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Displaying: 71-80 of 520 documents


book reviews
71. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 17 > Issue: 1
Mladjo Ivanovic, The Limits of Our Humanitarian Present
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72. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 17 > Issue: 1
Elizabeth Oljar, Do We Still Need a Concept of Civil Disobedience?
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73. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 17 > Issue: 1
Corinne Painter, The Connection between Animal Rights and Animal Liberation: A Reconsideration of the Relation between Non-human Animal Autonomy and Animal Rights
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74. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 17 > Issue: 1
Raphael Sassower, The Role of the Left in American History
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75. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 17 > Issue: 1
Mark Lewis Taylor, The Cry of Victims and Philosophy: Liberation Beyond Habermas and Levinas
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76. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 17 > Issue: 1
Naomi Zack, Proposal for a Feminist Kantian Liberal Obligation to Resist Oppression
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77. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 17 > Issue: 1
Contributors
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78. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 16 > Issue: 3
Brandon Absher, Harry van der Linden, Editors' Introduction
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articles
79. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 16 > Issue: 3
Richard Schmitt, When the Day Comes, Will We Be Able to Construct a Socialist Democracy?
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Many socialists agree that socialism must be democratic, in the political as well as in the economic arena. But socialist democracy is very different from democracy in a capitalist country. Socialist democracy, it is widely believed, will be participatory: everyone will be a full participant in all decisions affecting his or her life. In this paper I argue that this conception of socialist democracy needs a lot more work. Not all decisions can be made by everybody affected by a decision. Many decisions that affect large numbers of persons must be made by representatives. But representation is subject to several serious weaknesses which are not products of capitalism. They will be obstacles to democracy also under socialism. Today we do not know what a socialist democracy would look like.
80. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 16 > Issue: 3
D. W. Haslett, Incentives, Opportunities, and Employee Ownership
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This essay challenges the belief in the superiority of capitalism as practiced today, and outlines an alternative economic system aimed at avoiding current capitalism’s main weaknesses. This alternative, built around employee ownership, is designed to result, over time, in a more equal distribution of income and wealth, while surpassing current capitalism’s main strength, its extraordinary economic productivity. It is an economic system that spreads economically beneficial incentives around more widely than today, and helps equalize opportunities. At its core is a buy-in and payoff scheme that avoids what are often said to be the major problems with employee ownership.