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101. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 19
David A. Gilbert The Novena to St. Boniface of Tarsus: A Pastoral Program for Addressing Sexual Addiction in Colonial Mexico
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During the eighteenth century a priest in Mexico City wrote a novena to the once renowned St. Boniface of Tarsus to assist Christians trapped in sexual immorality. This saint was chosen in particular because of the sinful life that preceded his spectacular repentance and martyrdom. Unfortunately, the decline in devotion to St. Boniface has been accompanied by a misinterpretation of the novena by some modern readers who see it as focused exclusively on homosexuality. While the Mexican priest took a hard line against the sexual sins of his day, his novena reflects psychological insight and pastoral sensitivity that are consistent with contemporary approaches to addiction and therefore remain quite relevant.
102. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 19
Guillermo Montes Michael J. Sandel, What Money Can’t Buy: The Moral Limits of Markets
103. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 19
James Likoudis Child Abuse, Family Rights, and the Child Protective System: A Critical Analysis from Law, Ethics, and Catholic Social Teaching, ed. Stephen M. Krason
104. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 19
Joseph F. Wysocki A Second Look at First Things: A Case for Conservative Politics; The Hadley Arkes Festschrift, ed. Francis J. Beckwith, Robert P. George, and Susan McWilliams
105. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 19
Peter Beaulieu An Institutional Case Study Reflecting Catholic Social Thought: Transport Industries
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This paper offers a concrete example how subsidiarity and solidarity can both be advanced together in political and economic strategies. The de facto case study deals with the intersection between privately owned transport industries engaged in global trade (e.g., national railroads, transoceanic shipping lines) and local, state and federal agencies attentive to the national economy and responsible for public investments and safety regulations. The model features a broad roundtable element together with other overlapping but more focused initiatives to implement identified action packages. Ten adaptable and transferable lessons are identified.
106. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 19
Gary D. Glenn Tocqueville's "Democratic Despotism" and Pope Benedict's "Dictatorship of Relativism"
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The thought of these philosophic thinkers structures this study. Both perceive an affinity between democracy and “unlimited government.” Tocqueville’s thought sometimes reflects Catholic sensibilities and themes. Benedict’s thought reflects Catholic orthodoxy. Both thinkers, separated by 170 years, emphasize respectively “despotism” and “dictatorship,” which they think democracy is open to, endangered by, and tends towards. While Tocqueville sees the danger as “democracy,” and Benedict sees it as “relativism,” they are describing the same phenomenon. “Democratic despotism” results from attenuating the “habits of restraint” undergirding democracy; and the “dictatorship” embodies the despotism in our time.
107. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 19
Stephen M. Krason Our New Albigensian Age
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This was one of SCSS president and Franciscan University of Steubenville professor Stephen M. Krason’s “Neither Left Nor Right, but Catholic” columns that appeared initially in Crisismagazine.com on September 17, 2013. It points to the curious similarities between what the adherents of the Albigensian heresy (a version of Gnosticism)—which, incidentally, helped trigger the Inquisition—believed and current cultural perspectives. The parallels between the Albigensians and the current age, especially on sexual and human life questions and male-female relations, are striking.
108. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 19
Stephen M. Krason Reclaiming America's Religious—and Christian—Culture
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This was one of SCSS president and Franciscan University of Steubenville professor Stephen M. Krason’s “Neither Left Nor Right, but Catholic” columns that appeared initially in Crisismagazine.com on February 3, 2013. It discusses the ongoing assault by secularist groups to cleanse American public life of any vestiges of religion. This radical separationism, which had its roots in the post-Civil War period and essentially was embraced by the U.S. Supreme Court in its long line of establishment clause decisions, is completely contrary to the thinking of the Founding Fathers and the predominant culture of earlier America. Krason calls for a renewed effort, at different levels, to reclaim America’s historically religious and Christian culture.
109. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 19
Bryan R. Cross Gregory R. Beabout, The Character of the Manager: From Office Executive to Wise Steward
110. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 19
Michael G. Moore In Memoriam: Brian Midgley (1927-2014)
111. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 19
Thomas E. Kelly In Memoriam: Eileen P. Kelly (1955-2013)
112. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 19
Joseph A. Varacalli The Future of the American Experiment and of the Tea Party Movement from the Perspective of Catholic Social Thought and Catholic Sociology
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This review essay provides a critique, from a Catholic social thought and Catholic sociological perspective, of two important books that offer divergent interpretations of the direction of American civilization and of the significance of the Tea Party movement/philosophy. Specifically devoted to a critique of the Tea Party movement, by Theda Skocpol and Vanessa Williamson (Oxford University Press, 2012), is written from a secular progressive sociological perspective that assumes the inevitability and desirability of an advanced welfare state. While not specifically devoted to analyzing the Tea Party movement, by Samuel Gregg (The Crossroad Publishing Company, 2013), quite consciously constructs a public philosophy articulating and defending a democratic capitalist worldview that is compatible, as a prudential application, with an authentic Catholic perspective that builds on the work of Catholic theologian Michael Novak (e.g., [Simon & Schuster, 1982] and [Harper & Row, 1984]). Vis-à-vis the Skocpol and Williamson volume, the Gregg volume is more sympathetic to the Tea Party movement, especially with its non-libertarian component. Other volumes are mentioned and incorporated in the review essay insofar as they deal with various cognitive and normative analyses of the present general direction of American civilization and of the Tea Party alternative.
113. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 19
Jeremy Skrzypek Alexander R. Pruss, One Body: An Essay in Christian Sexual Ethics
114. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 19
Anne Hendershott Mary Eberstadt, How the West Really Lost God
115. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 2
Dominic A. Aquila Editor's Message
116. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 2
Kenneth L. Grasso Introduction
117. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 2
Gerard V. Bradley The Pluralist Game: Francis Canavan on Law, Public Morality, and Pluralism in Contemporary America
118. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 2
Robert R. Hunt Are There Two or One?: Francis Canavan on the Nature of Liberalism
119. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 2
Robert F. Cuervo Francis Canavan and the Recovery of Edmund Burke
120. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 2
William R. Luckey Purpose as Limit: Francis Canavan and the Political Theory of Speech and Press