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Displaying: 81-90 of 520 documents


articles
81. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 16 > Issue: 3
Bonnie Mann, Three White Men Walk into a Bar: Philosophy's Pluralism
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This short discussion piece invites readers to consider two questions: What does “pluralism” mean in philosophy? and What should it mean? Brian Leiter’s assault on Linda Martin Alcoff and The Pluralist’s Guide to Philosophy is taken as an opportunity to reflect on several conceptions of philosophical pluralism: the “philosophical gourmet’s” conception, the “three white men” conception, and Scott Pratt’s epistemological pluralism. In each, there is a failure to come to terms with both history and power. What is at stake in philosophy’s pluralism debates is the aspiration to judgment, in the Arendtian sense, among philosophy’s others—this aspiration is both unsettling to the discipline and important for its future.
82. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 16 > Issue: 3
E. Das Janssen, Queering Heidegger: An Applied Ontology
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This paper explores practical application of Heidegger’s fundamental ontology to lived human experience and practical concerns beyond those he addressed, specifically the phenomenon of gender. We are so committed to gender norms that we ostracize or even kill those who violate them, yet rarely question the reasonableness of our expectations. Gender needs to be examined from a phenomenological stance, a) because of the ubiquity of gendering, b) because presuppositions regarding gender go largely unquestioned in most Daseins’ everyday existence, and c) because cases in which actual fact contravenes our expectations offer insight into what it means to be human.
83. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 16 > Issue: 3
Carlos Alberto Sánchez, On Heidegger's "Thin" Eurocentrism and the Possibility of a "Mexican" Philosophy
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This paper considers the nature of Heidegger’s Eurocentrism in regard to philosophy. Focusing primarily on “A Dialogue on Language,” I argue, first, that Heidegger recognizes the limits of the Eurocentric idea of philosophy and proposes its overcoming. Secondly, I suggest that the proposal to overcome philosophy is made in an attempt to protect philosophy from the encroachment of an otherness that challenges its very identity. This leads me to the view, thirdly, that Heidegger’s Eurocentrism about philosophy is compromising insofar as he is willing, to a certain degree, to let go of philosophy’s European origin. This “thinning” out of Heidegger’s Eurocentrism, finally, opens the door to a consideration of the possibility for a non-Western, namely, a Latin American, or Mexican “philosophy.”
review essays
84. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 16 > Issue: 3
Anatole Anton, Marx to Benjamin
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85. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 16 > Issue: 3
Thomas Klikauer, Hegel on Profits, Poverty, and Politics
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book reviews
86. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 16 > Issue: 3
Andrew Dunstall, Is Close Enough Good Enough?: On the "Close Reading" of Derrida's "Grammatology"
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87. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 16 > Issue: 3
V. Denise James, Whites, Tarry Here!: George Yancy on Whiteness
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88. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 16 > Issue: 3
Cynthia Kaufman, Rethinking Socialism
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89. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 16 > Issue: 3
Eric Lambert, The Limits of Recognition
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90. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 16 > Issue: 3
Linda Martín Alcoff, Epistemology and Politics
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