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141. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 4 > Issue: 2
Gary B. Selin “The Danger of Accomplishments”
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Newman’s Anglican sermon—“The Danger of Accomplishments”— warned his Oxford audience of the dangers both of higher education and of a life of luxury. Yet how can this sermon’s rejection of flowery literature that entertains and arouses pleasant feelings in its readers be reconciled with Newman’s later advocacy in his The Idea of a University that classical literature is an important aspect of a liberal education?
142. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 4 > Issue: 2
Kevin Mongrain Newman On Theology And Contemplative Receptivity In The Liberal Arts
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This essay—a revised version of a presentation at the Twelfth Annual Conference of the Association for Core Texts and Courses (8 April 2006)—examines the role of theology in liberal education as both a restraint on sophisticated ideologies and as an avenue towards contemplative receptivity.
143. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 4 > Issue: 2
Newman Bibliography and General Resources
144. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 4 > Issue: 2
John Rogers Friday Theology In Balance: The Role Of Theology In Newman’s University And Its Relevance To Contemporary Theologians
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After brief analyses of (1) Newman’s view of knowledge, (2) his view of science, (3) his view of theology as a science, (4) the primacy of the philosophical habit of mind, and (5) the inherent tension within the scientific community, this article relates Newman’s thought to the twenty-first century, particularly the Second Vatican Council’s Gaudium et Spes (Pastoral Constitution on the Church in the World of Today).
145. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 4 > Issue: 2
NINS Update
146. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 4 > Issue: 2
John T. Ford “A Man May Hear a Thousand Lectures, and Read a Thousand Volumes, and be at the End of the Process Very Much Where He Was, as Regards Knowledge. . . . It Must Not be Passively Received, but Actually and Actively Entered Into, Embraced, Mastered.”
147. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 4 > Issue: 2
Newman Chronology
148. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 4 > Issue: 2
David Fleischacker John Henry Newman’s Vision Of The Catholic Medical School
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Though many Newman scholars are aware of the success of the Medical School of the Catholic University in Dublin, less attention has been paid to his philosophical view which undergirded the medical school. This essay examines Newman’s developing “idea” of a university in light of the Medical School, which was not simply to train practitioners of medicine, but also to educate physicians in an awareness of the spiritual truths and values at stake in the practice of medicine and so serve to integrate the body, mind, and heart as well as to provide links between religion and science.
149. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 5 > Issue: 1
John T. Ford “Lead, Kindly Light, Amid The Encircling Gloom”
150. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 5 > Issue: 1
Announcement
151. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 5 > Issue: 1
NINS Update
152. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 5 > Issue: 1
Donald Graham Newman’s Sermon on “The Mystery of the Holy Trinity”: A Response to Richard Whately?
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After discussing the contents of this sermon—which is structured around the Athanasian Creed and emphasizes the inner life of the Trinity—this study raises the question of whether Newman wrote this sermon as a response to the Trinitarian heterodoxy of his one-time mentor, Richard Whately, Anglican Archbishop of Dublin.
153. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 5 > Issue: 1
Newman Chronology
154. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 5 > Issue: 1
Ono Ekeh The Phenomenological Context and Transcendentalism of John Henry Newman and Edmund Husserl
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John Henry Newman has rightly been hailed as a giant in the Catholic intellectual tradition. His contributions to theology, literature, and education have been studied at length; however, his contribution to philosophy has not received appropriate attention. This essay 1) explores Newman’s unique philosophical insights in terms of the phenomenological tradition of Edmund Husserl; 2) analyzes the transcendental approach of certain British scientists—notably Ronald Knox and Charles Darwin; and 3) discusses how Newman might be considered a phenomenologist.
155. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 5 > Issue: 1
John R. Connolly Newman’s Notion of the Indwelling of the Holy Spirit in the Parochial and Plain Sermons
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This essay analyzes Newman’s understanding of the indwelling of the Holy Spirit in his Parochial and Plain Sermons (1825–1843): the nature of the indwelling of the Holy Spirit; the role of the Holy Spirit in regeneration; the appropriation of the indwelling of the Holy Spirit in the Christian through baptism; and the role of the Holy Spirit outside the Church. The final section indicates how some aspects of Newman’s theology of the Holy Spirit are still relevant for the discussion about the Holy Spirit in contemporary Catholic theology.
156. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 5 > Issue: 1
Newman Bibliography and General Resources
157. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 5 > Issue: 1
Thomas Poynor “How Can These Things Be?”: Newman’s Anglican Sermon on “The Christian Mysteries”
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This study considers three aspects of “The Christian Mysteries,” one of Newman’s early Anglican sermons: 1) the use of Scripture in the exposition of the Mysteries of Faith; 2) the definition of Mystery; and 3) the moral effect of Mystery
158. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 5 > Issue: 1
Kevin Mongrain John Henry Newman on Ecclesial Spiritual Life
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This essay is a theological interpretation of John Henry Newman’s 1877 Preface to the third edition of the Via Media of the Anglican Church. Looking at the 1877 Preface through the lens of his earlier Anglican sermons, particularly his Parochial and Plain Sermons, this essay explores Newman’s general pneumatology and its influence on his ecclesiology and considers the spirituality underlying Newman’s Christocentric and Trinitarian vision of the Church as a mutually informing and correcting symbiosis of the spiritual, theological, and hierarchical dimensions of Christian faith.
159. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 5 > Issue: 1
David Delio A “Multitude Of Subtle Influences”: Faith, Reason, and Conversion in Newman’s Thirteenth Oxford University Sermon
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This sermon study begins with reflections about Newman’s frame of mind at the time of his thirteenth University Sermon—“Implicit and Explicit Reason” (1840). For Newman, the time was the beginning of an intellectual and spiritual conversion, while the sermon itself described the powerful interplay of reason and faith in Christian believers and presented the rudiments of an epistemology that would later influencehis An Essay in Aid of a Grammar of Assent (1870).
160. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 5 > Issue: 2
NINS UPDATE