Narrow search


By category:

By publication type:

By language:

By journals:

By document type:


Displaying: 1-20 of 380 documents

0.051 sec

1. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1
Erik Baldwin The Hiddenness Argument: Philosophy’s New Challenge to Belief in God
2. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1
William Lane Craig Necessary Beings: An Essay on Ontology, Modality, and the Relations between Them
3. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1
Matthew D. Wright Commentary on Thomas Aquinas’s Treatise on Law
4. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1
Elijah Hess The Mechanics of Divine Foreknowledge and Providence: A Time-Ordering Account
5. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
William Lane Craig Graham Oppy on Infinity: A Review Essay on Philosophical Perspectives on Infinity
6. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
William Lane Craig Einführung in die Religionsphilosophie
7. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
Patrick T. Smith Introducing Apologetics: Cultivating Christian Commitment
8. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
Robert Llizo The Cambridge Companion to Arabic Philosophy; The Cambridge Companion to Medieval Jewish Philosophy
9. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
Adam Barkman Narnia, Cambridge, and Joy: 1950–1963. Volume 3 of The Collected Letters of C. S. Lewis
10. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 10 > Issue: 2
David C. Cramer Nancey Murphy on Personal Identity and Eschatological Resurrection: A Review Essay of Bodies and Souls, or Spirited Bodies?
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
In this paper I discuss Nancey Murphy’s nonreductive physicalist perspective on personal identity and eschatological resurrection offered in her recent work, Bodies and Souls, or Spirited Bodies? I argue that if we take Murphy to be presenting actual metaphysical positions on these issues, it is very difficult to see how they go together coherently. Contrary to Murphy’s explicit claim to be presenting metaphysical criteria for personal identity, I argue that it appears she is instead offering an epistemological or psychological account of identity. I conclude that Murphy may need to modify or reject either her criteria for personal numerical identity or her view of the resurrection in order to consistently hold the other. Alternately, she could view this inconsistency as a failure of the underlying physicalist assumptions of her “scientific research program” and thus reject her physicalist assumptions altogether.
11. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 10 > Issue: 2
William Lane Craig Arguing about Gods
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
Graham Oppy’s Arguing about Gods is a wide-ranging and penetrating critique of the arguments of natural theology. Essential to Oppy’s project of showing that there are no successful theistic arguments is his account of success in argumentation. Oppy’s account not only sets the bar unrealistically high but also appears to be self-defeating, since Oppy fails to provide a successful argument for the truth of his account. Nonetheless, natural theologians cannot afford to ignore Oppy’s criticisms of their theistic arguments.
12. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 10 > Issue: 2
Antony Flew The God Delusion
13. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 10 > Issue: 2
Paul Copan God and Morality: A Philosophical History
14. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 10 > Issue: 2
Alan Wong Christ and Horrors: The Coherence of Christology
15. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 10 > Issue: 2
Matthew Carey Jordan Moral Fictionalism
16. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 10 > Issue: 2
Jason McMartin Religion and Friendly Fire: Examining Assumptions in Contemporary Philosophy of Religion
17. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 11 > Issue: 2
R. J. Snell Alvin Plantinga, Charles Taylor, and Apologetics in a Secular Age: A Review Essay
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
A critical evaluation of Deane-Peter Baker’s use of Charles Taylor to overcome perceived inadequacies in Reformed epistemology. Baker claims that a successful response to the de jure objection must provide motivation for the unbeliever to seriously consider the truth of Christianity, but this very test is undone by Taylor’s A Secular Age.
18. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 11 > Issue: 2
John W. Cooper Exaggerated Rumors of Dualism’s Demise: A Review Essay on Body, Soul, and Human Life
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
Green’s book outlines a wholistic vision of human nature, the Christian life, and life after death using “neuro-hermeneutics,” his approach to biblical interpretation integrated with neuroscience and psychology. He argues that a comprehensive vision of Christianity implies body-soul monism and undermines dualism. I respond that these sciences are consistent with dualist as well as monist anthropologies. I examine his exegetical arguments for anthropological monism from the eschatological texts of Luke–Acts and the Corinthian epistles, find them wanting, and show why they actually imply dualism. I conclude that Green has neither undermined dualism nor warranted monism.
19. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 11 > Issue: 2
David Cramer Alvin Plantinga
20. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 11 > Issue: 2
Bruce Ballard A Secular Age