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101. Spiritual Goods: Faith Traditions and the Practice of Business: Spiritual Goods: Faith Traditions and the Practice of Business
Eastern Orthodoxy
102. Spiritual Goods: Faith Traditions and the Practice of Business: Spiritual Goods: Faith Traditions and the Practice of Business
Bodhipaksa Reinventing the Wheel: A Buddhist Approach to Ethical Work
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The key to Buddhist business practice is "Right Livelihood," or work that is founded on Buddhist ethical values and that contributes to spiritual development. This essay focuses on Windhorse Trading, a company based in the United Kingdom that was consciously established as a Right Livelihood business within the Friends of the Western Buddhist Order. The essay explores how the company dealt with a conflict that arose when a period of rapid expansion began to undermine the effectiveness of the workplace as a context for spiritual practice. I ask whether a business founded on Buddhist principles can be financially viable in the modern marketplace, and conclude that Windhorse's crisis resulted from a failure to adapt to rapid growth, rather than from an inherent flaw in the conception of a financially and spiritually successful business.
103. Spiritual Goods: Faith Traditions and the Practice of Business: Spiritual Goods: Faith Traditions and the Practice of Business
Acknowledgments
104. Spiritual Goods: Faith Traditions and the Practice of Business: Spiritual Goods: Faith Traditions and the Practice of Business
Barbara Hilkert Andolsen Roman Catholic Tradition and Ritual and Business Ethics: A Feminist Perspective
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Clerical workers are an important segment of the work force. Catholic social teachings and eucharistic practice shed useful moral light on the increase in contingent work arrangements among clerical workers. The venerable concept of "the universal destination of the goods of creation" and a newer understanding of technology as "a shared workbench" illuminate the importance of good jobs for clerical workers. However, in order to apply Catholic social teachings to issues concerning clerical work as women's work, sexist elements in traditional Catholic social teachings must be critically assessed. Participation in the Eucharist helps shape a moral stance of inclusivity and sensitivity to forms of social marginalization. While actual practice fails fully to embody gender or racial inclusivity, participation in the inclusive table fellowship of the Eucharist should make business leaders question treating contingent workers as a peripheral work force.
105. Spiritual Goods: Faith Traditions and the Practice of Business: Spiritual Goods: Faith Traditions and the Practice of Business
James Halteman A Mennonite Approach to Business Ethics
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Mennonites in the U.S. trace their roots back to the early sixteenth century Anabaptist reformers in Europe. Believing that the church is to give a foretaste of the coming kingdom of God, Mennonites emphasize discipleship, community, and the conviction that God works in the world through two distinct kingdoms. In the early days of persecution, the divide between the two kingdoms was clear, but, as Mennonites became mainstreamed in a tolerant society, the divide between secular and sacred became ambiguous. Mennonites believe that faith calls them to a higher ethical standard in business than they can expect of society at large: to be in the business world but not of it. Discipleship means witnessing to the non-Christian world. Consequently, Mennonite businesspersons seek to be servant-managers and servant-owners.
106. Spiritual Goods: Faith Traditions and the Practice of Business: Spiritual Goods: Faith Traditions and the Practice of Business
Jamal A. Badawi Islamic Business Ethics
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This essay focuses on the normative teachings of Islam. Justice, honesty, and public welfare are the pillars of Islamic business ethics. These values have two major roots: (1) belief in and devotion to Allah (God), and (2) the earthly trusteeship that grounds moral accountability. The business values of productivity, hard work, and excellence are encouraged. However, at the heart of various injunctions relating to business transactions are the imperatives of lawfulness, honesty, and fair play. Products or services must be lawful, and produced in lawful ways causing no undue harm to others or to the environment. Competition, distribution, and consumption must be lawful as well. Lawful behavior is enforced by consciousness of Allah, supportive social norms, and government control. Islamic norms may not be uniformly or strictly followed, yet they provide a helpful background to practitioners andresearchers.
107. Spiritual Goods: Faith Traditions and the Practice of Business: Spiritual Goods: Faith Traditions and the Practice of Business
James M. Childs, Jr. Lutheran Perspectives on Ethical Business in an Age of Downsizing
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Fundamental theological and ethical themes of Luther's thought and tradition provide a basis for appreciating both the role of business in God's providential design and the importance of occupation for living out one's Christian vocation. These same insights establish the ethical basis for a critical appraisal of the current practice of downsizing and its negative impact on the quality of individual lives and whole communities. While Lutheran ethics is realistic about the ambiguities of life, it is also an ethic of compassionate love seeking justice in the world of business as in all of life.
108. Spiritual Goods: Faith Traditions and the Practice of Business: Spiritual Goods: Faith Traditions and the Practice of Business
Protestantism: The African American Church
109. Spiritual Goods: Faith Traditions and the Practice of Business: Spiritual Goods: Faith Traditions and the Practice of Business
Daniel B. McGee Business Ethics Among Baptists: A Story of Competing Visions
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This study focuses upon two competing visions of wealth and work among Baptists in America and how these different visions have shaped Baptist business ethics. Russell H. Conwell reflected the Reformed tradition's inclination toward what came to be called the Protestant work ethic and its defense of capitalism. He contended that American capitalism presented an open door for any diligent worker to achieve deserved riches. Walter Rauschenbusch reflected the Anabaptist heritage in the stream of Baptist history. He challenged the dominant ethos of the industrial revolution in America and its preference for the interests of management; he called instead for the protection of the worker from the monopolistic power of the capitalists. These two contrasting postures influenced the response of Baptists to the labor-management struggle.
110. Spiritual Goods: Faith Traditions and the Practice of Business: Spiritual Goods: Faith Traditions and the Practice of Business
Judaism