Already a subscriber? Login here
Not yet a subscriber? - Subscribe here

Displaying: 71-80 of 572 documents


71. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1
Harry van der Linden, A Note from the Editor
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
confronting state and theory
72. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1
Tommy J. Curry, Leonard Harris, Philosophy Born of Struggle: Thinking through Black Philosophical Organizations as Viable Schools of Thought
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
73. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1
Charles W. Mills, Racial Rights and Wrongs: A Critique of Derrick Darby
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Derrick Darby’s book Rights, Race, and Recognition defends the seemingly startling thesis that all rights, moral as well as legal, are dependent upon social recognition. So there are no “natural” rights independent of social practices, and subordinated groups in oppressive societies (such as blacks under white supremacy) do not have rights. Darby appeals to intersubjectivist constructivism to make his meta-ethical case, but in this critique, I argue that he conflates, or at least fails to consistently distinguish, two radically different varieties of constructivism: idealized intersubjectivist constructivism, which is objectivist, and non-idealized conventionalist constructivism, which is relativist. In neither case, then, can Darby establish the shocking thesis that white supremacy objectively takes away blacks’ moral standing.
74. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1
Albert Mosley, Autobiographical Musings on Race, Caste, and Violence
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Using the work of Richard Wright and personal interviews to portray racial interactions in the Jim Crow South, I illustrate how law enforcement used racial and sexual assaults to maintain black subordination. Jim Crow racism constituted a caste system in which one’s race was determined, not primarily by how one looked, but by one’s ancestry. I review and reject Oliver Cox’s thesis that caste did not exist in the Jim Crow South, and cite continuing examples of physical and sexual assaults against individuals based on racial, gender, and caste differences.
75. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1
Tommy J. Curry, Max Kelleher, Robert F. Williams and Militant Civil Rights: The Philosophy and Legacy of Pre-emptive Self-Defense
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Robert F. Williams, despite being a central historical figure and noted theorist of the Black radical tradition, is ignored as a subject of philosophical relevance and political theory. His challenges to the racist segregationist regime of the South influenced generations of thinkers and revolutionaries. However he is erased from the annals of thought for his use of armed resistance. This paper aims to introduce his life and work to philosophy as material for study and situate his program of pre-emptive self-defense within the Black radical tradition.
76. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1
Rozena Maart, Decolonizing Gender, Decolonizing Philosophy: An Existential Philosophical Account of Narratives from the Colonized
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
This essay situates the narrative of two Black women—one from the Black Consciousness Movement of Azania, one from the Black Panther Party—as central to the process of decolonizing philosophy and decolonizing gender. It offers a Black Consciousness critique of gender and philosophy, which both form the prelude to the narratives. Psychoanalysis, as the hermeneutics of the subject, is central to the process of interpretation and thus the interrogation of racism and colonialism. This essay shifts the paradigm of thinking by situating narrative and narration as central to the process of Black existentialism—spoken word, dialogue, exchanges, cross continental activism and scholarship—all within the same breath: the breath of the page where a simultaneous reading permits the deconstruction of the spoken word of the subject, and the deconstruction of writing.
77. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1
Rachel N. Hastings, Western Genders, African Bodies: The Theatrics of (e)Racing Black Women
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
The stage is often a space where artists engage in experiments with identity politics. Plays like Welcome to Thebes appear to present global human engagement and a cultural exchange of ideas. However, using European narrative structures as a playground to explore Africana political issues highlights the limitations to cross-cultural exchange between aesthetic paradigms. This essay first articulates a conflict between European and Africana aesthetics and then offers an analysis of gender dynamics operating in the play Welcome to Thebes, arguing that performative conditions not only constrain racialized realities, but also limit the possibility of cross-cultural performances of history.
78. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1
Greg Moses, Cultivating Cultures of Struggle: Why Revolutionaries Should Talk about Their Feelings
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Drawing on contexts of critical theory offered by Simone de Beauvoir, Herbert Marcuse, and Angela Davis, this article argues that Alain Locke’s theory of valuation should be of interest to theorists who apprehend struggle as a process of desire. Locke’s value theory with its classification of “form-feelings” may be used to develop appreciation for value’s genealogical dependence on desire. This has consequences for theorizing the challenges faced by liberation from oppressive structures. A case study is provided from popular film.
79. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1
James B. Haile, III, The Cultural-logic Turn of Black Philosophy
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Much of Africana philosophy concerns itself with the social and political; that is, those issues that relate to “racism” or “racialization” as suffered by Africana persons. Within this understanding, Africana persons become defined by and studied through theories which presume a shared anthropology with their white counterparts. This essay argues that Africana philosophy would benefit in thinking beyond “race” and “racialization” towards a theorization of the cultural aspects of Africana persons as the basis of our study and understanding of Africana persons. Specifically, this essay theorizes the relationship between mytho-logos and the culturalogic as offering a new lens through which to analyze the range problems confronting Africana philosophy.
review essays
80. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1
Patrick Anderson, Idealism, Multiculturalism, and the Critical Race Theory Legacy
view |  rights & permissions | cited by