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Displaying: 101-120 of 251 documents

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101. New Vico Studies: Volume > 20
William Roger Schultz Bloom’s Theory of Poetry: The Anxiety of Vico’s Influence
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Vico’s theory of poetic origins greatly influenced Harold Bloom’s theory of poetry, called “the anxiety of influence.” Neither simple acceptance nor rejection, the complex influence is explained at main stages of Bloom’s career. In Bloom’s early writings, Vico’s ideas are virtually ignored. Starting with The Anxiety of Influence, Vico’s influence is acknowledged to be strong but it is repressed; Vico’s ideas are mentioned in only a few brief passages and usually presented through those of other thinkers, or are interpreted to be the same. In subsequent works, Bloom does discuss Vico’s ideas more. Finally, in Bloom’s Western Canon, Vico’s importance seems to be the greatest, since all the literature is categorized according to Vico’s idea of a cycle of three ages, although, once again, his ideas are not analyzed.
102. New Vico Studies: Volume > 20
Mari Lee Mifsud The Figure of Homer in the Rhetorical Structure of Vico’s Pedagogy
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The rhetorical structure of Vico’s pedagogy is shaped predominantly by the ars topica. While most would associate the ars topica with the classical Greek and Roman cultures, where theories of topoi predominate rhetorical theory and pedagogy, this essay shows that the ars topica in the rhetorical structure of Vico’s pedagogy must be heroic in nature, rather than classical. Embodied in the figure of Homer, the ars topica in Vico’s pedagogy stands beyond the technical consciousness of the classical world. The figure of Homer stands for the imaginative poetic capacity to make figural connections and to escape the reduction of meaning to technical formulae. Such escape, for Vico, ensures the life and liberty of not only the individual mind but the civic realm.
103. New Vico Studies: Volume > 20
Donald Phillip Verene Vico’s Method of Studies in Our Time
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Vico’s De nostri temporis studiorum ratione (1709) draws a distinction between two types of pedagogy, based on the difference between ars topica and ars critica, which is crucial to our present-day conception of human education. Ars critica is the source of the contemporary understanding of education. When Descartes put aside rhetoric, poetic, and history as having nothing to do with the conduct of right reasoning in the sciences, he established criticism as the ideal of education. On the Cartesian view no education is offered in the art of topics, which Vico understands as “the art of finding the middle term” that is necessary to the making of arguments.In Vico’s view, children are to be trained in memory, metaphor, and narration—or when they are adults they will be unable to find the starting points of thought. The Cartesian child will become a hollow-minded adult, expert in the use of methods, organizing materials, and calling up information but unable to make original judgments without ingenuity (ingenium)—the power to see the similar in dissimilars. On Vico’s view ars critica and all it implies is to be introduced only when the mind has been formed in its original powers of imagination.
104. New Vico Studies: Volume > 20
Molly Black Verene Vico in English Bibliography 1994-2002
105. New Vico Studies: Volume > 20
Index
106. New Vico Studies: Volume > 20
Vico and Civil Society: Four Essays
107. New Vico Studies: Volume > 21
Contents: On the One Principle and One End of Universal Law
108. New Vico Studies: Volume > 21
Giambattista Vico Synopsis of Universal Law
109. New Vico Studies: Volume > 21
Giambattista Vico Prologue to On the One Principle and One End of Universal Law
110. New Vico Studies: Volume > 21
Giambattista Vico On the One Principle and One End of Universal Law
111. New Vico Studies: Volume > 21
John D. Schaeffer Translator’s Preface to Giambattista Vico’s On the One Principle and One End of Universal Law
112. New Vico Studies: Volume > 21
Title Page: On the One Principle and One End of Universal Law
113. New Vico Studies: Volume > 21
Donald Phillip Verene Translator’s Preface to Giambattista Vico’s Synopsis of Universal Law
114. New Vico Studies: Volume > 22
Andrea Battistini Vico Alpha and Omega
115. New Vico Studies: Volume > 22
Giambattista Vico, Donald Phillip Verene “How All the Other Sciences Must Take Their Principles from This [Science of Divination]”
116. New Vico Studies: Volume > 22
Fabrizio Lomonaco The “Second New Science” (1730) from an Annotated Neapolitan Copy
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The Pietro Piovani Foundation for Vico Studies has launched a new series of the Collectio Viciana “Texts” with the anastatic reprint of the 1730 New Science. A discussion of the Foundation’s choice to reproduce the work and of many features of the text of the Second New Science is offered to accompany the publication of the text.
117. New Vico Studies: Volume > 22
Alexander U. Bertland Vico’s Reasoning Concerning the Origin of Number
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This discussion is an analysis of Vico’s account of the imaginative universals in the 1744 edition of the New Science in regard to the origin of number. The origin of number is a difficult problem for Vico because numbers are discursive concepts, yet Vico wants to fi nd their origin in mythical thought. Vico finds the origin of numbers in the power struggle between the heroes and the plebeians. The imaginative universal Mercury is the heroic act of granting bonitary ownership to the plebeians. However, Mercury is also the imaginative universal of marking heroic ownership. Number originates from the heroes emphasizing ownership by marking territory more than once. This explains several peculiar passages in the New Science, including Vico’s claims about the three frogs of France (NS par. 535).
118. New Vico Studies: Volume > 22
Giambattista Vico, Paul J. Archambault “On the Heroic Mind”
119. New Vico Studies: Volume > 22
Donald Phillip Verene Vico’s History
120. New Vico Studies: Volume > 22
An Assessment of Vico and Renaissance Studies