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1. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 44 > Issue: 4
Dylan Small Anderson, Orcid-ID Ted Shear Orcid-ID Beyond Fake News: Finding the Truth in a World of Misinformation, by Justin P. McBrayer
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2. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 44 > Issue: 4
Russell Marcus Philosophy Camps for Youth: Everything You Wanted to Know about Starting, Organizing, and Running a Philosophy Camp. Edited by Claire Elise Katz
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3. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 44 > Issue: 4
Dennis Earl UNgrading: Why Rating Students Undermines Learning (and What to Do Instead). Edited by Susan D. Blum
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4. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 44 > Issue: 4
Susan Mills Exploring the Philosophy of Death and Dying: Classical and Contemporary Perspectives. Edited by Michael Cholbi and Travis Timmerman
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5. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 44 > Issue: 4
Jules Taylor, Katherine Thomson-Jones Big Thinkers and Big Ideas: An Introduction to Eastern and Western Philosophy for Kids, by Sharon Kaye; Children’s Book of Philosophy, by Sarah Tomley and Marcus Weeks; Philosophy for Kids: 40 Fun Questions that Help You Wonder about Everything!, by David White; Big Ideas for Young Thinkers, by Jamia Wilson
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6. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 44 > Issue: 4
Patrick F. Walsh Orcid-ID AI Ethics, by Mark Coeckelbergh
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7. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 44 > Issue: 4
Tricia Van Dyk Changing the Subject: Philosophy from Socrates to Adorno, by Raymond Geuss
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8. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 44 > Issue: 4
Index to Volume 44 (2021)
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9. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 44 > Issue: 4
Vaughn Bryan Baltzly Trolleyology as First Philosophy: A Puzzle-Centered Approach to Introducing the Discipline
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Though sometimes maligned, “trolleyology” offers an effective means of opening and framing, not only classes in ethics, but indeed any introductory philosophy course taking a broadly “puzzle-based” approach. When properly sequenced, a subset of the thought experiments that are trolleyology’s stock-in-trade can generate a series of puzzles illustrating the shortcomings of our untutored moral intuitions, and which thus motivate the very enterprise of moral theorizing. Students can be engaged in the attempt to resolve said puzzles, inasmuch as they’re accessible and compelling, and their resolutions generally easy to achieve. Once thus engaged, students can be directed to the fact that (perhaps unbeknownst to them) they had already rolled up their sleeves and begun “doing philosophy.” In this way, engagement with trolleyological puzzles can serve as a “microcosm” for philosophy more broadly, illustrating the processes of critical thinking that are likewise the stock-in-trade of philosophers across many different domains of inquiry.
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10. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 44 > Issue: 4
Irwin Y. S. Chan Should Talking be Allowed during Exams?: Fairness and Value of Group Exams
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In a group exam, students first do an exam individually and then redo the same exam in small groups. Studies have shown that group exams provide a number of benefits, including improvements in performance, learning, motivation, and preparation, as well as a reduction in anxiety. However, little has been written on whether group exams are fair. This paper aims to discuss and reject three fairness concerns that arise from (i) improved performance, (ii) improved learning, and (iii) accessibility. It also discusses in detail the benefits of improved learning, arguing that they are the most valuable benefit which makes group exams particularly suitable for philosophy education.
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11. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 44 > Issue: 4
Elizabeth Bell Orcid-ID Participation Grades: An Argument for Self-Assessments, the Potential to Reproduce Inequalities, and Preventive Suggestions
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I argue that instructor-graded participation assessments, which are one of the most popular ways to incentivize classroom participation, either fail to satisfactorily assess student participation or are open to issues of unconscious instructor bias. I then argue that a better way to assess participation is to use student self-assessments. Student-self assessments not only avoid these issues, but also have other added benefits like cultivating student self-reflection which is associated with academic gains. However, self-assessments pose new worries about under confidence biases and cultural differences for some students from diverse backgrounds. This is particularly worrisome since many students in these situations are already vulnerable to systemic biases. If there is a possibility that self-assessments might reinforce inequalities, great care needs to be taken in how they are designed and implemented. I then present a way to approach student self-assessment surveys and ways to frame classroom participation to help lessen the chance that these self-assessments will reinforce inequalities.
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12. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 44 > Issue: 4
Paul D’Ambrosio, Dimitra Amarantidou, Tim Connolly Teaching (Chinese/Non-Western) Philosophy as Philosophy: The Humble Gatekeeper
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In this paper we argue that the approach for teaching non-Western, and specifically Chinese philosophy to undergraduate Western students, does not have to be significantly different than that for teaching philosophies from “Western” traditions. Four areas will be explored. Firstly, we look at debates on teaching non-Western philosophy from the perspective of themes or traditions, suggesting that, as an overarching guideline, it is mote discussion. Secondly, in terms of making generalizations, we argue that no more explanation of the “Chineseness” of Chinese philosophy be offered than the “Germanness” of German philosophy, or “Greekness” of Greek philosophy. Thirdly, that lines of philosophical coherences are not limited to regional or cultural bounds. Finally, that foreign language be used in a way that invites understanding and does not close ideas off to students. In sum, we suggest applying well proven methods of teaching “Western” philosophy to Chinese (and other “Non-Western”) philosophies. After all, value of Chinese and other “Non-Western” philosophies comes not from their being “Chinese” or “Non-Western,” but from being philosophical.
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13. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 44 > Issue: 4
Christopher Edelman Orcid-ID Dialectical Facts: A Useful Approximation
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This article attempts to contribute to the literature on what has become known as “student relativism” by suggesting that in many cases it is a symptom of a broader and equally problematic pre-reflective epistemological framework that students often bring with them to the study of philosophy. It goes on to describe the notion of a “dialectical fact,” and to propose that this concept can be a useful pedagogical tool for helping students to progress beyond that framework.
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14. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 42 > Issue: 1
Frank Boardman The Norton Introduction to Philosophy, Second Edition, edited by Gideon Rosen, Alex Byrne, Joshua Cohen, Elizabeth Harman, and Seana Shiffrin
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15. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 42 > Issue: 1
Susan T. Gardner In Community of Inquiry with Ann Margaret Sharp: Childhood, Philosophy, and Education, edited by Maughn Rollins Gregory and Megan Jane Laverty
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16. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 42 > Issue: 1
Liz Goodnick Observations upon Experimental Philosophy Abridged, with Related Texts, by Margaret Cavendish; edited by Eugene Marshall
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17. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 42 > Issue: 1
Gregory Havrilak Espionage, Statecraft, and the Theory of Reporting: A Philosophical Essay on Intelligence Management, by Nicholas Rescher
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18. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 42 > Issue: 1
William B. Irvine How to Be a Stoic: Using Ancient Philosophy to Live a Modern Life, by Massimo Pigliucci
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19. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 42 > Issue: 1
Joy Laine The Nyaya-sutra: Selections with Early Commentaries, by Matthew Dasti and Stephen Phillips
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20. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 42 > Issue: 1
Antonio Ramirez Giving Reasons: An Extremely Short Introduction to Critical Thinking, by David R. Morrow
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