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1. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 1 > Issue: 1
Marilyn Nissim-Sabat Victim No More
2. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 1 > Issue: 1
Harry R. Targ Bringing Context Back In: Reconstituting a Left Politics
3. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 1 > Issue: 1
Nada Elia Affirming Life, Inscribing the Intifada: When the Subalterns Scream
4. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 1 > Issue: 1
Ralph Johnson A Complex Portrait of a Complex Radical: Roger Guenveur Smith’s A Huey P. Newton Story
5. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 1 > Issue: 1
William L. McBride Radicalism as the Lucid Awareness of Radical Evil: A Second Look at Manichæism
6. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 1 > Issue: 1
Angela Y. Davis, Joy Ann James, Richard Curtis Dialogue on Radicalism and the Left: Radicalism Today
7. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 1 > Issue: 1
Martin Beck Matuštik What Does Critical Theory Have to Do with It?: In Retrospect and Prospect
8. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 1 > Issue: 1
Paul Buhle Radicalism at the Present Moment: A Report on the U.S. Left
9. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 1 > Issue: 1
Lewis R. Gordon Introduction
10. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 1 > Issue: 1
Subcommandante Insurgente Marcos, Kerry Appel The Zapatista National Army
11. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 1 > Issue: 2
Lewis R. Gordon Introduction
12. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 1 > Issue: 2
Norman G. Finkelstein Oslo: The Last Stage of Conquest
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The author compares the strategies used in the conquest of the American West, the imperialism of the Third Reich, the creation of Bantustans in South Africa, and cautions against sanguine readings of the Oslo Peace Talks between Israel and Palestine. He concludes that the current agreements are in fact the last stages of Israeli conquest of Palestine.
13. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 1 > Issue: 2
Charles Verharen An Ethics of Intimacy: Race and Moral Obligation
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The author criticizes efforts to resuscitate W. E. B. Du Bois’s claim that people of African descent have a special obligation to each other premised on race. He concludes that Africana philosophers such as Du Bois, Alain Locke, and Lucius Outlaw do not claim to possess essential knowledge of the human condition but instead propose a story human beings can tell about what they’re doing with their lives. Their story exerts imperative force only when they can convince themselves that it is a better story than all the others they have inherited.
14. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 1 > Issue: 2
Donna Edmonds-Mitchell Race Relations
15. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 1 > Issue: 2
Brian Locke “Top Dog,” “Black Threat,” and “Japanese Cats”: The Impact of the White-Black Binary on Asian-American Identity
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This essay is a reading of two Hollywood films: The Defiant Ones (1958, directed by Stanley Kramer, starring Tony Curtis and Sidney Poitier) and Rising Sun (1993, directed by Philip Kauffman starring Wesley Snipes and Sean Connery, based on the Michael Crichton novel of the same name). The essay argues that these films work to contain black demand for social and political equality not through exclusionary measures, but rather through deliberate acknowledgment of blackness as integral to US identity. My reading shows how a homosocial bond between white and black stands in for US national identity, and how this identity is unified by foregrounding the threat of an apocalyptic outcome. I use the concept of brinkmanship to illustrate the political effects of this particular narrative form. Then I move to Rising Sun, a film that employs a racial triangle of white, black and Asian men to manage black demand for social change. I argue that the narrative logic and the cultural politics of the film require any figure that is both Asian and masculine to be coded as a foreign enemy.
16. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 1 > Issue: 2
Stephen Hartnett Sheriff Joseph M. Arpaio . . .
17. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 1 > Issue: 2
Nanette Funk, Andrew Wengraf Honoring Gertrude Ezorsky: The Society for Women in Philosophy’s 1997 Distinguished Woman Professor
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The paper included here was presented by Nanette Funk in Honor of Gertrude Ezorsky, the famed philosopher, feminist, and antiracism activist, at the 1997 Meeting of the Society for Women in Philosophy. It is published here as presented. Thus, although it is a coauthored talk the “I” refers to Nanette Funk.
18. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
Patricia Huntington Listening to Zapatismo: A Reflection on Spiritual DeRacination
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This reflection considers my dawning realization that Zapatista insurgency reflects not only opposition to racist devaluation of the cultures of indigenous peoplesbut more fundamentally a struggle to overcome spiritual deracination. I contest two basic assumptions of much contemporary social theory: that race and deracination are entirely socio-cultural phenomena and that the central role played by dialogical accord in Zapatista communities can be understood without a spiritual conception of human existence. I propose that only a spiritual understanding of these three pivotal issues—race, deracination, and dialogue (or accord)—aptly captures the core intuitions that inform Zapatista insurgency.
19. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
Eduardo Mendieta, Jeffrey Paris Editors’ Introduction
20. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
Kathryn Russell Feminist Dialectics and Marxist Theory
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Both feminists and Marxists have realized that it is necessary to avoid reductionism and recognize the intersections between gender, race, and class. But we donot have a methodology sufficient to develop this idea. I argue that Bertell Ollman’s book Dance of the Dialectic provides a way to think about intersectionality usingMarx’s methodology of abstraction and his theory of internal relations. As a relational abstraction, gender is intersectional. We may legitimately focus on it, as longas we treat it dialectically. We can recognize that it is not homogeneous but stands in relations of identity and/or contradiction with other social relations.