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141. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 2
Robert J. Batule A Plea for Purity
142. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 2
Robert J. Batule Being Right
143. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 2
Stratford Caldecott Heart of the World, Center of the Church: Communio Ecclesiology, Liberalism, and Liberation
144. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 2
George P. Graham Flawed Expectations: The Reception of the Catechism of the Catholic Church
145. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 2
R.A. Herrera The Last Crusade
146. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 2
Vincent J. McNamara Donoso Cortes: Cassandra of the Age
147. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 2
Stephen M. Krason Orestes Brownson: Selected Political Essays
148. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 2
Stephen M. Krason "A Civilization of Love" Beginning with and Including Catholic Institutions and Organizations
149. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 2
Patrick Foley The Documentation Section
150. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 2
Robert Johnson-Lally Diocesan Archives: A View of the Archives of the Archdiocese of Boston
151. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 2
Kenneth L. Grasso Bibliography of Father Francis Canavan, S.J.
152. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 2
Patrick Foley In Memoriam, Frederick D. Wilhelmsen: One Year Later
153. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 2
Statement of the Society of Catholic Social Scientists to the United States Catholic Bishops Regarding the Proposed Document '"Ex Corde Ecclesiae: An Application to the United States"
154. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 2
1996 Society of Catholic Social Scientists Annual Convention Schedule
155. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 2
Announcements and Comments
156. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 2
Statement of the Society of Catholic Social Scientists to the United States Catholic Bishops Regarding Cases on Assisted Suicide before the United States Supreme Court
157. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 2
Warren H. Carroll In Memoriam: L. Brent Bozell
158. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 20
Elmar Nass A Christian Theory of Leadership Ethics
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There are libraries full of narrative guides based on practical experience and tips for good leadership. The mere recognition of man as the center of personnel management is insufficient to arrange and evaluate a theory’s ethical content. The first concern of this article will be the disclosure of the fundamental values currently underlying contemporary management models and the assessment of their ethical quality. The second concern of the article will be to show a coherent deductive approach from a Catholic point of view. A Christian theory of leadership ethics is developed starting from its source of values up to strategic entrepreneur decisions. Its merit is to suggest a conclusive Christian orientation for the assessment of codes of ethics and leadership cultures in enterprises, that, as an end in itself, clearly and plausibly places man at its center.
159. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 20
Mark D. Popowski The Political Thought of Frederick D. Wilhelmsen
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It is uncommon, especially in the United States of America (the vanguard of our democratic age), for people to oppose the supposed sanctity of democratic government--American Catholics included. They have tended toward, especially during the Cold War, the long-held evangelical Protestant view that democracy was God’s system (or at least was compatible with Catholicism). The Roman Catholic philosopher and public intellectual Frederick D. Wilhelmsen (1923-1996) lamented this liberal-democratic consensus; for him, American democracy was potentially anti-Christian, incompatible with the Kingship of Christ, in that ultimate authority in the social order tended to reside in the people, not Christ.
160. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 20
Marc V. Rugani "Whose Justice? Which Rationality?" in Catholic Debates on a Living Wage: John A. Ryan’s Canons of Distributive Justice as Locus of Contested Traditions of Enquiry
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By applying Alasdair MacIntyre’s framework of rival traditions of rationality analogically to Catholic theologians and economists, this paper argues that these two groups can greatly benefit from a reexamination and appropriation of John A. Ryan’s insights when engaging debate on wage justice today, first by understanding the tradition out of which the Catholic Church established its rationale for justice regarding wages, and second by applying Ryan’s innovation of six “canons of distributive justice” for establishing commensurability of concepts in discourse between the traditions of moral theology and economic science. This paper argues that Ryan’s distinctive experience and character allowed him to enter into conversation with a non-native tradition of enquiry to draw forth commensurate concepts that improved the coherence of his native Catholic theological understanding and afforded greater opportunities to discourse with social scientists in meaningful argument for the sake of human welfare.