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101. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy: Volume > 19 > Issue: 2
Francisco J. Gonzalez "I Have to Live in Eros": Heidegger's 1932 Seminar on Plato's Phaedrus
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Heidegger’s recently published 1932 seminar on Plato’s Phaedrus arguably represents his most successful dialogue with Plato, where such dialogue is characterized by both the deepest affinity and the most incisive opposition. The central thesis of Heidegger’s interpretation is that the Phaedrus is not simply a logos about eros, but rather an attempt to show that eros is the very essence of logos and that logos is thereby in its very essence dia-logue. Heidegger is thus here more attuned than ever before to the erotic and dialogical character of philosophy while at the same time concerned with how this conception of philosophy can lead to the eclipse of being and truth.
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102. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy: Volume > 19 > Issue: 2
Theodore George Letter from the Edtior
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103. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy: Volume > 19 > Issue: 2
Robert D. Metcalf The Situation of Epistemology in Plato’s Theaetetus
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While it may be controversial to categorize Plato’s Theatetetus as “epistemological,” given what is implied by this term, the dialogue does offer a discourse on knowledge, at least in the minimal sense of questioning knowledge. But more than that, the dialogue “situates” its questioning, and its critical examination of attempted definitions of knowledge, in two ways that are particularly illuminating: first, its dramatization of Socrates coming-to-know Theaetetus through philosophical dialogue; second, its taking for granted a whole array of epistemic practices and keeping them in view, peripherally, throughout the discussion. The most interesting example of the latter is found in the famous Digression of the Theaetetus, where the difference between philosophy and rhetoric is understood in terms of the knowledge/lack-of-knowledge belonging to each.
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104. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy: Volume > 2 > Issue: 1
Ben Vedder Schleiermacher’s Idea of Hermeneutics and the Feeling of Absolute Dependence
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105. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy: Volume > 2 > Issue: 1
John Protevi Violence and Authority in Kant
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106. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy: Volume > 2 > Issue: 1
Rudi Visker Un-European Desires: Toward a Provincialism without Romanticism
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107. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy: Volume > 2 > Issue: 1
John Sallis Of the Χώρα
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108. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy: Volume > 2 > Issue: 1
Fabio Ciaramelli The Loss of Origin and Heidegger’s Question of Unheimlichkeit
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109. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy: Volume > 2 > Issue: 2
Philippe Van Haute Michel Foucault: Psychoanalysis and the Problem of the Law
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110. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy: Volume > 2 > Issue: 2
Jean-Luc Marion The End of the End of Metaphysics
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111. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy: Volume > 2 > Issue: 2
Paul J. M. Van Tongeren Nietzsche’s Transfiguration of History: Historicality as Transfiguration
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112. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy: Volume > 20 > Issue: 1
Daniel L. Tate Renewing the Question of Beauty: Gadamer on Plato’s Idea of the Beautiful
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Posing the question of beauty anew, Gadamer pursues a hermeneutic remembrance of the original relation of beauty and truth forgotten by modern aesthetics. For Gadamer, the essential relation of kalos and aletheia is preserved, above all, in Plato. This essay elaborates his retrieval of Plato, re-thinking the splendor of beauty and the illumination of truth from being as an event of coming-to-presence. After discussing his engagement with Heidegger the essay reconstructs Gadamer’s interpretative argument, showing how he interprets the transcendence, radiance, and measure that characterize Plato’s idea of the beautiful as structural features of being as an event of truth.
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113. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy: Volume > 20 > Issue: 1
Tanja Staehler The Refuge of the Good in the Beautiful
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In the Platonic dialogues, the enigmatic concept of the good tends to retreat at those very moments when it is supposed to show itself. This paper examines the relation between the beautiful and the good as the good takes refuge in the beautiful. Hans-Georg Gadamer holds a particular interest in these retreats since they show that there is actually an emphasis on appearances and the human good in Plato. In contrast, Emmanuel Levinas is critical of the primacy of vision and the beautiful from an ethical perspective. The relevant passages in the dialogues will be interpreted with respect to this divergence.
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114. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy: Volume > 20 > Issue: 1
Susanna Lindberg Lost in the World of Technology with and after Heidegger
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Is Heidegger’s theory of the era of technology a sufficent hermeneutics of contemporary globalization? It remains invaluable because it understands technology in terms of transcendence, and transcencence in terms of being-in-the-world. But should it nevertheless be revised in the context of contemporary social and technological environment? This article shows firstly how Heidegger’s general idea of being-in-the-world is specified in his theory of technology, and how technology reduces man and nature into “natural resources” and being into elemental techno-nature. Secondly, the article presents two types of critique to Heidegger’s idea: on the one hand, Ihde, Latour and Stiegler question Heidegger’s understanding of technology as a total system; on the other hand, Foucault and Eldred question Heidegger’s understanding of technology independently of social and economical structures. The article suggests that re-interpreted through these critiques, the theory of technology gives a good basis for an ontology of contemporary “uprooted” existence.
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115. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy: Volume > 20 > Issue: 1
Gordon Hull Building Better Citizens: Hobbes Against the Ontological Illusion
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Hobbes rejects the Aristotelian political animal, a move that enables a malleable psychology in which we are driven by our passions and responses to external objects. Our psychology is accordingly overdetermined by our socio-cultural environment, and managing that environment becomes a central task of the state. A particular problem is what I call the “ontological illusion,” the constitutive human tendency to ontologize products of the imagination. I argue that Hobbes’s strategies for managing the ontological illusion govern part four of Leviathan. Those chapters are intended to convince elites that crediting ontological illusions in policy is disastrous, as his discussion of demonology and its thinly veiled references to witchcraft persecutions readily illustrates.
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116. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy: Volume > 20 > Issue: 1
Rodrigo Sebastián Braicovich The Approach to the Problem of Comprehension in Roman Stoicism
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Throughout the sources that have come down to us from the Roman period of the Stoic school, we find an important number of therapeutical practices that can be clearly linked to other schools (such as Pythagoreanism, Platonism, Cynicism or Epicureanism) and can be consequently seen to constitute (part of) the common ground that enables the idea that there is a general Hellenistic approach to the problem of philosophy as therapy. I will argue that a subset of those strategies, which I will refer to as repetition, ascetic and visualization practices, can be better understood as part of an approach to the problem of comprehension, a new approach which, contrary to what may seem at first glance, is fully consistent with the intellectualist conception of human agency defended by both Early and Roman Stoics. I will further suggest that this new approach to the notion of comprehension may be interpreted as an expression of dissatisfaction with the Early Stoic excessively abstract approach to the problem of knowledge.
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117. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy: Volume > 20 > Issue: 1
James Luchte Of Freedom: Heidegger on Spinoza
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In this essay, I will explore the much neglected relationship between Heidegger and Spinoza—and thus of Heidegger and the modern sense of freedom. The free man, for Spinoza, is one who has not only cultivated the stronger active emotion of acquiescence to the univocal chorus of necessity, but has also learned to disengage external factors which are coincident with such passive emotions—to organise an ‘order of encounters’ as Deleuze describes in his Expressionism. Heidegger, on the contrary, who undertakes a meditation upon ‘Spinozism’ in the context of his 1936 lecture course, Schelling’s Treatise on Freedom, would seem to take issue with Spinoza in his own contention that the one who faces his or her ownmost possibility of death without evasion, is the one who is most free—or, who will have found him or herself in a moment that discloses the necessity of one’s own singular freedom. It will be in the context of this divergence between substance and event that I will argue that Spinoza’s notion of freedom as it consists in the acquiescence to substance is a falsification of human existence for the sake of a hedonistic escapism.
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118. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy: Volume > 20 > Issue: 1
Bryan Lueck Tact as Ambiguous Imperative: Merleau-Ponty, Kant, and Moral Sense-Bestowal
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I argue in this paper that some of the most basic commitments of Kantian ethics can be understood as grounded in the dynamic of sense that Maurice Merleau-Ponty describes in his Phenomenology of Perception. Specifically, I argue that Merleau-Ponty’s account supports the importance of universalizability as a test for the moral permissibility of particular acts as well as the idea that the binding character of the moral law is given as something like a fact of reason. But I also argue that Merleau-Ponty’s account of reversibility suggests an important dimension of moral experience that is given in the experience of contact and that is underthematized in moral philosophies like Kant’s that emphasize the role of universalizability.
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119. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy: Volume > 20 > Issue: 1
Roland Végsö Perpetual Final Judgment: Giorgio Agamben and the Desctruction of Judgment
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The article examines the role of the Last Judgment in Giorgio Agamben’s philosophy. It argues that the central ontological structure of Agamben’s early thought is that of the perpetually occurring origin. The figure of the perpetual final judgment captures precisely this ontological structure. In order to explicate this figure, the article examines Agamben’s relation to the Heideggerian project of the “destruction of judgment” in two steps. First, it examines the way Agamben turns the methodology of “destruction” into the project of “decreation.” Second, it examines the Agambenian critique of judgment in terms of the perpetually occurring Last Judgment. The essay concludes with a brief examination of the Homo Sacer project and argues that “bare life” should be understood as life lived under this perpetual final judgment.
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120. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy: Volume > 20 > Issue: 1
Beau Shaw Semele’s Ashes: Heidegger’s Interpretation of Hölderlin’s "As when on a holiday . . ."
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This paper is an elaboration of Paul de Man’s critique, in “Heidegger’s Exegeses of Hölderlin,” of Martin Heidegger’s commentary on Friedrich Hölderlin’s poem, “As when on a holiday…” I show that de Man’s critique can be expanded into a critique of a type of testimony that Heidegger ascribes to Hölderlin’s poem. Heidegger ascribes to Hölderlin’s poem what I call “infinite testimony,” but, thereby, suppresses in the poem another type of testimony—what I call “finite testimony. This suppression is most in evidence in Heidegger’s interpretation of Hölderlin’s reference to the myth of Semele, as well as in Heidegger’s excision, in the version of the poem that he printed in the commentary, of the concluding lines of the poem. Additionally, I discuss the political implications of Heidegger’s suppression of the finite testimony depicted in “As when on a holiday . . .”
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