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101. Chiasmi International: Volume > 20
Maurice Merleau-Ponty Éloge de la philosophie
102. Chiasmi International: Volume > 20
Maurice Merleau-Ponty Kurt Goldstein, La structure de l’organisme
103. Chiasmi International: Volume > 20
Maurice Merleau-Ponty Les aventures de la dialectique
104. Chiasmi International: Volume > 20
Maurice Merleau-Ponty Signes
105. Chiasmi International: Volume > 20
Maurice Merleau-Ponty Intervention à propos de « Commentaire sur l’idée de la phénoménologie » de A. De Waelhens
106. Chiasmi International: Volume > 20
Maurice Merleau-Ponty Intervention à propos de « La phénoménologie contre The Concept of Mind » de G. Ryle
107. Chiasmi International: Volume > 20
Maurice Merleau-Ponty Une lettre de Maurice Merleau-Ponty à Éric Weil
108. Chiasmi International: Volume > 20
Maurice Merleau-Ponty Une lettre de Maurice Merleau-Ponty à Jacques Garelli
109. Chiasmi International: Volume > 20
Maurice Merleau-Ponty Une lettre de Maurice Merleau-Ponty à Simone De Beauvoir
110. Chiasmi International: Volume > 20
Maurice Merleau-Ponty Lettres de Maurice Merleau-Ponty à Alphonse De Waelhens, 1946-1961
111. Chiasmi International: Volume > 21
Galen A. Johnson Présentation
112. Chiasmi International: Volume > 21
Lovisa Andén, Franck Robert Introduction: Le problème de la parole, extrait de la leçon du 25 février 1954. Proust et la littérature
113. Chiasmi International: Volume > 21
Maurice Merleau-Ponty Extrait. Proust. Une théorie, – et une pratique concordante, – du langage
114. Chiasmi International: Volume > 21
Galen A. Johnson Introduction: Sur la littérature et le vrai
115. Chiasmi International: Volume > 21
Mauro Carbone Orcid-ID La surface obscure: La littérature et la philosophie en tant que dispositifs de vision selon Merleau-Ponty
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The whole path of Merleau-Ponty’s thought is crossed – some times more evidently than others – by what I propose to qualify as the idea of literature and philosophy as visual apparatuses (dispositifs), to use an expression that was born – and not by chance – in the field of Film Studies. More precisely, I aim at asserting that Merleau-Ponty sees literature and philosophy working in his epoch as convergent apparatuses of vision, in turn understood as a bodily and not merely ocular practice. Immediately after that, I should specify that such convergent visual apparatuses peculiarly function by words, and that Merleau-Ponty stresses their different efficiency in expressing his epoch. Moreover, I think that the implicit idea of philosophy as a visual apparatus working by words “like all literature” has a particularly relevant but so far not consequently developed place in in the last period of Merleau-Ponty’s thought. Also, I would like to stress that such a perspective is crucial in our own time too, even though I consider it to be different from Merleau-Ponty’s. Indeed, I think that both our time and Merleau-Ponty’s are characterized by a tension between the increasing importance of images and the traditional centrality of the concept in our culture.
116. Chiasmi International: Volume > 21
Franck Robert Merleau-Ponty, L’origine de la géométrie et la littérature
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The commentary Merleau-Ponty offers in 1960 on Husserl’s The Origin of Geometry gives a privileged place to language, to writing: it is perhaps a great astonishment to see Merleau-Ponty, in continuity with Husserl, thinking about the genesis of geometrical ideality beginning from a meditation on literature. Merleau-Ponty’s reflection on literature took a decisive ontological turn at the beginning of the 1950s, notably in the long commentary on Proust in 1953-1954. It is in this spirit that the course of 1960 grants to literature an ontological sense: the ideality of geometry can occur as ideality by the passage to speech and to writing, but the meaning of even scientific ideality can be understood only if one places it on the basis of more fundamental idealities that literature precisely reveals, idealities that are linked across time, in the connection between past and present, self and other. Literature clarifies the history of geometry in yet another manner: it brings to light the intertwining of human-language-world, condition of the emergence of a true sense, which occurs in the history of geometry, and which literature, assuming our being in speech bears more fundamentally still.
117. Chiasmi International: Volume > 21
Emmanuel Alloa Orcid-ID Le premier livre de Merleau-Ponty, un roman
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In his late writings, Merleau-Ponty stressed the convergences between philosophy and literature, highlighting their “common task” of describing the world. His early philosophical texts though – both Simone de Beauvoir and Jean-Paul Sartre pointed this out – insist on demarcating themselves from literature. However, well before publishing his first monographs (The Structure of Behaviour in 1942 and Phenomenology of Perception in 1945), Merleau-Ponty had already written a book on someone else’s behalf: Nord. Récit de l’arctique, published in 1928 by French publisher Grasset. The novel, which deals with the life of an explorer in Canada’s far north, between fur trade and encounters with the Inuit, is the result of ghostwriting, carried out for a friend (Jacques Heller). Merleau-Ponty later never stood to that book. There are nonetheless some interesting motifs in this early piece of writing that prefigure his future thinking.
118. Chiasmi International: Volume > 21
Ann V. Murphy Introduction: Le sens du lieu
119. Chiasmi International: Volume > 21
Charles Bobant Merleau-Ponty et l’art: un itinéraire philosophique
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In this work, we undertake to demonstrate that the merleau-pontian inquiry into art orders itself according to three distinct and successive speculative movements. In the 1940s, the elaboration of a phenomenology of perception led Merleau-Ponty to approach art starting from the work of art and the perceiving subject who receives it, the spectator. From the beginning of the 1950s, this phenomenology of the work of art and aesthetic perception gave way to a philosophy of expression. The point of departure for artistic questioning changes: it is no longer the meaning expressed, but the expressive or creative act. The signification of the work of art sees itself from this moment understood starting from the meaning of being for the artist: the work is a response to perceptive omissions (manques perceptifs) of the artist. At the end of the 1950s, the merleau-pontian progress of thought experiences an ontological turning. Merleau-Ponty wants to regress below the artist, toward Being itself, which imposes itself finally as the true creator. The last merleau-pontian philosophy of art takes from this moment the aspects of a traditional philosophy of inspiration.
120. Chiasmi International: Volume > 22
Federico Leoni Orcid-ID Présentation