Already a subscriber? - Login here
Not yet a subscriber? - Subscribe here

Displaying: 71-80 of 376 documents


articles
71. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Nathan Kowalsky Towards an Ethic of Animal Difference
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Extending ethical considerability to animals consistently takes the form of imperialism: progressing outward from the core of human morality, it incorporates only those animals deemed relevantly similar to humans while rejecting or reforming those lifeforms which are not. I develop an ethic of animal treatment premised on the species difference of undomesticated animals, which has the potential to reunite not only animal and environmental ethics, but environmental and interhuman ethics: each species has evolutionarily specified patterns of behavior for the proper treatment of members of its own species and members of other species.
72. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Brendan Mahoney The Virtue of Burden and Limits of Gelassenheit: The Complex Case for Heideggerian Environmental Ethics
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Since the 1980s, numerous scholars have applied the thought of Heidegger to environmental ethics—in particular, his critique of modern technology and his concept of ‘releasement.’ In this paper, I argue that these are an insufficient foundation for environmental ethics because they overlook a violence and destructiveness that is inextricable from our finite existence. Despite this critique, I claim that Heidegger’s analyses of violence in the 1930s and guilt in Being and Time can address some of these insufficiencies. To further develop the ethical potential of his philosophy, I bring it into dialogue with environmental virtue ethics.
book reviews
73. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Murray Code Arran Gare. The Philosophical Foundations of Ecological Civilization: A Manifesto for the Future
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
74. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Derrick Harris Timothy Morton. Dark Ecology: For a Logic of Future Coexistence
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
75. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Abigail Levin Alice Crary. Inside Ethics
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
76. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Parker Schill Byron Williston. The Anthropocene Project: Virtue in the Age of Climate Change
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
77. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Allen Thompson Steven Vogel. Thinking Like a Mall: Environmental Philosophy After the End of Nature
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
78. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Morten Tønnessen Arne Johan Vetlesen. The Denial of Nature: Environmental Philosophy in the Era of Global Capitalism
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
79. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Call for Papers: Special Issue of Environmental Philosophy in memory of W. S. K. “Scott” Cameron
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
articles
80. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 13 > Issue: 1
Donald S. Maier Taking Nature Seriously in the Anthropocene
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Nature conservation in the Anthropocene predominantly supposes that human-caused changes have worsened nature’s condition, which warrants undertaking conservation projects that actively manage or manipulate nature to improve it in quality or quantity. This essay surveys, by category, reasons and arguments for pursuing these projects. It finds key reasons to be normatively unimportant and key arguments incomplete or invalid. Conservation on this basis does not take nature seriously because it acts “for no good reason.” Finally, by attending to underlying sources of this general failure, the essay suggests how a different view of the value of nature and its conservation may achieve a sounder footing.