Displaying: 121-140 of 234 documents

0.096 sec

121. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 3 > Issue: 2
Robert Christie Conversion Through the Liturgy
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
The liturgy is the unique intersection of the worshipping community’s spiritual and theological life. John Henry Newman’s 1830 series of liturgy sermons—most of which were not published until 1991—not only supports this description but is also particularly relevant to the Church of the twenty-first century, which struggles with the issue of the community’s liturgical participation as part of its spiritual and theological life.
122. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 3 > Issue: 2
Edward Jeremy Miller Newman on the Voice of the Laity: Lessons for Today’s Church
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
This essay, which was originally the opening presentation for the 2005 conference of the Venerable John Henry Newman Association on “Newman and the Laity” at Villanova University, discusses four areas where Newman’s ideas about the voice of the laity have lessons for American Catholic life today: his non-clericalized view of the Church, the lack of appreciation for the laity, his vision of an educated laity, and the need for consulting the laity about doctrinal matters.
123. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 3 > Issue: 2
Jane Rupert Religious Formation of the Laity at the Catholic University of Ireland
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
This article, which was originally presented at the annual conference of the Venerable John Henry Newman Association at Villanova University in July 2005, examines the “religious formation” of students at the Catholic University of Ireland as presented by Newman in his university sermons and discourses. Newman wanted the students to develop not only intellectually, but also religiously and morally. He saw tutors as critical to this process of formation.
124. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 3 > Issue: 2
Newman Bibliography
125. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 4 > Issue: 1
NINS Update
126. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 4 > Issue: 1
John T. Ford “May Newman’s Example Continue to Inspire New Generations of Students to Draw Abundantly from the Richness of the Christian Tradition in Order to Respond to the Deepest Yearnings of The Human Spirit. . . .”
127. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 4 > Issue: 1
Randall Rosenberg Newman on the Relationship between Natural and Revealed Religion: His University Sermons and the Grammar of Assent
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
This essay discusses Newman’s view of the relationship between Natural and Revealed Religion in his second University Sermon (1830) and in his Grammar of Assent (1870). To what extent did Newman’s view change during the four decades between this early Anglican sermon and his major treatment of the nature of faith as a Roman Catholic?
128. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 4 > Issue: 1
Catharine M. Ryan Eternal World Television Network: Newman at 2000
129. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 4 > Issue: 1
Michael Eades Newman’s Adaptation of Bacci’s The Life of St. Philip Neri
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
This essay explores a relatively unknown and previously unstudied Newman work, The Life of St. Philip: Arranged for the Days of the Year, that he prepared for the use of his nascent English Oratorian community.
130. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 4 > Issue: 1
Todd Ream Tales from Two Cities: The Evolving Identity of John Henry Newman’s The Idea of a University
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
This essay describes not only the evolving identity of Newman’s The Idea of a University, but also the way in which this process points to a larger tension between what Augustine referred to as the City of God and the city of this world.While no other work is perhaps more quoted than Newman’s Idea in relation to theoretical conceptions of university life, the origins of this work are often little understood. As a result, Newman’s Idea frequently goes from being a work whose identity is derived from the City of God to being a book whose identity is derived from various manifestations of the city of this world.
131. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 4 > Issue: 1
Drew Morgan John Henry Newman—Doctor of Conscience: Doctor of the Church?
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
Should Newman be designated a “Doctor of the Church”? This essay responds first by considering the history and meaning of the title “Doctor of the Church,” and then by examining the recent Norms and Criteria proposed by the Vatican Congregation for designating Doctrine of the Church
132. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 4 > Issue: 1
Marty Miller Maddox Newman: Certain Knowledge and “The Problem of the Criterion”
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
This essay examines Newman’s approach to the age-old skeptical “problem of the criterion” in his An Essay in Aid of a Grammar of Assent. By examining Newman’s accent on the illative sense as right judgment in rationation, especially in the justification of first principles of knowledge, this essay depicts Newman as offering a proceduralist approach to answering “the problem of the criterion.”
133. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 4 > Issue: 1
Daniel Callam Newman’s Sense of the Real
134. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 4 > Issue: 1
Newman Chronology
135. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 4 > Issue: 1
Newman Bibliography
136. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 4 > Issue: 2
John Wayne Love Lessons In Virtue: Nineteenth-Century Lectures And Sermons To English And American Medical Students And Physicians
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
This article surveys the themes of six nineteenth-century Christian leaders—Frederick Denison Maurice, LaRue Thompson, William Bacon Stevens, John Henry Newman, Flodoardo Howard, and Henry Parry Liddon—in their preaching to medical students and physicians. Usually delivered at the behest of the medical students and medical schools, these sermons to the medical community clearly illustrate the impact of religious thought on medical training in Western Europe and the United States, shed important light on the historical dialogue between the worlds of science and religion, and offer an eloquent apologia of why virtue and ethics are important in medicine.
137. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 4 > Issue: 2
John T. Ford John Henry Newman: The Relationship Between Theology And Science
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
This essay examines Newman’s Dublin lecture on the relationship between Theology and Science—their inevitable intersections and their circumstantial collisions. What lessons can be learned from Newman’s “view” of Theology and Science in considering the confrontations between Theology and Science in the twenty-first century?
138. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 4 > Issue: 2
T. L. Holtzen Newman’s Via Media Theology of Justification
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
This essay argues that Newman’s theology of justification is a true via media between Roman Catholicism and Protestantism because of its Trinitarian character. While conceding that Newman misunderstood Luther’s theology of justification, this essay explores Newman’s theology of justification through Christ’s divine indwelling in the Holy Spirit. The Holy Spirit is the formal cause of the soul’s justice, because through the Spirit, both Christ’s alien righteousness and an actual inherent righteousness are brought to the soul.Accordingly, justification is a Trinitarian action of “the two hands of God.”
139. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 4 > Issue: 2
Walter E. Conn Newman Versus Subjectivism: The Context Of Liberalism, Evangelicalism, And Rationalism
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
As a way of overcoming the conflict between the Apologia’s focus on Liberalism and Frank Turner’s recent insistence that the real Tractarian target was Evangelicalism, this essay proposes that Newman’s fundamental opponent was subjectivism.
140. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 4 > Issue: 2
Keith Andrew Massey Vergilian Allusions In Newman’s “Kindly Light”
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
What is the literary antecedent to Newman’s famous “Lead, Kindly Light”? This essay proposes that Newman’s phrase—“Kindly Light”— is an allusion to a specific passage of Vergil’s Aeneid. Understood in this light, Newman’s poem is a prologue to the epic journey Newman began as he returned to England to commence the Oxford Movement.