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71. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research: Volume > 86 > Issue: 2
Storrs McCall, Does the Brain Lead the Mind?
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72. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research: Volume > 86 > Issue: 2
Joseph Shieber, Toward a Truly Social Epistemology: Babbage, the Division of Mental Labor, and the Possibility of Socially Distributed Warrant
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In what follows, I appeal to Charles Babbage's discussion of the division of mental labor to provide evidence that—at least with respect to the social acquisition, storage, retrieval, and transmission of knowledge—epistemologists have, for a broad range of phenomena of crucial importance to actual knowers in their epistemic practices in everyday life, failed adequately to appreciate the significance of socially distributed cognition. If the discussion here is successful, I will have demonstrated that a particular presumption widely held within the contemporary discussion of the epistemology of testimony—a presumption that I will term thepersonalist requirement—fails to account for those very practices of knowers that I detail here. I will then conclude by suggesting that an alternate account of testimonial warrant, one that has heretofore been underappreciated, ought to be given more serious consideration—in particular because it is well suited to account for those actual practices of knowers that the personahst requirement leaves unrecognized.
73. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research: Volume > 86 > Issue: 2
Thor Grünbaum, Seeing what I am Doing
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74. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research: Volume > 86 > Issue: 2
Stephen Puryear, Leibniz on the Metaphysics of Color
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Drawing on remarks scattered through his writings, I argue that Leibniz has a highly distinctive and interesting theory of color. The central feature of the theory is the way in which it combines a nuanced subjectivism about color with a reductive approach of a sort usually associated with objectivist theories of color. After reconstructing Leibniz's theory and calling attention to some of its most notable attractions, I turn to the apparent incompatibility of its subjective and reductive components. I argue that this apparent tension vanishes in light of his rejection of a widely accepted doctrine concerning the nature of bodies and their geometrical qualities.
75. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research: Volume > 86 > Issue: 2
Matthew Noah Smith, Political Obligation and the Self
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76. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research: Volume > 86 > Issue: 2
Christoph Hoerl, Husserl, the Absolute Flow, and Temporal Experience
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special symposium
77. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research: Volume > 86 > Issue: 2
Brendan Balcerak Jackson, Metaphysics, Verbal Disputes and the Limits of Charity
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78. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research: Volume > 86 > Issue: 2
Eli Hirsch, Charity to Charity
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book symposium
79. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research: Volume > 86 > Issue: 2
Dana Kay Nelkin, Precis of Making Sense of Freedom and Responsibility
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80. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research: Volume > 86 > Issue: 2
Randolph Clarke, Abilities
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