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101. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 6
John Cleary Poetry and Access to Knowledge (I)
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Cleary experiments with a “community of inquiry” to his high school Intro-level Philosophy course to express an alternative method for ethics through various poems and writing exercises such as “War and a Soldier” by Edgar Jablons, “Murder” by Paul Silverman, and “The Beaten Path” by Sylvia Schneider.
102. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 6
Tommy Miller Monkeys Need Time: A Dialogue (I)
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Miller finds a seven-year-old's perspective on the definition of time.
103. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 6
John Cleary Poetry and Access to Knowledge (II)
104. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 6
Graham Godwyn Plato’s Republic
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High School student Godwyn argues the certainty and significance behind the utopian society, that is, Plato’s Republic. He emphasizes the politically incorrect standards of the Republic to the modern era, while examining the vision of what Plato intended.
105. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 6
Announcement: Kids Philosophy Slam Competition
106. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 6
Obituary for Ken Knisely
107. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 6
Nathan Brubaker Wouldn’t All of Us Be Dimwitted if We Didn’t Go to Class?
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A discussion conducted by Brubacher to see the fifth grade perspective on lacking accountability in an educational setting, along with a common link to philosophical grounds.
108. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 6
Tommy Miller Monkeys Need Time: A Dialogue (II)
109. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 7
Announcement: Kids Philosophy Slam Competition
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Drawings, essays, and poems by children grades kindergarten through seven on the question: “Compassion or Violence: Which has a greater impact on society?”
110. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 7
Steve Wood The High School Philosophy Seminar and Philosophical Positivism (I)
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Description of the High School Philosophy Seminar, a philosophy outreach program run by undergraduate philosophy students at The George Washington University.
111. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 7
Cho-Kiu Lam Philosophy Files
112. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 7
Elizabeth Mauritz Humphrey Books
113. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 7
Call for Submissions
114. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 7
About the Contributors
115. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 7
Steve Wood The High School Philosophy Seminar (II)
116. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 7
John Zillmer Acting Out: Dramatizing ‘Jim and the Indians’
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Zillmer shows the benefits of having children act out situations as a way of sparking discussions with 7th and 8th graders in a philosophy class. He writes about an example from his class called "Jim and the Indians."
117. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 7
Rory E. Kraft, Jr. Does Virtue Require an Audience?: Recasting Plato’s “Ring of Gyges” for Different Ages
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The classic examples and stories that we use for college students can be used as the basis for classroom discussions at pre-college students' levels. This means occasionally simplifying a story, but with only slight effort the same sorts of questions can be used across all ages to get at the same underlying concerns.
118. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 7
Ben Thompson Coping Without Free Will: An Examination into the Effects on a Belief System of the Rejection of Free Will
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Argues that acceptance of one’s place in the natural world involves an acceptance of free will. Free will is also necessary for the continuation of a social society in that we need to accept the doctrine in order to administer justice.
119. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 7
Kids Philosopy Slam
120. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 7
Elizabeth Gyori Philosophy as a Threat to Government
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Examination of the subversive nature of philosophy as its students challenge the authority and practices of government agencies and organizations. Draws a series of connections between philosophically oriented protesters and questioners of authority ranging from Socrates to 2004 protesters at the U.S. Republican party’s presidential convention in 2004.