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Displaying: 71-80 of 612 documents


book reviews
71. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 19 > Issue: 2
W. Ezekiel Goggin Robyn Marasco on Dialectical Despair and the Sources of Critical Theory
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72. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 19 > Issue: 2
Anna Malavisi Cuban Philosophers and a Battle for Ideas
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73. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 19 > Issue: 2
Mechthild Nagel Philosophy beyond the Carceral
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74. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 19 > Issue: 2
Anindya Sekhar Purakayastha Death Penalty: The Psychic Reimbursement in the Festival of Cruelty
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75. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 19 > Issue: 2
Michael Reno Rethinking the Normative Basis of Environmental Thought
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76. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 19 > Issue: 2
Shari Stone-Mediatore Masculinity and the War on Terror
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77. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 19 > Issue: 2
Contributors
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78. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 19 > Issue: 1
Andrew T. Lamas Accumulation of Crises, Abundance of Refusals
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This is the introductory essay for the first of two special issues of Radical Philosophy Review marking the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary of the publication of one of the twentieth century’s most provocative, subversive, and widely read works of radical theory—Herbert Marcuse’s One-Dimensional Man (1964), which we now reassess in an effort to contribute to the critical theory of our time. What are the possibilities and limits of our current situation? What are the prospects for moving beyond one-dimensionality? A summary of each of the articles featured in this special issue is also provided.
critical relevance
79. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 19 > Issue: 1
Douglas Kellner Reflections on Herbert Marcuse on the Fiftieth Anniversary of the Publication of One-Dimensional Man
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I discuss how I came to read, interpret, understand, critique, and use One-Dimensional Man, and I consider the book’s reception and relevance in the 1960s when it appeared, suggesting how its ideas relate to experiences and developments within US society and global capitalism from the 1940s and 1950s. Then, I examine how the model of one-dimensional society was put in question by the struggles and upheavals of the 1960s, how Herbert Marcuse revised his model in the 1970s, and how it fares in making sense of developments in the succeeding decades, up to the present. Thus, my interpretation will be philosophical, historical, and political, as the philosopher Herbert Marcuse would want it to be.
80. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 19 > Issue: 1
Charles Reitz Celebrating Herbert Marcuse's One-Dimensional Man: Deprovincialization and the Recovery of Philosophy
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In this historical contextualization of Herbert Marcuse’s One-Dimensional Man, I present critical arguments that Marcuse deploys in the US context—especially in light of the Civil Rights movement and the Vietnam War. I argue that (1) Marcuse’s critical perspective worked to deprovincialize Anglo-American philosophy and to demythologize the extravagantly glorified and sanitized “American Pageant” view of the world that prevailed in the United States at the time and (2) Marcuse’s critical pedagogy thus led to a revitalization and recovery of philosophy in the United States after World War II.