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Displaying: 81-100 of 3426 documents


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81. International Studies in Philosophy: Volume > 38 > Issue: 4
Jon Mahoney The Modern Social Imaginary
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82. International Studies in Philosophy: Volume > 38 > Issue: 4
Steven D. Decaroli The Oxford Handbook of Aesthetics
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83. International Studies in Philosophy: Volume > 38 > Issue: 4
Jason M. Wirth The Vegetative Soul: From Philosophy of Nature to Subjectivity in the Feminine
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84. International Studies in Philosophy: Volume > 38 > Issue: 4
Patrick Kane The Jew, the Arab: A History of the Enemy
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85. International Studies in Philosophy: Volume > 38 > Issue: 4
Lisa Raphals Cosmology and Political Culture in Early China
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86. International Studies in Philosophy: Volume > 38 > Issue: 4
Manuel Chávez-Jiménez Marx and Wittgenstein: Knowledge, Morality, and Politics
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87. International Studies in Philosophy: Volume > 38 > Issue: 4
Julio César Díaz Exiling the Poets
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88. International Studies in Philosophy: Volume > 38 > Issue: 4
Yevgenia Skorobogatov-Gray The Gift of Property: Having the Good
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89. International Studies in Philosophy: Volume > 38 > Issue: 4
Contributors
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90. International Studies in Philosophy: Volume > 38 > Issue: 3
Rex Welshon Introduction
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91. International Studies in Philosophy: Volume > 38 > Issue: 3
James J. Winchester Theories and Stories: Of Starry Nights, Ditches, Bloated Innards, and the Laughter of Servant Girls
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92. International Studies in Philosophy: Volume > 38 > Issue: 3
Steven Crowell Fink’s Untimely Nietzsche: Between Heidegger and Derrida
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93. International Studies in Philosophy: Volume > 38 > Issue: 3
Jessica N. Berry Skepticism in Nietzsche’s Earliest Work: Another Look at Nietzsche’s “On Truth and Lies in an Extra-Moral Sense”
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94. International Studies in Philosophy: Volume > 38 > Issue: 3
Matthew H. Meyer The Three Metamorphoses of Nietzsche’s Free Spirit
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95. International Studies in Philosophy: Volume > 38 > Issue: 3
Clancy Martin Nietzsche After Therapy
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96. International Studies in Philosophy: Volume > 38 > Issue: 3
Michael W. Grenke Countless Dark Bodies: Kant and the Astronomical Metaphors in Beyond Good and Evil
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97. International Studies in Philosophy: Volume > 38 > Issue: 3
R. Lanier Anderson Nietzsche on Strength and Achieving Individuality
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98. International Studies in Philosophy: Volume > 38 > Issue: 3
Kathleen Marie Higgins Nietzsche, Empty Names, and Individuality
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99. International Studies in Philosophy: Volume > 38 > Issue: 3
Richard Schacht Nietzsche and Individuality
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We want to become those we are—the new, the unique, the incomparable, the self-legislators, the self-creators. [Wir aber wollendie werden, die wir sind—die Neuen, die Einmaligen, die Unvergleickbaren, die Sich-selber-Gesetzgebenden, die Sich-selber-Schaffenden!] (GS 336, 1882)Verily, the individual himself [der Einselne selber] is still the most recent invention. (Z I:15, 1883)My philosophy aims at an ordering of rank: not at an individualistic morality. (WP 287, from the notebooks of 1886–87)If we place ourselves at the end of this tremendous process . . . ,where society and the morality of custom at last reveal what theyhave simply been the means to: then we discover that the ripest fruit is the sovereign individual [souveräne Individuum], like only tohimself, liberated again from the morality of custom, autonomous and supramoral . . . , in short, the man who has his own independent,protracted will and the right to make promises. (GM II:2, 1887)Every particular individual [ Jeder einzelne] may be regarded as representing the ascending or descending line of life. When onehas decided which, one has thereby established a canon for the value of his egoism. If he represents the ascending line his valueis in fact extraordinary. . . . If he represents the descending development . . . , then he can be accorded little value. (TI “Skirmishes”33, 1888)The particular person, the ‘individual’ [Der einzelne, das ‘Individuum’], as people and philosophers have hitherto understood him,is an error: he does not constitute a separate entity, an atom, a ‘link in the chain,’ something merely inherited from the past—heconstitutes the entire single line ‘Mensch’ up to and including himself. (TI “Skirmishes” 33, 1888)Goethe conceived of a strong, highly cultured human being, skilled in all physical accomplishments, who, keeping himself incheck and having reverence for himself, dares to allow himself the whole compass and wealth of naturalness, who is strongenough for this freedom. . . . A spirit thus emancipated stands in the midst of the universe with a joyful and trusting fatalism, inthe faith that only the particular individual [das Einzelne] may be rejected, that in the totality everything is redeemed and affirmed.. . . But such a faith is the highest of all possible faiths: I have baptized it with the name Dionysus. (TI “Skirmishes” 49)
100. International Studies in Philosophy: Volume > 38 > Issue: 3
Tamsin Shaw Nietzsche on Secularization and Moral Decadence
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