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1. Raven: A Journal of Vexillology: Volume > 1
Anne M. Platoff Where No Flag Has Gone Before: Political and Technical Aspects of Placing a Flag on the Moon
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How, exactly, did the Apollo 11 astronauts come to deploy a U.S. flag on the lunar surface? This paper explores the technical aspects and international considerations surrounding that $5.50 flag.
2. Raven: A Journal of Vexillology: Volume > 1
Alistair B. Fraser A Canadian Flag for Canada
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While 95 years separate the adoption of Canada’s inaugural flag and the adoption of its National flag, the maple-leaf trail connecting one to the other is continuous. The author summarizes Canadian flag history with a cogent narrative running from 1870 to 1965.
3. Raven: A Journal of Vexillology: Volume > 1
James J. Ferrigan III “Battle Born” Vexillology: The Nevada State Flag and Its Predecessors
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Nevada has had the dubious distinction of having had more official flags than any other state in the union. Those designs receive detailed scrutiny and description: the Sparks-Day Flag of 1905, the Crisler Flag of 1915, the Schellback Design of 1929, and the Raggio Modification of 1991, in which the author played a key role.
4. Raven: A Journal of Vexillology: Volume > 1
Don Healy Evolutionary Vexillography: One Flag’s Influence in Modern Design
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Some flags influence the designs of others. This paper traces the “family tree” of the red-white-blue horizontal tribar of the Netherlands through five major lines: New Amsterdam, Russian, South African, French, and Dutch, asserting direct ancestry or at least influence for over a hundred flags.
5. Raven: A Journal of Vexillology: Volume > 1
John H. Gámez The Controversy Over the Alamo Battle Flag
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No eyewitness described in specific detail what flag or flags flew over the Alamo. One candidate, the guidon of the New Orleans Greys, is held in a museum collection in Mexico and its return has been eagerly sought by Texas politicians and other activists for many years. This article explores the history of the flag and the obstacles to its return.
6. Raven: A Journal of Vexillology: Volume > 1
Kevin Harrington Vexillaria
7. Raven: A Journal of Vexillology: Volume > 1
Scot M. Guenter Raven
8. Raven: A Journal of Vexillology: Volume > 11
Peter Ansoff The First Navy Jack
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While the rattlesnake-and-stripes flag that currently flies on the bow of every U.S. warship has a long tradition in American flag use, its design was a 19th-century mistake based on an erroneous 1776 engraving. This paper explores the history of the flag that never existed.
9. Raven: A Journal of Vexillology: Volume > 11
Bruce Patterson, Saguenay Herald Constructing Canadian Symbolism: National Identity as Expressed in Canadian Heraldic Authority Grants
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The author explores the broad range of Canadian symbols in grants of arms and flags over the past 15 years, going well beyond variations on the maple leaf to the animals, objects, flowers, and colors used by individuals and organizations to represent Canada. This paper was originally delivered as the keynote speech at the Association’s 37th annual meeting.
10. Raven: A Journal of Vexillology: Volume > 11
Scot Guenter Micronesian Flag Cultures: An Exercise in Comparative Vexillogy
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The author draws on his work in the field to explore flag use across Guam, Palau, and the Federated States of Micronesia. His comparative analysis examines the significance of flags within the broader context of an emergent civil religion within the political cultures of three different but adjacent political entities.