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81. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 21 > Issue: 3
Stacy Trasancos

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82. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 21 > Issue: 3
Vince A. Punzo

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83. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 21 > Issue: 3
Christopher Kaczor

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84. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 21 > Issue: 2
Edward J. Furton

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85. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 21 > Issue: 2
Greg Schleppenbach

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essays

86. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 21 > Issue: 2
Tyler McNabb, Michael DeVito

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In this essay, we respond to Dustin Crummett’s argument that one cannot consistently appeal to body count reasoning to justify being a single-issue pro-life voter if one is also committed to the usual response to the embryo rescue case. Specifically, we argue that a modified version of BCR we call BCR* is consistent with the usual response. We then move to address concerns about the relevance of BCR* to Crummett’s original thesis.
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87. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 21 > Issue: 2
Helen Watt

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Cooperation in wrongdoing is an everyday matter for all of us, though we need to discern when such cooperation is morally excluded as constituting formal cooperation, as opposed to material (unintended) cooperation whether justified or otherwise. In this paper, I offer examples of formal cooperation such as referral of patients for certain procedures where the cooperating doctor intends an intrinsically wrongful plan of action on the part of the patient and a medical colleague. I also consider a case of formal cooperation where the cooperator intends a choice on the part of another person that is not intrinsically wrong, but wrong in the circumstances because the person believes it will cause serious uncompensated harm.
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88. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 21 > Issue: 2
Paul Scherz

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Recent magisterial teaching suggests that Catholics should prefer COVID-19 vaccines in which immortalized cells derived from the remains of aborted fetuses did not play a role in production, even though all of them can be licitly used. Many scholars contest any distinction between the different vaccines, in part by arguing that these cell lines have become artifacts. This argument is inadequate on a number of levels. First, these scholars have not sufficiently proven the point that the cell lines become artifacts through biotechnological manipulation. Second, considering cell lines as mere artifacts commodifies them in a way that is rejected even by secular authors. Third, this mode of commodification reinforces the technocratic paradigm. Finally, embracing this commodification of cell lines will prevent moral theology from properly judging other aspects of the growing bioeconomy. These arguments suggest that distinguishing between different vaccines remains the most appropriate course.
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89. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 21 > Issue: 2
Rev. Kevin Flannery, SJ

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The essay begins with an explanation of St. Alphonsus Liguori’s understanding of the distinction between formal and material cooperation, identifying also some problems inherent in that understanding. The essay goes on to expound related ideas in the writings of St. Thomas Aquinas, ideas that are applicable to cases not easily analyzable by means of the distinction between formal and material cooperation. The essay then applies these ideas to two contemporary issues: the use of vaccines connected in some way with abortions and the objection by the Little Sisters of the Poor to the contraceptive mandate issued by the US Department of Health and Human Services.
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articles

90. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 21 > Issue: 2
Cara Buskmiller

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Pregnancy causes maternal pathology by combining maternal predispositions with healthy physiology. In maternal cardiovascular collapse, previable induction of labor is justifiable despite the definition of abortion in directive 45 of the Ethical and Religious Directives for Catholic Health Care Services. Central to this conclusion, the placenta is a fetal organ, and pregnancy is a cardiovascular condition placing new demands on the maternal cardiovascular system. Previable delivery, a morally neutral separation, addresses the cause of pathology even if fetal death is anticipated. This is acceptable under double-effect reasoning. Directive 45 defines all previable deliveries as abortions, so this analysis proposes an alternative definition established by obstetrician/gynecologists.
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91. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 21 > Issue: 2
Paul Riffon

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Often-cited papal pronouncements regarding organ donation emphasize the importance of gift giving and the consent of the donor. However, a critical reading reveals an ill-defined separation of living organ donation and donation after death. Given that a corpse cannot engage in gift giving, nor can it give consent, the family, acting as good stewards, is the proper decision maker for organ donation after death. A historical examination of relics and human anatomical dissection reveals that the Catholic Church has primarily favored the decisional authority of the family over the first-person consent of the dead. Given this history, family-based consent (as opposed to opt-in or opt-out criteria) is the best model to ensure the dignity of the dead.
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92. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 21 > Issue: 2
Rev. Anthony Paul Hollowell

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When threatened with rape, is it permissible for a virgin to commit suicide so that she might preserve her virginity? Both St. John Chrysostom and St. Ambrose allowed for suicide in these situations because they considered it a martyrdom, but St. Augustine argued that such an act is always illicit unless commanded by God, a teaching later adopted by St. Thomas Aquinas. In this paper, these arguments will be presented and then applied to cases of vital conflict, which involve many of the same principles disputed by these Doctors of the Church. This article contributes to the discussion of vital conflicts by reinforcing its patristic and Thomistic foundation.
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verbatim

93. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 21 > Issue: 2
Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith

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notes & abstracts

94. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 21 > Issue: 2
Kevin Wilger

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95. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 21 > Issue: 2
John S. Sullivan, MD

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96. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 21 > Issue: 2
Christopher Kaczor

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book reviews

97. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 21 > Issue: 2
Julie Grimstad

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98. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 21 > Issue: 2
Perry J. Cahall

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99. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 21 > Issue: 2
Colten P. Maertens-Pizzo

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100. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 21 > Issue: 2
Brian Welter

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