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Displaying: 101-120 of 1480 documents

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101. Environment, Space, Place: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
Katrina Simon Re-casting the Past: Re-instating Once Broken and Tuneless Bells and the Recalling of Past Urban Landscapes
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Th is paper explores the perception of urban landscapes through sound, using two case studies of cities where bells played a significant role in the city, where a particular dramatic event silenced these bells, and where the act of remaking broken or tuneless bells re-creates an engagement with the lived places of the past. At Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris, newly cast bells recreate the melodious peal last heard before the French Revolution, and ChristChurch Cathedral in Christchurch, New Zealand, bells damaged by destructive earthquakes of 2011 will eventually ring out their familiar tones in an urban landscape that is physically almost unrecognisable. Both case studies demonstrate the ways that the inadvertent and the deliberate transformation of soundscapes continually interactswith ideas of place and meaning within the constantly changing city.
102. Environment, Space, Place: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
Matthew G. McKay Reflecting on Access to Common Property Coastal Resources via a Case Study along Connecticut’s Shoreline
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Public access to the commons is often restricted, thus leading to implicit regulations (in addition to explicit barriers that exclude who can and who cannot utilize the commons). This is relevant toward spatial systems, as an important geographical issue is access to various sites over space (Heatwole and West 1980), and this paper presents varying degrees of accessibility in different places (i.e., municipal and state jurisdictions in the United States, with a particular emphasis on Connecticut’s coastline). There is a dialectic struggle to enhance access to the commons as a fundamental right of the public, with the need to balance tourism and recreational uses of coastal resources with conservation and preservation eff orts. This paper will aid policy makers and those concerned with beach access in Connecticut (and beyond) better understand the nature and complexity of how citizens and officials within coastal municipalities have come to perceive, in a collective sense, their beaches/ municipal parks as common property resources to be utilized for recreational purposes while balancing environmental conservation efforts simultaneously. Various legal frameworks, as well as federal and state efforts in coastal zones in key states (including Connecticut), in addition to historically recent court cases in Connecticut resulting in legal enhancements toward increasing public access to nonresidents of specific municipalities, have shaped who can and who cannot access the commons.
103. Environment, Space, Place: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
Natasha Lushetich Private Reconstructions of Past Collective Experiences: Technologies of Remembering-Forgetting
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This article queries the notion of performance as a sustained act of commemoration, and, thus, implicitly, atonement and forgetting. Laying aside potentialconsiderations of guilt and/or victimisation inherent in the spatio-temporal superimposition of a World War II modality of existence on an affluent, and, by comparison, peaceful part of the world, my investigation focuses on three mutually related areas of performance: the body’s hidden somaticity, the co-becoming of the self and time; and walking as a mnemonic mechanism. Aided by the Japanese philosophers’ Shigenori Nagatomo’s concept of the hidden body and Kitaro Nishida’s theorisation of the relationship between the temporalised and the atemporal, the actual and the virtual, the spatial and the non-spatial as the continuity of discontinuity, I argue against the idea of performance as a cumulative, sedimentary and implicitly restorative poiesispraxis. Instead, I seek to articulate the ways in which the actional, interoceptive and psychogeographic schemes generated by eating and walking intertwine to create complex patterns of individual-collectiveremembering-forgetting.
104. Environment, Space, Place: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
Chuck Ward A Philosophy of Walking. By Frédéric Gros. Translated by John Howe
105. Environment, Space, Place: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
John Kaiser Ortiz Unruly Spaces: Lost Spaces, Secret Cities, and Other Inscrutable Geographies. By Alastair Bonnett
106. Environment, Space, Place: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
Leah S. Glaser Rethinking Rural: Global Community and Economic Development in the Small Town West. By Don E. Albrecht
107. Environment, Space, Place: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Karl Benediktsson, Edda R.H. Waage Taskscapes at Sea: Trawler Fishing and the Experience of Fluid Nature
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Recent interest by scholars in the ocean and its complex geographies has not been directed much towards the everyday life of those on board fishing vessels and how they sense the nature around them. A large trawler for oceanic fishing is a highly efficient industrial production machine, carrying an array of equipment that mediates the connection between crew and nature. This article presents results from an experimental research project, where one of the authors joined a fishing trip on an Icelandic factory trawler. The resulting rich set of ethnographic material reveals much about the particularities of being at sea. It is argued that the ship can be understood as a series of distinct taskscapes, each of which affords certain relations between human and non-human nature.
108. Environment, Space, Place: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
M Jackson Representing Glaciers in Icelandic Art: A Spatial Shift
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Glaciers in Iceland are disappearing, and this article investigates how such glacier change might be transmitted into Icelandic culture, specifically, in art oriented around Icelandic glaciers. Utilizing cultural climatology as an approach, this article analyzes changes in spatial properties of glaciers as represented in older and newer artworks. Three central spatial characteristics of glaciers emerge and provide insights into how glacier loss can be represented and understood: 1) the compression of traditional distance; 2) the use of multiple perspectives; and 3) the structural representation of the glacier body. Analysis suggests a re-positioning of glaciers in the cultural imaginary and the fluctuating nature of how individuals and societies understand themselves and their place within the glaciated landscapes.
109. Environment, Space, Place: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
C. Patrick Heidkamp On Nordic Place-making: Introduction to the Themed Issue on Nordic Environments, Nordic Places, Nordic Spaces
110. Environment, Space, Place: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Alex Zukas Dreamland
111. Environment, Space, Place: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Troy R.E. Paddock Northscapes: History, Technology, and the Making of Northern Environments
112. Environment, Space, Place: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Jordan P. Howell, Todd Sundberg Towards an Affective Geopolitics: Soft Power and the Danish Notion of “Hygge”
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Affective geographies examine the emotional dimensions of space and spatial relationships; (critical) geopolitics seeks to understand the role of space and geography in international relations. In this paper, we consider a hybridization of these concepts in the context of the Nordic countries, and in particular Denmark. Nordic countries have shifted attention to the wielding of “soft power” as a tool in seeking to achieve international relations and economic goals. We argue that in the case of Denmark, these soft power tools bear an interesting affective dimension through an emphasis on “hygge,” or, “coziness.” Through media analysis, we illuminate the components of soft power in the Danish case and highlight the role of affect as a key element of these soft power tools.
113. Environment, Space, Place: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Jennifer Grace Smith, Catherine Patricia Chambers Where Are All The Fish?: Local Fish Networks in the Westfjords of Iceland
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We used a paper-based survey to explore dynamics of Local Food Networks (LFNs) for fish in the Icelandic Westfjords. Preference for local fish remains high, and fish consumption is largely embedded within a gift network, rather than typical commercial channels off ering costly, frozen, and non-local products. Individuals lacking personal connections to the fishing industry obtain fish from these commercial networks. LFNs for fish in rural Icelandic communities are therefore expressions of power dimensions that are symptomatic of the larger inequalities built into the fisheries management system, designed for globalized food networks. The disconnect between large-scale production mechanisms and local consumption patterns highlights the lack of responsiveness of the fishing industry to local Icelandic consumers and demonstrates the impacts national political structures can have on LFNs.
114. Environment, Space, Place: Volume > 8 > Issue: 1
Victor Counted Making Sense of Place Attachment: Towards a Holistic Understanding of People-Place Relationships and Experiences
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The article is an attempt to make sense of the different interdisciplinary perspectives associated with people’s attachment to places with a view to construct a holistic template for understanding people-place relationships and experiences. The author took note of the theoretical contributions of Jorgensen & Stedman (2001), Scannell & Gifford (2010), and Seamon (2012, 2014) to construct an integrative framework for understanding emotional links to places and people’s perception and experience of places. This was done with the intention of illuminating the meaning of place and the different “places” people get attached to. The paper concludes by incorporating different place frameworks with the intention of establishing a holistic model for understanding the various attributes and perceptions of people-place relationships and experiences.
115. Environment, Space, Place: Volume > 8 > Issue: 1
Winnie L. M. Yee Fashion, Affect, and Poetry in a Global City
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Everyday life is a central theme of Hong Kong poetry. Many Hong Kong poets use the quotidian as a starting point for the exploration of history and alternative imaginings. This mundane focus, unlike the colonial dreamscape of Hong Kong as an economic miracle, allows writers to reflect upon Hong Kong as a post-colonial and global space. The Hong Kong writer Natalia Chan examines the complex nature of everyday life within the space of the global and post-colonial city. Chan’s poems deal with the essence of everydayness and use commodities to conjure up the vivacity of the urbanscape of Hong Kong. Unlike the political and economic discourse that is usually used to define Hong Kong, Chan’s work portrays Hong Kong as a city that offers the possibility of daily re-creation against the background of history. In this article, we will examine Chan’s use of the circulation of commodities in the global world and explore the way fashion becomes a point where high and popular culture, private and public domains, and local and global interests clash, negotiate, and fertilize each other. Chan’s works do not conform to the economic and prosperity discourse that has repressed Hong Kong; rather, she guides her readers to re-experience the everydayness of routines, to celebrate alternate ways of understanding the urbanscape, and to open themselves to the potentialities of art and the everyday.
116. Environment, Space, Place: Volume > 8 > Issue: 1
Jeffrey B. Webb Watershed Redesign in the Upper Wabash River Drainage Area, 1870-1970
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The Huntington, Salamonie, and Mississinewa reservoirs in northern Indiana control seasonal flooding in the Upper Wabash River drainage area. They appeared in the 1960s after a long period of study and planning in response to large-scale flooding in central and southern Indiana in the first half of the twentieth century. Their construction disrupted the pattern of human ecology along the Wabash and its tributaries for many of the watershed’s inhabitants. Supporters touted the projects’ economic and recreational benefits, while opponents experienced the change as a desecration of sacred space. The projects saved millions in property damage and perhaps many human lives, but at the cost of an enduring sense of place amid the advent of a new regime of scientific watershed management and state control over natural resources in the region.
117. Environment, Space, Place: Volume > 8 > Issue: 1
Emmanuel Yewah African Documentaries, Films, Texts, and Environmental Issues
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This study draws from theoretical environmental debates as well as a selection of films, documentaries, and texts to discuss Africans’ approaches to environmental and ecological problems. Furthermore, it highlights the various strategies that Africans have developed in their attempts to provide holistic and much more comprehensive responses to environmental challenges. Informed by African indigenous knowledge, those strategies do involve community-based micro-level initiatives, grassroots organizations, ancestral spirits, and use local languages or lingua franca to educate as well as prod the people’s consciousness about environmental and ecological issues.
118. Environment, Space, Place: Volume > 8 > Issue: 1
Roger Paden Landscapes and Evolutionary Aesthetics
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This essay examines the possibility of developing a more complete evolutionary aesthetics that can be used to appraise both natural landscapes and works of landscape architects. For the purpose of this essay, an “evolutionary aesthetics” is an aesthetic theory that is closely connected to Darwin’s theory of evolution. Two types of Darwinian evolutionary aesthetics seem possible; a theory of evolved tastes, such as that developed by Dennis Dutton, and an aesthetics of evolving nature based on Carlson’s positive aesthetics. After, exploring both theories, I argue that, while the two positions approach aesthetics from different directions, they support similar aesthetic judgments concerning landscapes, and this suggests that the two positions might be incorporated into a broader theory of evolutionary aesthetics. That theory is briefly outlined and applied to both natural landscapes and parks.
119. Environment, Space, Place: Volume > 8 > Issue: 1
John Kaiser Ortiz Barnyards and Birkenstocks: Why Farmers and Environmentalists Need Each Other
120. Environment, Space, Place: Volume > 8 > Issue: 1
Derek Shanahan The View from the Train: Cities and Other Landscapes