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141. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 19 > Issue: 1
Call For Papers
142. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 19 > Issue: 1
Penelope Ingram Veiled Resistance: Algerian Women And The Resignification Of Patriarchal And Colonial Discourses Of Embodiment
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“Veiled Resistance” explores the relationship between discourse and power through the figure of the veiled woman. Ingram argues that while veiled women historically have been produced as Other in Orientalist discourse, they also have subverted these dominant representations by manipulating the significations of the veil. Using the example of veiling practices employed by Algerian womenduring the Algerian Revolution (1954-1962), as well as the recent actions of Muslim women in Europe who are choosing to defy the law by veiling and, in some cases, re-veiling themselves after a long period without doing so, Ingram examines the veil as a counter-discursive object. While religious, patriarchal, and colonial ideologies attempt to exploit, albeit in different ways, the women’sactions vis-à-vis the veil, these women can be seen to renegotiate the limits of representation through a conscious manipulation of the discourse that has attempted to discipline them and create new possibilities of embodiment.
143. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 19 > Issue: 1
Sally J. Scholz Crimes Against Humanity: A Beginner’s Guide
144. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 19 > Issue: 1
Camisha Russell Thin Skin, Thick Blood: Identity, Stability And The Project Of Black Solidarity
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In this essay I argue for the role of positive, community-based black identities (in the plural) in the creation and maintenance of black solidarity. I argue against Tommie Shelby’s attempts to reduce the notion of black identity as it relates to solidarity from something social or cultural to something entirely political—“thin” black identity. As an alternative, I propose a model for the relationship between “thin” and “thicker” (social or cultural) identities based on Rawls’ contention that the stability of overlapping political consensus isproduced by different groups’ adherence to, rather than denial of, a plurality of comprehensive doctrines. I also discuss the benefits of positive, community-based black identities in terms of “black love” and show why, even if not possessed by each and every black American, such identities are ultimately indispensible to any black solidarity project.
145. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 19 > Issue: 1
Andrew Fitz-Gibbon The New Atheists: The Twilight of Reason and the War on Religion
146. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 19 > Issue: 1
Christian Diehm Troubled Waters: Religion, Ethics, and the Global Water Crisis
147. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 19 > Issue: 1
Gaile Pohlhaus, Jr. Understanding Across Difference And Analogical Reasoning In Simpson’s The Unfinished Project
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In his book The Unfinished Project, Lorenzo Simpson articulates a hermeneutical model for understanding across difference that stresses the importance of analogies. While noting much that is helpful in his account, in this paper I question Simpson’s emphasis on analogical reasoning. After detailing Simpson’s approach, I explore some problems with analogies as a route to understanding. I examine some assumptions behind the idea that one must analogize from what one already understands in order to expand thatunderstanding. In particular I argue that, while in some cases it can be helpful, it is not necessary to use analogies in order to understand another who does not share one’s social position, culture, or worldview, and, perhaps more importantly, it is never sufficient. Moreover, attempting to locate correspondences between oneself and another may in some cases undermine the ability toform the kind of practical relationship that understanding across difference requires. Understanding another is best described, not as requiring analogies between self and other, but rather as requiring a practical relation, a type of relation that I will detail further in the second half of this paper.
148. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 19 > Issue: 1
Mark W. Westmoreland Witness to Dispossession: The Vocation of a Post-modern Theologian
149. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 19 > Issue: 1
Mary Jo Iozzio Jean Vanier: Essential Writings
150. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 19 > Issue: 2
David M. Barnes Who Would Jesus Kill? War, Peace and the Christian Tradition
151. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 19 > Issue: 2
Joseph Betz We Who Dared to Say No to War: American Antiwar Writing from 1812 to Now
152. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 19 > Issue: 2
Daniel R. Gilbert, Jr. Setting Our Sights On Sites: Putting Competition To Work For Liberal Education
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Competition, an experience that human beings construct, is also a challenging concept to teach in a liberal education curriculum. Liberal education is, among other things, a celebration of what imaginative human beings can accomplish together with their differences and their common ground in sight. It is not self-evident, however, that such an ethic of connection, tolerance, and civility canencompass competition. Competition often unfolds as a divisive human experience. Divisiveness among certain human interests is a bedrock premise in the disciplines of economics and strategic management. Frequently, one or both of these disciplines can be found in an undergraduate curriculum alongside liberal education initiatives. The ethical aspirations that we hold for liberal education could be undermined by two disciplines in our very midst.This paper contains a defense of a curricular remedy for this threat to liberal education. With a focus on places, or sites, I create a framework with which we liberal educators can reinterpret competition as the routine practice of an ethic of connection, tolerance, and civility. This focus on sites is augmented when we set our sights photographically on places where competitors necessarily get along with one another. By re-conceiving competition in terms of the places and the sites of human togetherness, I render avoidable the intellectual disconnection between an ethics of liberal education and the divisive concept of competition. We liberal educators can claim competition-intensity, wins and losses, and all-for our educational enterprise.
153. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 19 > Issue: 2
Richard W. Miller Pro-life Moral Principles and Pro-life Strategies: Expanding the Catholic Imagination and Response to Abortion
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There has been a conflation by many Catholics of the Church's pro-life teaching with the strategy of overturning Roe v. Wade. In this paper, I argue that there are other ways for Catholics to think about and respond to the tragedy of abortion. First, I argue that there are serious limitations to the present legal strategy of overturning Roe. Second, I tum to social scientific data to describe the conditions that lead to abortions. Third, I argue that the Catholic strategy should be mindful of the limits of the present legal strategy and should bedeveloped in accord with what the social scientific data reveals. Finally, since the multiple factors that lead to abortions demand a complex multi-faceted response, I suggest some ways Catholics should respond to the abortion problem within the Church and the wider political sphere.
154. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 19 > Issue: 2
Virginia Held Political Solidarity
155. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 19 > Issue: 2
Danielle Poe Mothers' Civil Disobedience
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"Mothers' Civil Disobedience"In this paper, I consider how the nonviolent civil disobedience of Molly Rush and Cindy Sheehan reflect the inherent ambiguity of mothering in a militaristic society. First, if a mother says nothing and does nothing about the pervasive militarism in society the very lives of her children (as well as other children) are at risk. But, if a mother speaks out against militarism or commits an act of civil disobedience, she risks scorn and imprisonment that can interfere with, or make impossible much of the work of mothering. Second, part of mothering involves raising children to be socially acceptable, but in a militaristic society that which is socially acceptable is morally unacceptable. Rush and Sheehan use their particular context to successfully challenge U.S. militarism through non-violentcivil disobedience.
156. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 19 > Issue: 2
Daniel Dombrowski Christian Tradition and the Practice of Justice
157. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 19 > Issue: 2
Valerie Lesniak A Monk in the Inner City: The ABCs of a Spiritual Journey
158. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 19 > Issue: 2
Notes On Contributors
159. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 19 > Issue: 2
Gregory S. Gordon JFK and the Unspeakable--Why He Died & Why It Matters
160. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 19 > Issue: 2
Andrew Fitz-Gibbon The Praxis of Nonviolence and the Care of Children Who Have Been Victims of Violence
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This paper is a reflection on a personal journey toward nonviolence, and looks particularly at the nonviolent care of children who have been victims of emotional, sexual and physical violence. It analyzes the philosophical threads of praxis, nonviolence and how moral sense is shaped through a triad of affective, reflective and elective experience. It concludes with a MacIntyrean perspective relating to the conjoining of theory and practice in the formation of a robust nonviolent praxis.