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1. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 21 > Issue: 1
Jaime J. Marcio Thought Is Essentially An Action: Peirce and Rorty on Normal and Abnormal Discourse
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The close relationship that thinking bears to doing is perhaps the foundational idea in the plilosophy of education. This idea makes its first systematic appearance in the thought of Charles S. Peirce. In order to appreciate Peirce’s discovery, we cannot interpret hirn through the eyes of Richard Rorty, who obscures Peirce’s insight by making distinctions Peirce would have resisted. thought and action coincide most essentially in Peirce’s concept of the “scientific” method for fixing beliefs. This method is the most reliable guide for justifying thought because it requires humans to act upon the world. Only such action helps reveal a steadily friendlier and more dependable environment. Rorty misses this idea of Peirce’s in so far as he clings to a radically romantic conception of creativity.
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2. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 21 > Issue: 2
T. Ross Owen Call tor Papers: Critical Thinking & Adult Literacy; Critical Thinking & Family Literacy
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3. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 21 > Issue: 2
Ronald A. Beghetto Thinking about the Outside ot the Box: A Pedagogical Framework For Thinking Critically About Creativity
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Post-secondary students in the applied professions (e.g., business, education, psychology) often see the value of creativity to their future work, but have never had the opportunity to critically examine their assumptions about creativity. A more critically examined and substantiated understanding of creativity can go a long way in helping pre-professional students consider how creativity might be best applied and cultivated in their future professional work. The purpose of this article is to discuss how principles of critical thinking can be brought to bear on understanding creativity. First, a discussion of the importance of critically examining the basic assumptions surrounding creativity will be presented. Then, a pedagogical framework for incorporating critical thinking into the examination of creativity will follow. Finally, an example of how the model might: be used with post-secondary students will be presented, followed by a brief conclusion.
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4. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 21 > Issue: 2
Jonathan A. Plucker Introduction to the Special Issue on Giftedness and Critical Thinking
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5. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 21 > Issue: 2
Stuart N. Omdal, Jann Harper Leppien Thinking Skills in Gifted Education
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6. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 21 > Issue: 2
Jeffrey A. Nowak, Jonathan A. Plucker Do as I Say, Not as I Do?
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Problem-based leaming (PBL) is an increasingly popular curricular technique for developing academic and intellectual talent. Aligning PBL activities and subsequent student assessment often proves to be difficult for teachers, with many PBL activities followed by traditional, pencil-and-paper assessments. This misalignment confuses students by disrupting their understanding of teacher expectations. In this paper, we discuss the importance of instruction-assessment alignment during PBL and provide detailed examples of exemplary units.
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7. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 21 > Issue: 2
M. Neil Browne Call For Papers: Critical Thinking as an Interpersonal Experience
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8. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 21 > Issue: 3
Don Fawkes Reliance on Indicator Terms is not Critical Thinking
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9. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 21 > Issue: 3
Megan Laverty Philosophy
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10. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 21 > Issue: 3
Don Fawkes, Tom Adajian, Dan Flage Examining the Exam: A Critical Look at the Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal Exam
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This paper examines the content of the Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal exam. (1980) Our report is not a statistical review. We find the content of this exam defective in a number of areas. The exam consists of five “tests” of 16 questions for a total of 80 questions. Of these, we cannot recommend test 1, test 2, test 4, and test 5; and, we cannot recommend questions 4, 5, 14, 16,37, 45, 60, 63, 64, 65, 66, and 67. As shown in this report, the exam creates confusion and makes basic errors in critical thinking in a number of areas, and therefore, lacks content quality in these areas, Hence, no statistical results pertaining to the administration of these areas to students can be informative. We find the remaining areas acceptable as to content. But until the problems are corrected, we can only recommend that those who may use the exam remove the defective parts from test administration or from data collection and reporting. We recommend the former, because of the wasted time involved in the latter. This would amount to administering only 14 questions, i.e. test 3 with questions 37 and 45 eliminated.We also find the scope of the exam to be quite limited, but allow that this may be unavoidable for any instrument designed to be completed in about an hour. We further recommend the use of several tests, rather than one; and, that any such results be understood only as a measure of minimal competency (below which remediation likely is needed) for the skills tested, but not as an adequate measure of critical thinking.
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11. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 21 > Issue: 3
Christopher A. Pynes A Modern Analytic Socrates and Meno’s Paradox: A Dialogue
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12. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 21 > Issue: 3
William Irwin, Gregory Bassham Depression, Informal Fallacies, and Cognitive Therapy: The Critical Thinking Cure?
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13. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 21 > Issue: 3
Awad Ibrahim Thinking Critically, Choosing Politically: Anti-racism and/or Multiculturalism Education (?)
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14. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 21 > Issue: 3
John Follman, Danny O’Neal Critical Thinking 21st Century Computer Literature Search Databases in Nursing: Caveat Emptor
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15. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 21 > Issue: 4
Christopher H. Skinner Inquiry and Critical Thinking in School-Based Problem Solving: Behavioral Psychology in the Schools
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16. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 21 > Issue: 4
LaRonta M. Upson, Christopher H. Skinner A Demonstration of Class-wide Data-based Decision Making
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A teacher initially requested consultation services to address the behavior of three of her general education first grade students. This paper describes the decision rnaking process that led to the development of a class-wide intervention modeled after Barrish, Saunders, and Wolf’s (1969) Good Behavior Game. The paper focuses on how direct observation data, teacher and student input and preferences, andprevious research led to the development, implementation, and evaluation of an intervention that appeared to reduce disruptive behaviors across the entire class.
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17. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 21 > Issue: 4
Christine M. Bonfiglio, Edward J. Daly, III, Ruth A. Ervin Facilitating Teacher Inquiry Through Data-Based Behavioral Consultation and Functional Assessment in a Special Education Classroom
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This report describes a consultation case between a special education teacher and a school psychology student for a first grade student with a diagnosis of educable mental impairment. Adherence to data-based decision making and direct manipulation of hypothesized variables believed to be maintaining problem behaviors in the classroom revealed factors that were influencing the child’s behavior in the classroom. The teacher changed her behavior toward the student before a formal intervention plan could be developed and changes in student behavior were observed. Child outcomes were systematically measured. Also, the acceptability of the consultation process was assessed. Results are discussed in terms of the possible reactive effects to behavioral consultation and functional assessment that may occurfor teachers who see solutions enlerge during data-based consultative problem solving.
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18. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 21 > Issue: 4
Renee Oliver, Christopher H. Skinner Using Data-Based Decision Making to Develop and Evaluate an Intervention to Decrease Inappropriate Vocalizations and Increase Assignment Completion
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The current behavioral consultation case demonstrates how functional behavioral assessment (FBA) data, basic and applied research, teacher preferences, and contextual variables contribute to the decision making process when developing classroom intervention procedures. A male, African-American, fifth-grade general education student was initially referred for his inappropriate vocalizations duringtime designated for independent seatwork. FBA data suggested that this behavior was being reinforced with teacher attention. Additional data showed that he was failing to complete his assignments. An intervention was implemented where the student was given assignments one a time. He was instructed to solicit teacher attention and his next assignment after completing each assignment. Analysis ofteacher ratings for inappropriate vocalizations and assignment performance data suggest that the intervention was effective in increasing assignment completion and decreasing inappropriate verbalizations. Discussion focuses on how the various data playa role in the development and implementation of classroom intervention procedures.
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19. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 21 > Issue: 4
Gregg A. Johns How Behaviorists Treat Behavior Problems: Critical Thinking about Functional Analysis
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This article presents a description of the procedures used by behavioral psychologists to intervene with behavioral excesses and deficits in educational and clinical settings. Its focus is to provide a fundamental overview of these services for the educator and direct care staff. The discussion covers the topics of functional analysis, behavioral assessment, the Stimulus-Organismic-Response-Consequence model (SORC), positive and negative reinforcement, and treatment acceptability. The importance of the educator and direct care staff member’s participation in the development of implementation of behavioral interventions is emphasized.
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20. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 22 > Issue: 1
Michael D. Mumford, Devin C. Lonergan, Ginamarie Scott Evaluating Creative Ideas: Processes, Standards, and Context
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Although many new ideas are generated, only a few are ever implemented. Thus, it seems reasonable to conclude that idea evaluation represents an important aspect of the creative process. In the present article, we examine the cognitive operations involved in idea evaluation. We argue that idea evaluation is a complex activity involving appraisal of ideas, forecasting of their implications, and subsequent revision and refinement. We note that the outcomes of these activities depend on both the standards applied in idea evaluation and the context surrounding evaluation of a new idea. Implications for the development of idea evaluation skills are discussed.
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