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Displaying: 81-90 of 554 documents


review essay
81. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
Gail M. Presbey, Portrait of a Contemporary American Revolutionary: Grace Lee Boggs
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book reviews
82. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
Mark Balawender, Workers and Intellectuals: The Case of Solidarity
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83. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
Anna Carastathis, Fortunes of Fraser
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84. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
Margaret A. McLaren, And Justice for All?
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85. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
Sarah Tyson, Fomenting the Revolution Underway
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86. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
Contributors
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87. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 17 > Issue: 1
Harry van der Linden, A Note from the Editor
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88. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 17 > Issue: 1
Tommy J. Curry, Richard A. Jones, The Black Radical Tradition as an Inspiration for Organizing the Themes of Radical Philosophy: Guest Editors' Introduction
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radical ethics
89. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 17 > Issue: 1
Tim R. Johnston, Being Radically Polite: Caring for Our Fractured Discourse
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There is little doubt that our political discourse has become more polarized over the last thirty years. I argue that as radical thinkers we can turn to politeness as one way to begin working past this partisan and adversarial atmosphere. I define politeness as a self-conscious appreciation of the role of social convention in repairing and maintaining our relationships. The first section compares politeness and decency to highlight what is unique about politeness. The second section argues that politeness can be considered a form of care. The third and final section describes how radical theory can use politeness to start initiating healthier dialogue.
90. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 17 > Issue: 1
Katherine K. Biederman, Radical Ethics
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Are traditional models of ethics sufficiently action-guiding? It is customary for moral philosophers to formulate substantive normative theories that advance principles of right conduct. The purpose of these principles is to act as a guide to judgment and action. I propose that normative models of ethics fail to be sufficiently action-guiding. In so doing, I advocate a reform of traditional ethics and propose a radical reformulation of ethics—an ethic that makes education a moral imperative.