6 > Issue: 1
Kevin Mongrain The Eyes of Faith: Newman’s Critique of Arguments from Design
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This essay examines the theological and rhetorical concerns animating John Henry Newman’s evaluation of efforts to prove the existence of God and/or the truth of Christianity with philosophical arguments about the design of nature. Newman’s complex position on arguments from design ought to be interpreted in light of his broader theological understanding of the challenges posed to the practice of Christian faith in his nineteenth century context. These challenges required that apologetics first and foremost defend the truth of Christianity as a religion of holiness, not as a religion of reasonableness.
176. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 6 > Issue: 1
Matthew Briel John Henry Newman and Luigi Giussani: Similarities in their Conceptions of Reason
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This essay examines some aspects of the conceptions of reason in the thought of Luigi Giussani and John Henry Newman. Although the two writers have different approaches and emphases, their notions of reason display striking complementarities, especially in regard to the complex relationship of the reason and the will, converging probabilities, and the operation of reason in relation to faith (informal inference).
177. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 6 > Issue: 1
Newman Bibliography and General Resources
178. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 6 > Issue: 1
Drew Morgan The Rise and Fall of Newman’s Anglican School: From the Caroline Divines to the Schola Theologorum
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This essay examines Newman’s attention to the theological schools and the great weight he gave to theology as the regulating principle of the entire Church system. The first section examines Newman’s adherence to the Caroline Divines and their influenceupon his Lectures on the Prophetical Office of the Church.The second section considers Newman’s “Preface to the Third Edition of the Via Media” (1877), which presented his expanded vision of the Schola Theologorum, which led to his Christological ecclesiology.A brief conclusion reflects on the contemporary relevance of Newman’s final vision of the Church.
179. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 6 > Issue: 1
James M. Pribek Newman in Twentieth-Century American Literature: Fitzgerald, Lewis, and O’Connor
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This essay traces Newman’s rich legacy in modern American literature in the writings of three prominent American writers of the last century: F. Scott Fitzgerald, who plays off of Newman’s definition of a gentleman in his The Beautiful and Damned (1922); Sinclair Lewis, who connects the figure of Carlyle Vesper to Newman in Gideon Planish (1943); and Flannery O’Connor, who mentioned Newman in four published letters, and whose artistic vision was shaped appreciably by Newman’s Apologia and his Grammar of Assent.
180. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 6 > Issue: 1
Rev. Joseph C. Linck (1964–2008) Church Historian and Newman Scholar