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141. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 22 > Issue: 3
Phil Mullins Preface
142. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 22 > Issue: 3
Marjorie Grene The Personal and the Subjective
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The contrast between the personal and the subjective is a central aspect of Polanyi's argument in Personal Knowledge; this essay examines the way this distinction is developed and offers possible reasons Polanyi has been misunderstood on this point. It also discusses some ambiguities in Polanyi's use of "subjective" and "subjectivity" and comments on the general neglect of Polanyi's work by philosophers.
143. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 22 > Issue: 3
Paul Nagy Philosophy in a Different Voice: Michael Polanyi on Liberty and Liberalism
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Polanyi belongs to a tradition which is neither modernist nor postmodernist, but which affirms speculative philosophy as an alternative to both and as an important form of public discourse. With his origins in the philosophical culture of central Europe, he may well emerge as a bridge between continental and Anglo-American analytic philosophy. He was a moral philosopher in the Aristotelian tradition who anticipated the turn in recent years away from the modern ethics of rules to the classical ethics of virtue. Within this context he espoused a new kind of liberalism and a different understanding of liberty.
144. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 22 > Issue: 3
Ronald L. Hall An Apology for the "Second Edition": A Reply to Gulick's Review Essay
145. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 23 > Issue: 1
John M. Cash The Michael Polanyi Papers In The Department Of Special Collections, University Of Chicago Library
146. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 23 > Issue: 1
Membership Information
147. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 23 > Issue: 1
Submissions for Publication
148. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 23 > Issue: 1
Phil Mullins Preface
149. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 23 > Issue: 1
Information on Electronic Discussion Group
150. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 23 > Issue: 2
Paul Lewis Polanyian Reflections on Embodiment, the Human Genome Initiative and Theological Anthropology
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The Human Genome Initiative represents an ambitious attempt to map the genetic structure of the human species (an estimated 100,00 genes). The project has generated a vast amount of theological and ethical literature, none of which discusses the impact of the project on understandings of embodiment. This gap is surprising since Michael Polanyi and, more recently, feminist thinkers have argued that embodiment is central to human existence. I argue that theologians and scientist can teach one another some important lessons about embodiment by exploring some of the literature produced by the project and the anthropologies of Karl Rahner, Wolfhart Pannenberg, Stanley Hauerwas and James McClendon.
151. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 23 > Issue: 2
Phil Mullins Preface
152. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 23 > Issue: 2
Aaron Milavec Religious Pedagogy From Tender to Twilight Years: Parenting, Mentoring, and Pioneering Discoveries by Religious Masters as Viewed from within Polanyi’s Sociology and Epistemology of Science
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Polanyi broke through the notion that science has a distinct methodology and epistemology which sets it apart from the other cultural disciplines (law, medicine, music). When it came time to address the issues of how Christianity functions, however, Polanyi unfortunately lapsed into romantic notions based upon his own ill-informed and marginal participation in the religious enterprise. By way of addressing this deficiency, my study puts forward seven theses designed to demonstrate that everything which Polanyi put forward regarding the transmission of a scientific heritage through a successive series of apprenticeships can be seen as functioning within the religious enterprise as well. Then, when it comes to the role of masters in pursuing lines of inquiry which sometimes lead to self-transforming acts of discovery, such feats can be understood as defining the function of creative theologians and pastors who both exhibit and transform the tradition in which they dwell. In conclusion, my inquiry will attempt to show that, when Polanyi’s own inadequate assessment of religion is set aside, one comes to a proper understanding as to how religious pedagogy actually functions within the Christian enterprise.
153. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 23 > Issue: 3
C. P. Goodman Polanyi on Liberal Neutrality
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This paper suggests that moral neutrality erodes the liberal practices which sustain a free society. It supports the Polanyian claim that a free society is the political arrangement which is best able to realise universal ideals.
154. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 23 > Issue: 3
Phil Mullins Preface
155. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 23 > Issue: 3
Elaine D. Hocks Dialectic and the “Two Forces of One Power”: Reading Coleridge, Polanyi, and Bakhtin In A New Key
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The focus of this essay is to read the nineteenth-century theories of poet and philosopher Samuel Taylor Coleridge against the twentieth century theories of chemist and philosopher of science Michael Polanyi, and Russian philologist and critic Mikhail Bakhtin, showing their intellectual similarities and contrasts. My purpose in this essay is to redeem Coleridge’s thought for rhetorical theory by linking him to modern thinkers who are respected within the field.
156. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 23 > Issue: 3
Andy F. Sanders Criticism, Contact with Reality and Truth
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Partly in reply to D. Cannon’s critique of my analytical reconstruction of Polanyi’s post-critical theory of knowledge, I argue that there are good reasons for not appropriating Polanyi’s programme of self-identication and the confessional rhetoric which may be derived from it. Arguing that “post-critical”should not be identified with an uncritical dogmatism, I then go on to suggest that the theory of tacit knowing had best be elaborated further by drawingon the work of J. Searle and M. Johnson. Finally, I make use of E. Meek’s account of the notion of “contact with reality”to highlight the Polanyian criteria of truth.
157. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1
Phil Mullins Historical and Textual Notes on H. Richard Niebuhr and Michael Polanyi
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This essay discusses historical data that help establish the time at which the Christian theologian and moral philosopher H. Richard Niebuhr became acquainted with Michael Polanyi’s thought. It also briefly examines the ways in which Polanyi’s philosophical ideas are used in the late publications of Niebuhr.
158. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1
Colin Weightman Polanyi and Mathematics, Torrance and Philosophy of Science: A Response to Apczynski’s Review
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The question of how Michael Polanyi understood religious realities has often been debated. I suggest, in this response to a review of my book on Polanyi and theologian Thomas Torrance, that Polanyi's treatment of mathematical realities can throw light on his understanding of religious realities (like “God”) especially since he clearly links or groups these in a number of places. In addition, I point out that Torrance develops and moves beyond the Barthian theological tradition in his adoptin of a Polanyian natural theology.
159. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1
R. Melvin Keiser McCoy on Keiser's Niebuhr: A Post-Critical Dialogue
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I respond to Charles McCoy's criticisms of my view of Niebuhr's theological ethics by arguing that “conversion,” understood as tacit reorientation rather than explicit choice, does accurately depict Niebuhr's 1929 shift in perspective; that “language” emphasized as central to his ethics does in fact hold act and word together; that “praxis,” while not a part of Niebuhr's conscious agenda, is inherent in his idea of response; and that Niebuhr's thought is revolutionary which could and should be developed, but by someone else, into a full-blown postcritical theological ethics.
160. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1
Phil Mullins Preface