Narrow search


By category:

By publication type:

By language:

By journals:

By document type:


Displaying: 1-20 of 49 documents

0.126 sec

1. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 3
Sophie-Jan Arrien Faith’s Knowledge: On Heidegger’s Reading of Saint Paul
2. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 3
Raoni Padui From the Facticity of Dasein to the Facticity of Nature: Naturalism, Animality, and the Ontological Difference
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
There have been two prominent ways of thinking about the relationship between phenomenology and naturalism: the first and more traditional way, in continuity with Husserl’s critique of psychologism, exhibits the incompatibility of phenomenology with all forms of naturalism and positivism; the second and more recent interpretive strategy attempts to naturalize phenomenology and make it consistent with current scientific accounts of consciousness and intentionality. In this paper I argue that despite the fact that Heidegger followed the first path and remained critical of naturalism and positivism throughout his career, there are important moments in the late twenties where his project of a phenomenological ontology is challenged by problems pertaining to naturalism. I show how the question of determining the essence of life and animality as well as the overturning of ontology into metontology offer significant methodological hurdles for Heidegger’s fundamental ontology.
3. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 4
Graeme Nicholson Truth and Unconcealedness
4. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 4
Musa Duman Questioning and the Divine in Heidegger’s Beiträge
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
In this paper, I explore a number of basic themes surrounding the issue of the last god in Heidegger’s Beiträge. I first examine the significance Heidegger attaches to “questioning” in this regard. Questioning, I suggest, is the ground upon which the preparation for the Ereignis of the last god (“grounding”) is to be exercised. Heidegger sees himself working on the path to a futural thinking (the inceptual thinking), one in which metaphysics would be left behind, but we can see that this task that Heidegger sets before thinking, once taken place, corresponds to a supreme historical moment for the West, namely the other beginning as the passing-by of the last god. Thinking becomes essential only in orienting itself towards such historical possibility. This unique moment of the last god (“passing-by”) grounds its hinting presence that attunes/determines the historical world of the other beginning. I discuss in detail the implications of this perspective laid out in the Beiträge.
5. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 4
Theodore Kisiel The Paradigm Shifts of Hermeneutic Phenomenology: From Breakthrough to the Meaning-Giving Source
6. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 4
James Bahoh Heidegger’s Differential Concept of Truth in Beiträge
7. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 5
Peter Trawny Heidegger, “World Judaism,” and Modernity
8. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 5
Adam Knowles Heidegger’s Mask: Silence, Politics, and the Banality of Evil in the Black Notebooks
9. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 5
Jesús Adrián Escudero Heidegger’s Black Notebooks and the Question of Anti-Semitism
10. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 5
Anthony J. Steinbock Heidegger, Machination, and the Jewish Question: The Problem of the Gift
11. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 5
Joshua Rayman Heidegger’s “Nazism” as Veiled Nietzscheanism and Heideggerianism: Evidence from the Black Notebooks
12. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 6
Lawrence J. Hatab The Point of Language in Heidegger’s Thinking: A Call for the Revival of Formal Indication
13. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 6
Shane M. Ewegen The Thing and I: Thinking Things in Heidegger’s Country Path Conversations
14. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 6
Ryan Johnson Thinking the Abyss of History: Heidegger’s Critique of Hegelian Metaphysics
15. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 6
Timothy Sean Quinn Heidegger and Jünger: Nihilism and the Fate of Europe
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
In the 1930s, Martin Heidegger began what would become a lifelong engagement with the work of Ernst Jünger. Part of Heidegger’s interest in Jünger was a result of Jünger’s Nietzsche-inspired cultural diagnosis; in Heidegger’s words, Jünger “makes all previous writings about Nietzsche inessential.” On the other hand, Heidegger was critical of what he deemed Jünger’s “bedazzlement” before the thought of Nietzsche. In this essay, I explore the sources of Heidegger’s interest and his criticism of Jünger’s work. To do this, I focus on elements of their correspondence, but mainly on Jünger’s essay “Über die Linie” of 1950 and Heidegger’s response, “Über ‘die Linie’” of 1955. In so doing, I hope to uncover their shared concern for the fate of Europe at the hands of a nihilism of which World War II was, to them, but an expression.
16. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 6
Derek Aggleton The Disunity of Factical Life: An Ethical Development in Heidegger’s Early Work
17. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 6
Krzysztof Ziarek On Heidegger’s Einmaligkeit Again: The Single Turn of the Event
18. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 6
Bret W. Davis Heidegger on the Way from Onto-Historical Ethnocentrism to East-West Dialogue
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
Heidegger often asserted that Germany, as “the land of poets and thinkers,” has a central world-historical role to play in any possible recovery from the technological nihilism of the modern epoch. And yet, on numerous occasions, Heidegger also demonstrated a serious interest in dialogue with the East Asian traditions of Daoism and Zen Buddhism. How are Heidegger’s entrenched ethnocentrism and his interest in East-West dialogue related? While neither can be wholly confined to one or another period in his thought, this article shows how, in the late 1930s, Heidegger begins to recover from the most ethnocentric period of his thought, and how he starts thinking of his reflections on the Western history of being as a preparation for what he came to call “the inevitable dialogue with the East Asian world.”
19. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 7
Rebecca A. Longtin Heidegger and the Poetics of Time
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
Heidegger’s engagement with the poet Friedrich Hölderlin often dwells on the issue of temporality. For Heidegger, Hölderlin is the most futural thinker (zukünftigster Denker) whose poetry is necessary for us now and must be wrested from being buried in the past. Heidegger frames his reading of Hölderlin in terms of past, present, and future and, more importantly, describes him as being able to poetize time. This paper examines what it means to poetize time and why Hölderlin’s poetry in particular allows us to understand temporality as the interplay of presence and non-presence.
20. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 7
Scott M. Campbell The Catastrophic Essence of the Human Being in Heidegger’s Readings of Antigone