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1. Heidegger Circle Proceedings: Volume > 48
Heidegger Abbreviations
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2. Heidegger Circle Proceedings: Volume > 48
Mathias Warnes Heidegger on Hölderlin’s Festival: The Wedding Dance as Inceptual Event
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After accounting for the holiday festival as a philosophical theme across Heidegger’s early to later writings, this paper summarizes the 1943 “Andenken” essay on Hölderlin’s “wedding festival” and 1959 “Hölderlin’s Earth and Heaven” essay on the “round dance.” It then explores how these motifs of the wedding and its round dance are in play in the 1936/7 Contributions to Philosophy: Of the Event manuscript, especially in its philosophy of attunement, and notion of the “celebration of the last god.”
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3. Heidegger Circle Proceedings: Volume > 48
Bradley Warfield Play as Polemos: Gadamer and Heidegger on the Truth-Disclosing Event
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Much has been written about Heidegger's various influences on Gadamer's thinking, especially as the latter culminates in Truth and Method. Scholars often point to the way Heidegger's notions of “thrownness” and “historicity” in Being and Time (BT) influence Gadamer's insistence on the centrality of tradition for hermeneutical understanding, and his notions of the “fusion of horizons” (horizontverschmelzung) and the “hermeneutic circle.”1 But scholars have appeared to overlook, or at least underestimate, the influence some of Heidegger's other notions have exerted on Gadamer's thought. In this paper I want to address crucial aspects of this neglect; I shall explore the relation between Heidegger's notion, as he explains it in Introduction to Metaphysics (IM), of truth as unconcealment (aletheia), and compare it to Gadamer's notion, as he describes it in Truth and Method, of truth as emergent, in play (Spiel), from the event (Ereignis) of conversation and of the work of art.
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4. Heidegger Circle Proceedings: Volume > 48
Nate Zuckerman Heidegger on Dasein’s Ways of Being
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Heidegger claims we are defined, not by what we are, but by the way we are what we are. But his concept of our ‘way’ of being is ambiguous and has given rise to four distinct readings of what he means. I draw upon recent work on kinds of genus-species relationships in order to disambiguate this concept and explain the unity and dependence-relations among the four extant readings of it. I argue that Heidegger’s main concern in the published portion of Being and Time is to explain what it takes for Dasein to be the entity that can understand its own way of being, not in this or that specific way, but rather, in general—that is, at all, as opposed to not at all.
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5. Heidegger Circle Proceedings: Volume > 48
Tyler Klaskow Heidegger’s Methodological Maxim
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In the Introduction to Being and Time Heidegger calls ‘To the things themselves’ the “maxim” of phenomenology. I argue that Heidegger recognized the maxim’s normativity but thought that Husserl’s understanding of it made it an inadequate guide for the phenomenological method. I show that Heidegger revised the maxim in his Marburg years with a focus on its role as a principle. The revised maxim specifies how to engage in phenomenological inquiry by calling the phenomenologist’s attention to the violence our fore-conceptions can do to the way phenomena show themselves. With this revised maxim in mind I reconsider the grounds of Heidegger’s critique of Husserl in the Marburg years, and explain his conclusion that Husserl’s phenomenology was unphenomenological. Finally, I show that Heidegger’s attempts to abide by his more rigorous maxim appear to fail.
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6. Heidegger Circle Proceedings: Volume > 48
Steven Crowell We Have Never Been Animals: Heidegger’s Posthumanism
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7. Heidegger Circle Proceedings: Volume > 48
Lawrence Hatab The Point of Language in Heidegger’s Thinking: A Call for the Revival of Formal Indication
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8. Heidegger Circle Proceedings: Volume > 48
Pol Vandevelde Ereignis as Singularity: Can Foucault Help us Understand Heidegger’s Notion of the ‘Event’
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The notion of event (Ereignis) that Heidegger introduces in the 1930s names a singularity as something that happens (geschehen), but cannot be repeated and cannot thus fall under a concept. The same holds for the notion of “other beginning,” which thus cannot be in continuity with the first beginning. I show that Heidegger uses two different descriptions of such an event: a messianic or diachronic one—something will happen, we are in transition toward it—and a synchronic one: the event permeates our ways of thinking now. I show that Michel Foucault’s understanding of “the event in thought” (l’événement dans la pensée) that he uses and applies in his Hermeneutics of the Subject can help us understand that the two aspects of the event—messianic and synchronic—are not contradictory, but belongs of necessity to a thinking of a singularity, as Heidegger practices it.
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9. Heidegger Circle Proceedings: Volume > 48
Silvia Benso On Thinkers, Poets, and Mysterious Guests in Heidegger’s Second Country Path Conversation (GA 77)
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The paper argues that the second of Martin Heidegger’s Country Path Conversations (GA 77), namely, “Der Lehrer trifft den Türmer an der Tür zum Turmaufgang,” provides the reader with a live performance of a dialogue (much advocated by Heidegger) between a poet and a thinker. Through a textual analysis of various dramatic elements in the conversation, I provide an imaginative albeit plausible identification of the three characters in the dialogue (namely, the teacher, the tower warden, and the guest) that makes sense in light of the overall conversational context and opens new possibilities for the philosophical meaning of the conversation itself.
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10. Heidegger Circle Proceedings: Volume > 48
Shane Ewegen The Thing and I: Thinking with Things in Heidegger’s Country Path Conversations
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11. Heidegger Circle Proceedings: Volume > 48
Casey Rentmeester Dwelling Freely Among Things: A Practical Heideggerian Ecology
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12. Heidegger Circle Proceedings: Volume > 48
Karen Robertson Realizing an Enigma: The Task of Community in Heidegger’s On the Way to Language
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I argue that the analyses of language Heidegger offers in On the Way to Language demonstrate that language is both constitutively other to us and manifest to us as our historically specific possibilities of meaningful life. To do so, I argue that Heidegger’s focus on our experience of speaking demonstrates that we experience the alterity of language as an imperative, as questionable, and as perpetually ahead of us, and that these characteristics correspond to our ways of taking up meaningfully the possibilities of contemporary life available to us only in our collectively constituted, historical contexts. Further, I draw on Heidegger account of the experience of the poet who figures in Stefan George’s poem “Words” to argue that our experience of language is characterized by learning to criticize aspects of contemporary life. I also identify this practice of critique as essential to community, defining the latter as a collective attempt to preserve and transform possibilities of meaningful life.
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13. Heidegger Circle Proceedings: Volume > 48
James Risser Heidegger’s Ethics of History (with reference to Agamben)
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Does Heidegger have an ethics of history? The very idea of an ethics of history, especially in regards to Heidegger’s work, appears to make little sense. For Heidegger, history is always the history of being, and, as we learn from the “Letter on Humanism,” the nature of ethics has yet to be fully determined. And yet, if we follow Heidegger is his way of determining the ethical in relation to *thos, we can in fact begin to speak of Heidegger’s ethics of history. Towards this end, I want to further interpret his characterization of *thos, especially as it is presented through the saying of Heraclitus, and extend the interpretation through the work of Giorgio Agamben.
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14. Heidegger Circle Proceedings: Volume > 48
Mark Wrathall ‘Demanding Authenticity of Ourselves’: Heidegger on Authenticity as an Extra-Moral Ideal
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15. Heidegger Circle Proceedings: Volume > 48
Rachel Aumiller Dasein’s Shadow and the Moment of its Disappearance in Being and Time
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In his 1937 lectures, Heidegger pursues Nietzsche’s initial thought of “the Moment.” This paper mimics Heidegger’s pursuit of Nietzsche’s Moment by tracing Heidegger’s own early arrival at the Moment in Being and Time. I argue that Dasein, like Zarathustra, is chased in and out of the Moment by its shadow. While Dasein forgets itself in inauthentically securing its identity in its shadow, which is closest-at-hand, it also confronts its own finitude in witnessing the daily dwindling of its shadow—the everyday passing away of time.
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16. Heidegger Circle Proceedings: Volume > 48
Joshua Rayman A Nietzsche that Heidegger could Appreciate: Nietzsche as Non-Naturalistic, Non-Metaphysical Thinker
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Heidegger’s lecture courses on Nietzsche give prominent attention to the question of what he calls “Nietzsche’s Alleged Biologism.” I will argue that Heidegger is not merely replacing the Nazi biologistic reading with a metaphysical reading, for his metaphysical reading of Nietzsche is biological, in a distinct sense. Although I reject this metaphysical reading, Heidegger aids my project of constructing a non-naturalist, yet physical reading of Nietzsche in at least four ways: 1) he rejects the Nazi biologistic reading of Nietzsche, 2) he sets forth distinct notions of the biological and the physical akin to Nietzsche, 3) he argues against scientific naturalism in favor of an alternative mode of knowing, and 4) he recognizes that rather than reducing everything to nature, Nietzsche anticipates him in intertwining more originary, dynamic notions of physis and techne.
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17. Heidegger Circle Proceedings: Volume > 48
Lee Braver Heidegger, Foucault, and Clocks: An Impure Genealogy of Time
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18. Heidegger Circle Proceedings: Volume > 48
Conference Schedule
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19. Heidegger Circle Proceedings: Volume > 46
Raoni Padui From the Facticity of Dasein to the Facticity of Nature: Naturalism, Animality, and the Ontological Difference
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20. Heidegger Circle Proceedings: Volume > 46
Hans Pedersen Heidegger’s Critique of a Causal Understanding of Human Action
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