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Displaying: 71-80 of 1605 documents


book reviews
71. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 32 > Issue: 4
Jacob L. Goodson, Paul Moser: The Severity of God: Religion and Philosophy Reconceived
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72. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 32 > Issue: 4
BrYan Pilkington, Charles C. Camosy: Peter Singer and Christian Ethics: Beyond Polarization
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73. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 32 > Issue: 4
Kirk Lougheed, Klaas J. Kraay, ed.: God and the Multiverse: Scientific, Philosophical, and Theological Perspectives
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74. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 32 > Issue: 4
J. Sage Elwell, Robert MacSwain and Taylor Worley, eds.:Theology, Aesthetics, and Culture: Responses to the Work of David Brown
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75. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 32 > Issue: 4
Lesley-Anne Dyer Williams, David Leech: The Hammer of the Cartesians: Henry Moore’s Philosophy of Spirit and the Origins of Modern Atheism
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articles
76. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 32 > Issue: 3
Gabriel Citron, Dreams, Nightmares, and a Defense against Arguments From Evil
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This paper appeals to the phenomenon of dreaming to provide a novel defense against arguments from evil. The thrust of the argument is as follows: when we wake up after a nightmare, we are often filled entirely with relief, and do not consider ourselves to have actually suffered very much at all; and since it is epistemically possible that this whole life is simply a dream, it follows that it is epistemically possible that in reality there is very little suffering. This epistemic possibility decisively undermines a key premise of both logical and evidential arguments from evil.
77. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 32 > Issue: 3
Rik Peels, Does God Have a Sense of Humor?
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This paper provides a defense of the thesis that God has a sense of humor. First, I sketch the four main theories of what it is to have a sense of humor that we find in the literature. Next, I argue that three arguments against the thesis that God has a sense of humor fail to convince. Then, I consider what one might take to be four biblical reasons to think that God has a sense of humor and argue that none of them are convincing. Subsequently, I give three philosophical reasons to think that God (if he exists) has a sense of humor, that is, reasons that any person who grasps the concept of God should be willing to embrace. These arguments differ in strength, but I argue that, jointly, they provide us with sufficient reason to think that God has a sense of humor. Finally, I spell out three implications of the idea that God has a sense of humor.
78. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 32 > Issue: 3
Ryan West, Adam C. Pelser, Perceiving God through Natural Beauty
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In Perceiving God, William Alston briefly suggests the possibility of perceiving God indirectly through the perception of another object. Following recent work by C. Stephen Evans, we argue that Thomas Reid’s notion of “natural signs” helpfully illuminates how people can perceive God indirectly through natural beauty. First, we explain how some natural signs enable what Alston labels “indirect perception.” Second, we explore how certain emotions make it possible to see both beauty and the excellence of the minds behind beauty. Finally, we explain how aesthetic emotions can involve indirect perception of God via the natural sign of natural beauty.
79. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 32 > Issue: 3
Daniel Speak, Domination and the Free Will Defense: A Reply to Pruss
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Few arguments have enjoyed as strong a reputation for philosophical success as Alvin Plantinga’s free will defense (FWD). Despite the striking reputation for decisiveness, however, concerns about the success of the FWD have begun to trickle into the philosophical literature. In a recent article in this journal, Alexander Pruss has contributed to this flow with an intriguing argument that a proposition necessary to the success of Plantinga’s FWD is false. Specifically, Pruss has argued, contrary to the FWD, that, necessarily, God is able to actualize a world containing at least one significantly free creature who never does anything morally wrong. Thus, Pruss purports to demonstrate that it is not possible that every creaturely essence suffers from transworld depravity. Since the possibility of universal transworld depravity is essential to Plantinga’s defense, Pruss concludes that the defense in its Plantingian form ultimately fails. After presenting Pruss’s argument, I argue that the free will defender can resist it, in large part because the free will defender can quite reasonably reject the dominance principle on which the supposed counterexample depends.
80. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 32 > Issue: 3
Myron A. Penner, Personal Anti-Theism and the Meaningful Life Argument
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In a recent paper, Guy Kahane asks whether God’s existence is something we should want to be true. Expanding on some cryptic remarks from Thomas Nagel, Kahane’s informative and wide-ranging piece eventually addresses whether personal anti-theism is justified, where personal anti-theism is the view that God’s existence would make things worse overall for oneself. In what follows, I develop, defend, but ultimately reject the Meaningful Life Argument, according to which if God’s existence precludes the realization of certain goods that seem to an agent to constitute a meaningful life, it is rational for an agent both to believe that personal anti-theism is true and to prefer that God not exist.