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11. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 5 > Issue: 12
Undecidable Difference: A Derridian Conception of Animal Difference in Animal Lessons
12. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 5 > Issue: 12
Colin Irvine A Land-Based Approach to Postcolonial, Post-Modern Novels
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With an eye on how post-colonial novels by authors Chinua Achebe and Ngugi Wa Thiong’o address aesthetic and environmental problems that preceded the Modern period, the intent of this essay is to emphasize how their fiction connects readers with a pre-industrial, premodern, and, strangely enough, radically new ways of thinking about books and the living world beyond them. To this end, the essay looks at this non-western literature through the lens of ecologist Aldo Leopold’s land-based ideas regarding epistemology, ethics, and ecology.
13. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 5 > Issue: 12
Contributors
14. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 5 > Issue: 12
Justin Litaker Deleuze and Cinema in the Digital
15. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 5 > Issue: 12
Paul Kintzele Voyaging Out: The Woolfs and Internationalism
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This article contends that no understanding of Virginia Woolf’s fiction is complete without an examination of the political environment in which Woolf operated, particularly with regard to the perennially vexing but urgent question of international relations. Leonard Woolf’s involvement with the creation of the League of Nations and his lifelong commitment to internationalist politics bear direct relevance to Woolf’s novels, which further that same project by enlarging the political imagination and by demonstrating the profound, if often overlooked, interconnectedness of human activity. It is through this mixing of registers–the politics of the abstractly large and the mundanely small–that Virginia Woolf’s fiction resonates most powerfully and carries its strongest anti-nationalistic charge.
16. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 5 > Issue: 12
Yubraj Aryal Editorial - Affective Criticism of Literature: Recasting Social in a New Key of Affects
17. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 5 > Issue: 12
John F. DeCarlo The Poisoning of Hamlet’s Temporal Subjectivity
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The paper addresses the question: why and how does Hamlet lose track of time in the Prayer-Closet scene sequence? While Deleuze aptly notes the poetic formula “the time is out of joint” is indicative of time no longer being subordinate to cyclical rhythms of nature, or as Polonius asserts: “Time is time”(II.ii.88), but rather movement being subordinated to time, it is argued that the HAMLET text goes further in its pre-figuration of Kant’s concept that time is a mysteriously autonomous form. More specifically, it is explicated that in a Kantian sense Hamlet's temporary identification with the Ghost’s categorical sense of whatis possible and impossible in accordance with the passage of outer time is what causes Hamlet’s temporal confusion.
18. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 5 > Issue: 12
Anita Alkhas Heidegger in Plain Sight: “The Origin of the Work of Art” and Marcel Duchamp
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Duchamp’s aspiration to become more philosophical in his art mirrors Heidegger’s aspiration to become more poetical in his philosophy. Their shared mistrust of subjectivity led them to question the continued viability of art on the one hand and of philosophy on the other. This article examines Heidegger’s essay in juxtaposition to Duchamp’s work, highlighting Heidegger’s (often underappreciated) playful approach to his weighty task, and, in regard to Duchamp, revealing just how serious art can be when it doesn’t appear to take itself too seriously.
19. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 5 > Issue: 12
Kwame Anthony Appiah Cosmopolitism and Issues of Ethical Identity
20. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 5 > Issue: 12
Kelly Oliver Media Representations of Women and the “Iraq War”
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This essay examines media images of women in recent conflicts in the Middle East. From the Abu Ghraib prison abuses to protests in Iran, women have become the public face of violence, carried out and suffered. Women’s bodies are figured as sexual and violent, a potent combination that stirs public imagination and feeds into stereotypes of women as femme fatales or “bombshells.”