Displaying: 101-120 of 615 documents

0.07 sec

101. Bowling Green Studies in Applied Philosophy: Volume > 8
Larry May The Moral Interests of Social Groups
102. Bowling Green Studies in Applied Philosophy: Volume > 8
Jan Narveson A Contractarian Defense of the Liberal View on Abortion and of the Wrongness of Infanticide
103. Bowling Green Studies in Applied Philosophy: Volume > 8
Holmes Rolston III The Human Standing in Nature: Storied Fitness in the Moral Overseer
104. Bowling Green Studies in Applied Philosophy: Volume > 8
Gerald H. Paske The Moral Priority of (Most) Human Beings
105. Bowling Green Studies in Applied Philosophy: Volume > 8
L. W. Sumner Subjectivity and Moral Standing
106. Bowling Green Studies in Applied Philosophy: Volume > 8
Eric Katz Buffalo-Killing and the Valuation of Species
107. Bowling Green Studies in Applied Philosophy: Volume > 8
R. G. Frey Autonomy and Conceptions of the Good Life
108. Bowling Green Studies in Applied Philosophy: Volume > 8
Michael Wreen The Possibility of Potentiality
109. Bowling Green Studies in Applied Philosophy: Volume > 8
Christopher W. Morris Value Subjectivism, Individualism, and Moral Standing
110. Bowling Green Studies in Applied Philosophy: Volume > 8
Robert B. Hallborg, Jr. The Exploitation of Human Death
111. Bowling Green Studies in Applied Philosophy: Volume > 8
L. W. Sumner A Response to Morris
112. Bowling Green Studies in Applied Philosophy: Volume > 8
James Griffin How Anthropocentric is Our Notion of Rights?
113. The Ruffin Series of the Society for Business Ethics: Volume > 1
Norman E. Bowie A Kantian Theory of Capitalism
114. The Ruffin Series of the Society for Business Ethics: Volume > 1
R. Edward Freeman Poverty and the Politics of Capitalism
115. The Ruffin Series of the Society for Business Ethics: Volume > 1
Patricia H. Werhane Introduction: Ruffin Series: New Approaches to Business Ethics
116. The Ruffin Series of the Society for Business Ethics: Volume > 1
Donna J. Wood Ingroups and Outgroups: What Psychology Doesn’t Say
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
I am foregoing the discussant's critical role in favor of a short examination of how one sociologist's imagination is tantalized and irritated by some of the ideas and interconnections of Professor Messick's paper. The question is, when it comes to ingroups and outgroups, why does race matter? Why does sex or gender matter? I will briefly make four points about sociobiology, favoritism toward the ingroup, hostility toward the outgroup, and finally, the conflict theorist's favorite topic - resource allocation.
117. The Ruffin Series of the Society for Business Ethics: Volume > 1
Edwin M. Hartman Altruism, Ingroups, and Fairness: Comments on David Messick’s “Social Categories and Business Ethics”
118. The Ruffin Series of the Society for Business Ethics: Volume > 1
George G. Brenkert Marketing and the Vulnerable
119. The Ruffin Series of the Society for Business Ethics: Volume > 1
David M. Messick Social Categories and Business Ethics
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
In this article, I want to draw attention to one strand ofthe complex web of processes that are involved when people group others, including themselves, into social categories. I will focus on the tendency to treat members of one's own group more favorably than nonmembers, a tendency that has been called ingroup favoritism. The structure of the article has three parts. First I will offer anevolutionary argument as to why ingroup favoritism, or something very much like it, is required by theories of the evolution of altruism. I will then review some of the basic social psychological research findings dealing with social categorization generally, and ingroup favoritism specifically. Finally, I will examine two problems in business ethics from the point of view of ingroup favoritism to suggest ways in which social psychological principles and findings may be mobilized to help solve problems of racial or gender discrimination in business contexts.
120. The Ruffin Series of the Society for Business Ethics: Volume > 1
Patricia H. Werhane Moral Imagination and the Search for Ethical Decision-Making in Management