Displaying: 1-10 of 150 documents

0.029 sec

1. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 17 > Issue: 5/6
Résolution Finale de l’Assamblée Constutive de La SOCIÉTÉ EUROPÉENNE DE CULTURE
2. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 17 > Issue: 5/6
Adresse aux intellectuels votée à l’unanimité par la première Assemblée Générale Ordinaire, réunie à Venise du 8 au 11 novembre 1951
3. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 17 > Issue: 5/6
Lettre aux autorités politiques votée à l’unanimité par la première Assemblée Générale Ordinaire
4. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 17 > Issue: 5/6
Résolution Finale votée à l’unanimité par le deuxième Assemblée Générale Ordinaire
5. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 17 > Issue: 5/6
M. Campagnolo-Bouvier, Arrigo Levi, Vincenzo Cappelletti Les crises de notre présent et la référence éthique. Appel au dialogue
6. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 17 > Issue: 5/6
Texte voté à l’unanimité par la quatrième Assemblée Générale Ordinaire
7. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 17 > Issue: 5/6
Résolution Finale votée à l’unanimité par la troisième Assemblée Générale Ordinaire
8. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 17 > Issue: 5/6
Résolution Finale votée à l’unanimité par la sixième Assemblée Générale Ordinaire
9. History of Communism in Europe: Volume > 1
Jean-Claude Polet Histoire, Mémoire et Eschatologie
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
History, as part of the “humanities department”, establishes facts, by way of investigating the sources. However, historians also pass a judgement over the moral attributes of past events. Given that the act of memorialisation is always incomplete, could one envisage an ideal horizon where justice and forgiveness are simultaneously restored? This eschatological perspective would require the reunion of past, present, and future tense. Without future, there is no hope. Without past, there is the risk of amnesia and the danger of minimizing the facts, actions, and responsibilities of the perpetrators against their victims. The present, in its turn, must be made fertile through the practice of recognition and repentance. It is only repentance that breaks through the iron cage of hatred and revenge (“eye for eye, tooth for tooth”). Peace is the event whereby reconciliation is enacted freely, by an appropriation of the past without external compulsion. Seen from an eschatological perspective, history and memory come to serve the common good.
10. History of Communism in Europe: Volume > 1
Mia Jinga Orlando Figes: Les chuchoteurs: Vivre et survivre sous Staline