Narrow search


By category:

By publication type:

By language:

By journals:

By document type:


Displaying: 101-120 of 759 documents

0.074 sec

101. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 19 > Issue: 1
Gerald Holton Michael Polanyi and the History of Science
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
This essay is a study of Polanyi’s career as scientist and philosopher from the point of view of the history of science, starting with the first step in his academic career helped by an intervention of Albert Einstein. Polanyi’s ideas are better understood if placed against the background of then-fashionable philosophical movements, including logical positivism, and his disagreement with Bukharin in 1935. The essay studies the sources and ambitions of Polanyi’s notion of the tacit dimension, his attitude to evolution and “emergence,” and his contribution to the search for the origins of Einstein’s Relativity Theory. His success in the last of these is shown to be an exemplar of Polanyi’s own philosophy.
102. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 19 > Issue: 1
Allen R. Dyer Polanyi and Post-modernism
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
Post-modernism is receiving much attention, but it is often seen as merely an extrapolation of modernism. Michael Polanyi’s post-critical epistemology offers a useful way of understanding post-modernism. The modern objectivism of critical thought leads to a dead-end dehumanization. Polanyi offers a recovery of the human dimension by demonstrating the ways in which all knowing, especially scientific discovery, requires human participation. An analogy is drawn with post-modern art and architecture, which similarly attempt to recover the human form and traditional or classical ornamentation in a way which goes beyond the sterile abstractness of modernism.
103. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 19 > Issue: 1
Dale Cannon Toward the Recovery of Common Sense in a Post-critical Intellectual Ethos
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
The modern critical tradition’s strategy for defeating the demon of self doubt and securing certainty, as Hannah Arendt has written, restricts serious candidates for belief to those whose conditions of truth can be rendered wholly immanent to focal consciousness within a point of view that is simply taken for granted. Thereby it forecloses the possibility of recognizing the partiality of its own perspective vis-a-vis that of others, taking into account the relevant perspectives of other persons, and reaching any kind of sense in common between perspectives. The institutionalization of this strategy in 20th century academic life is amply and insightfully documented in Bruce Wilshire’s Moral Collapse of the University. Michael Polanyi, in his writings, adumbrates a post-critical intellectual ethos in whichthe making of sense in common between persons of differing perspective is central to the enterprise of teaching, learning, and research. Key elements of such an intellectual ethos are articulated and explored.
104. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 19 > Issue: 2
Preface
105. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 19 > Issue: 2
Spenser A. McWilliams Indeterminacy and the Construction of Personal Knowledge
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
Polanyi’s post-critical philosophy contains a tension between the personal commitment of the knower to the apprehension of knowledge and the understanding of the incomplete, or potentially mistaken, nature of current understanding. This essay addresses this tension, both theoretically and practically, by drawing parallels between Polanyi’s theory and George Kelly’s Personal Construct Psychology. The two approaches share many similar assumptions about the development of knowledge. Application of Kelly’s perspective may assist us in developing direct awareness of our active participation in creating knowledge, and helping us to articulate some of our underlying assumptions. Such activities facilitate movement toward more comprehensive understanding.
106. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 19 > Issue: 2
Phil Rolnick Polanyi's Progress: Transcendence, Universality and Teleology
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
Michael Polanyi’s work supports the idea of progress by linking progress to the transcendent, the universal, and the teleological. Polanyi’s epistemology is developed in tandem with an implied metaphysics, one which incorporates a tripartite dialectic among the community, the individual, and the transcendent,universal reality which both community and individual progressively seek. Traditions, whether scientific or religious, may rightfully claim a penultimate authority. However, in science just as in religion, only the living God can possess ultimate authority. Hence, traditions may undergo progressive development by breaking out of their current understandings en route to greater understandings. In order to do so, the tradition must continually submit itself to the reality which it seeks to mediate to its members.
107. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 2 > Issue: 1
Discussion with Prosch at AAR
108. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 2 > Issue: 2
Doug Adams II. "Implications of Polanyi's Thought Within the Arts" A Bibliographic Essay" by Doug Adams.
109. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 20 > Issue: 1
John V. Apczynski Polanyi's Au gustinianism: A Mark of the Future?
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
The aim of this essay is to display a congruence between several important features of Augustine’s theory of knowledge, including our knowledge of the world (sapientia) and our knowledge of the standards guiding our thought (sapientia), and Michael Polanyi’s theory of personal knowledge. Its purpose is to commendan interpretation of Polanyi’s thought which situates his major insights within an Augustinian intellectual tradition and which thereby offers fruitful possibilities for theological reflection, particularly on the reality of God.
110. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 20 > Issue: 1
Phil Mullins Preface
111. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 20 > Issue: 1
Elizabeth Newman An Alternative Form of Theological Knowing
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
This essay seeks to incorporate Polanyi’s post-critical conception of knowing more fully into theology by emphasizing that all knowing is a personal activity rooted in a particular place. While deconstruction describes itself as post-critical, its assumption that all knowledge is a social “construct’ and/or an instrument of social coercion fails to account for the involvement of the person in all acts of knowing.
112. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 20 > Issue: 1
R. Taylor Scott William H. Poteat: A Laudatio
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
William H. Poteat’s thought, while indebted to Michael Polanyi, originates in Poteat’s own project of remembering all articulate significances to their pre-articulate grounding in the mindbody. He invented the term mindbody both to overstep the traditional distinction between mind and body and to name the living arche of all meaning and meaning-discernment. In focusing on the recovery of the mindbody as the bedrock ontological matrix for the aquisition of speech, the act of explicit reference par excellence, Poteat radicalizes and advances Polanyi’s efforts to reclaim the tacit roots of all explicit knowledge.
113. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 20 > Issue: 2
Walter B. Gulick Polanyi Studies In Hungary
114. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 20 > Issue: 2
Phil Mullins Preface
115. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 20 > Issue: 2
Robert P. Doede Of Mind and Meaning
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
This paper examine’s Jerry Fodor’s attempt to naturalize the human mind by encompassing it within a new mechanistic ontology. It then explores Polanyi’s view of mind’s embodiment and meaning’s emergence in an effort to uncover some fundamental incoherencies in Fodor’s naturalization project.
116. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 20 > Issue: 2
Terence Kennedy C.SS.R. Epistemology and the Human Sciences: Michael Polanyi’s Contribution to the Reshaping of Moral Theology.
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
This article shows how there is a great kinship between Polanyi's thought and that of Bernard Haring, "the father of modern moral theology" in the Roman Catholic Church. Haring advocated an ethics of personal responsibility that calls for an epistemology such as Polanyi developed for history and social sciences in The Study of Man.
117. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 20 > Issue: 2
Gabriella Ujlaki Materials from Polanyiana
118. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 20 > Issue: 2
Jerry H. Gill Learning to Learn: Educating with/for the Mind-Body
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
This essay focuses on the applicaation of the notions of tacit knowing and embodied interaction to the college classroom. Topics ranging from classroom arrangement and discussion techniques, through curriculum and textbook choices, to attitudes and values are address.
119. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 20 > Issue: 3
John C. Puddefoot Resonance Realism
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
Our culture and tradition, including our theories and our language, act as subsidiaries by which we attune to resonances between outselves as convivial beings and the world. These resonances afford us our senses of reality and illustrate the impossibility of a correspondence theory of truth. We select between theories and versions by learning to sense the deeper and deeper resonances which they evoke in our communal selves.
120. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 20 > Issue: 3
Phil Mullins Preface