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1. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 26 > Issue: 3
Daniel Dombrowski Developmental Theism: From Pure Will to Unbounded Love
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2. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 26 > Issue: 4
Angus Menuge Darwinism and its Discontents
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3. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 26 > Issue: 4
Ira M. Schnall ANTHROPIC OBSERVATION SELECTION EFFECTS AND THE DESIGN ARGUMENT
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The Argument from Fine-Tuning, a relatively new version of the Design Argument, has given rise to an objection, based on what is known as the An­thropic Principle. It is alleged that the argument is fallacious in that it involves an observation selection effect—that given the existence of intelligent living observers, the observation that the universe is fine-tuned for the existence of intelligent life is not surprising. Many find this objection puzzling, or at least easily refutable. My main contribution to the discussion is to offer an analysis of what is wrong (and what is right) in the objection.
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4. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 26 > Issue: 4
James K. A. Smith CONTINENTAL PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION: PRESCRIPTIONS FOR A HEALTHY SUBDISCIPLINE
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Over the past decade there has been a burgeoning of work in philosophy of religion that has drawn upon and been oriented by “continental” sources in philosophy—associated with figures such as Martin Heidegger, Jacques Derrida, Emmanuel Levinas, Jean-Luc Marion, Gilles Deleuze, and others. This is a significant development and one that should be welcomed by the community of Christian philosophers. However, in this dialogue piece I take stock of the field of “continental philosophy of religion” and suggest that the field is developing some un-healthy patterns and habits. The burden of the paper is to suggest a prescription for the future health of this important field by articulating six key practices that should characterize further scholarship in continental philosophy of religion.
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5. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 26 > Issue: 4
Timothy Pawl, Kevin Timpe Incompatibilism, Sin, and Free Will in Heaven
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The traditional view of heaven holds that the redeemed in heaven both have free will and are no longer capable of sinning. A number of philosophers have argued that the traditional view is problematic. How can someone be free and yet incapable of sinning? If the redeemed are kept from sinning, their wills must be reined in. And if their wills are reined in, it doesn’t seem right to say that they are free. Following James Sennett, we call this objection to the traditional view of heaven ‘the Problem of Heavenly Freedom’. In this paper, we discuss and criticize four attempts to respond to the Problem of Heavenly Freedom. We then offer our own response to this problem which both preserves the traditional view of heaven and avoids the objections which beset the other attempts.
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6. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 26 > Issue: 4
Charles Taliaferro Religion and Morality
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7. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 26 > Issue: 4
T. J. Mawson God and Phenomenal Consciousness: A Novel Approach to Knowledge Arguments
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8. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 26 > Issue: 4
Robert T. Miller Toward a Theory of Human Rights
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9. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 26 > Issue: 4
Alvin Plantinga IN MEMORIAM: WILLIAM P. ASTON
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10. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 26 > Issue: 4
Hugh J. McCann GOD, SIN, AND ROGERS ON ANSELM: A REPLY
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Based on views she draws from Anselm, Katherin Rogers mounts an extend­ed attack on my account of God’s relationship to human sin. Here I argue first that if Anselm’s view of the relationship in question is different from my own, then Rogers fails to locate any reason for thinking his account is correct. I argue further that Rogers fails to demonstrate her claim that my account of God’s relation to sin makes him a deceiver, that her criticisms of my theodicy of sin are misguided, and that she is mistaken in claiming a world in which God has full sovereignty over human willing is less safe for the repentant than I hold it to be.
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11. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 26 > Issue: 4
Brendan Sweetman Believing by Faith: An Essay in the Epistemology and Ethics of Religious Belief
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12. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 26 > Issue: 4
Bruce Ellis Benson A RESPONSE TO SMITH’S “CONTINENTAL PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION: PRESCRIPTIONS FOR A HEALTHY SUBDISCIPLINE”
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All of us working in continental philosophy of religion can be grateful to James K. A. Smith for his call to consider which practices will best further the “health” of the burgeoning subdiscipline of continental philosophy of religion. Given that he offers his suggestions “in the spirit of ‘conversation starters,’” my response is designed to continue what I hope will be an ongoing conversation. With that goal in mind, I respond to Smith by considering not only the practicality of each suggestion but also whether adopting practices he suggests would actually improve the health of the subdiscipline.
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13. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 26 > Issue: 4
Alexander R. Pruss ANOTHER STEP IN DIVINE COMMAND DIALECTICS
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Consider the following three-step dialectics. (1) Even if God (consistently) commanded torture of the innocent, it would still be wrong. Therefore Divine Command Metaethics (DCM) is false. (2) No: for it is impossible for God to command torture of the innocent. (3) Even if it is impossible, there is a non-trivially true per impossibile counterfactual that even if God (consistently) com­manded torture of the innocent, it would still be wrong, and this counterfac­tual is incompatible with DCM. I shall argue that the last step of this dialectics is flawed because it would rule out every substantive metaethical theory.
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14. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 26 > Issue: 4
James K. A. Smith THE END OF ENCLAVES: A REPLY TO BENSON
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In reply to Benson’s response, I agree that we should be seeking the dissolution of all enclaves in philosophy of religion—whether continental or analytic. But I continue to suggest that continental philosophy of religion bears special burdens in this respect.
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15. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 26 > Issue: 4
Daniel N. Robinson Body-Self Dualism in Contemporary Ethics and Politics
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16. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 26 > Issue: 4
Thomas Talbott GOD, FREEDOM, AND HUMAN AGENCY
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I argue that, contrary to the opinion of Wes Morriston, William Rowe, and others, a supremely perfect God, if one should exist, would be the freest of all beings and would represent the clearest example of what it means to act freely. I suggest further that, if we regard human freedom as a reflection of God’s ideal freedom, we can avoid some of the pitfalls in both the standard libertarian and the standard compatibilist accounts of freewill.
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17. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 26 > Issue: 5
David Bradshaw The Mind and the Heart in the Christian East and West
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One of the most intriguing features of Eastern Orthodoxy is its understanding of the mind and the heart. Orthodox authors such as St. Gregory Palamas speak of “drawing the mind into the heart” through prayer. What does this mean, and what does it indicate about the eastern Christian understanding of the human person? This essay attempts to answer such questions through a comparative study of the eastern and western views of the mind and the heart, beginning with their common origin in the Bible and continuing through their later divergence.
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18. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 26 > Issue: 5
James A. Marcum Human Origins and Human Nature: Mitochondrial Eve and Y-Chromosomal Adam
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Both religion and science provide powerful images of human origins and human nature. Often these images are seen as incompatible or irreconcilable, with the religious image generally marginalized vis-à-vis the scientific image. Recent genetic studies into human origins, especially in terms of common cellular features like the mitochondrion from females and the Y-chromosome from males, provide evidence for common ancestors called mitochondrial Eve and Y-chromosomal Adam. The aim of this paper is to expound upon the Judeo-Christian and western scientific images of humanity with respect to human origins and human nature, especially in terms of possible reconciliation of the two images.
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19. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 26 > Issue: 5
David Bradshaw Introduction
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20. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 26 > Issue: 5
Vadim V. Vasilyev “The Hard Problem of Consciousness” and Two Arguments for Interactionism
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The paper begins with a restatement of Chalmers’s “hard problem of consciousness.” It is suggested that an interactionist approach is one of the possible solutions of this problem. Some fresh arguments against the identity theory and epiphenomenalism as main rivals of interactionism are developed. One of these arguments has among its corollaries a denial of local supervenience, although not of the causal closure principle. As a result of these considerations a version of “local interactionism” (compatible with causal closure) is proposed. It is argued that local interactionism may offer a fruitful path for resolving the “hard problem.”
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