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1. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 1
Chandana Chakrabarti The Dialectic of Negation in the Vedantic and the Platonic Traditions
2. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 1
Stephen H. Phillips The Error of "That": Gaṅgeśa on the Epistemology of the Memory Cognition "That" (tad id)
3. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 1
Kisor K. Chakrabarti AAtmatattvaviveka (Analysis of the Nature of the Self) An Annotated Translation: Introduction of the Buddhist Doctrine of Momentariness
4. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 1
Lobsang Gyatso, Michael Krausz Interview With Ven. Lobsang Gyatso
5. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 1
Mark Siderits Do Persons Supervene on Skandhas?
6. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 1
Steven W. Laycock An Untimely History of Sartrean Temporality: A Tale, Told by a Buddhist...Signifying Nothing
7. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 1
Ramakrishna Puligandla Immanence and Transcendence in the Upanishadic Teaching
8. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 1
Jay L. Garfield Emptiness and Positionlessness: Do the Mādhyamika Relinquish all Views?
9. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 10
Thom Brooks Better Luck Next Time: A Comparative Analysis of Socrates and Mahāyāna Buddhism on Reincarnation
10. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 10
Eve Mullen Teaching the Ineffable: Nirgima Brahman in the Philosophy of Religion Classroom
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In the undergraduate Philosophy of Religion classroom, a primary topic of discussion is the attributes of God. Personal experience as a teacher has shown that Śamkara's concept of Brahman without attributes {nirguna), a contrast to traditional Western ideas of the Divine, facilitates the learning process and broadens general conceptualizations of the Divine or Ultimate Reality. The teaching pedagogy associated with the use of this concept is explored here. Some basic questions are key. How can the concept of Brahman without attributes be presented to a novice western audience? How can the discussion of the concept be integrated practically in a Philosophy of Religion course? The nirguna concept is invaluable for the constructive broadening of perspective and thorough treatment of the general topics at hand in Philosophy of Religion. It is by incorporating a cross-cultural understanding of Śamkara's absolute that the semester-long exploration of "alternate" views on divinity or ultimate reality can culminate in a greater grasp of not only Śamkara-based views on Brahman the Absolute, but also of Western views on a monotheistic God.When requested to prepare this paper for publication, I realized that my own request to the audience at the SIPR Calcutta conference would have to be translated from the intimate and immediate context of a room filled with friendly faces to the distanced context of readers. The request I made was simple, however, and I trust the reading audience will be as helpful as my colleagues in the conference room were. This paper is meant to stimulate discussion. Presented here is a collection of suggestions for the Philosophy of Religion classroom, and as improving one's teaching skills is an ongoing, never-ending process, I do hope all readers will add any opinions or criticisms to the discourse and regard this piece not as a final statement but as a starting point for useful lesson planning. My aim is simply to offer some pedagogical starting points, centering on the use of Śamkara on an introductory level, in the specific course context of Philosophy of Religion.In the undergraduate. Western Philosophy of Religion classroom, a primary topic of discussion is the attributes of God. Personal experience as a teacher has shown that Śamkara's concept of nirguna Brahman ("without attributes") facilitates the learning process and general conceptualizations of the Divine and Ultimate Reality. The teaching pedagogy associated with the use of this concept is the focus here. Some basic questions are key. How can the concept of Brahman without attributes be presented to a novice Western audience? How can the discussion of the concept be integrated practically in a Philosophy of Religion course? What specific teaching methods can be employed successfully in this context? The nirguna concept is invaluable for the cultivation of analytical skills, for the constructive broadening of perspective, and for a thorough treatment of the general topics at hand in Philosophy of Religion. Foremost among these topics is "Describing the Divine." I draw upon current works on teaching pedagogy, primary and secondary works dealing with Śamkara's Advaita Vedānta and personal teaching experience in the Philosophy of Religion classroom.