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Displaying: 71-80 of 1554 documents


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71. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 31 > Issue: 3
Jeff Speaks, The Method of Perfect Being Theology
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Perfect being theology is the attempt to decide questions about the nature of God by employing the Anselmian formula that God is the greatest possible being. One form of perfect being theology—recently defended by Brian Leftow in God and Necessity—holds that we can decide between incompatible claims that God is F and that God is not F by asking which claim would confer more greatness on God, and then using the formula that God is the greatest possible being to rule out the one which confers less greatness on God. This paper argues that this form of argument, while intuitively quite plausible, does not work.
72. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 31 > Issue: 3
Daniel M. Johnson, Adam C. Pelser, Foundational Beliefs and Persuading with Humor: Reflections Inspired by Reid and Kierkegaard
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The most important and common solution to the Pyrrhonian skeptic’s regress problem is foundationalism. Reason-giving must stop somewhere, argues the foundationalist, and the fact that it does stop (at foundational, basic, non-inferentially justified beliefs) does not threaten knowledge or justification. The foundationalist has a problem, though; while foundationalism might adequately answer skepticism, it does not allow for a satisfying reply to the skeptic. The feature that makes a belief foundationally justified is not the sort of thing that can be given to another as a reason. Thus, if foundationalism is true, we can only fall silent in the face of a challenge to our epistemically basic beliefs. Call this the practical or existential problem of foundationalism. Thomas Reid offers a rather stunning solution to this problem. Humor (“ridicule”), he thinks, can be used to defend basic beliefs which cannot be defended by argument. We develop and defend an account on which Reid is correct and emotions such as rueful amusement can be invoked to rationally persuade the skeptic to accept foundationally justified beliefs. Then, inspired by Kierkegaard, we extend the account to foundational moral and religious beliefs.
73. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 31 > Issue: 3
Travis Dumsday, Divine Hiddenness as Deserved
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The problem of divine hiddenness has become one of the most prominent arguments for atheism in contemporary philosophy of religion. The basic idea: we have good reason to think that God, if He existed, would make Himself known to us such that His existence could not be rationally doubted (or at least He would make Himself known among those who are willing to believe). And since He hasn’t done so, we can be confident that He does not actually exist. One line of response that has received relatively little attention is the argument that God justly refrains from granting us all a rationally indubitable belief in Him because we are unworthy of such belief, and in fact deserve exclusion from communion with God. John Schellenberg dubs this the “Just Deserts Argument.” Here I consider several possible versions of the argument and subject one of them to further development and defense.
74. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 31 > Issue: 3
William Lauinger, The Neutralization of Draper-Style Evidential Arguments from Evil
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This paper aims to neutralize Draper-style evidential arguments from evil by defending five theses: (1) that, when those who advance these arguments use the word “evil,” they are referring, at least in large part, to ill-being; (2) that well-being and ill-being come as a pair (i.e., are essentially related); (3) that well-being and ill-being are best understood in an at least partly objectivist way; (4) that (even partial) objectivism about well-being and ill-being is best understood as implying non-naturalism about well-being and ill-being; and (5) that the truth of non-naturalism about well-being and ill-being does not fit cleanly with naturalism and, in fact, fits at least as well with theism as it does with naturalism.
75. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 31 > Issue: 3
Stefan Goltzberg, Is The Bible Fiction?
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The aim of this paper is to show that the supposed close connection between fiction and false discourse is in fact not strong at all. In wondering whether the Bible is fiction, people quite often tend to think that if you say it is fiction, you imply it is false. In order to argue for our conclusion, Freud’s notion of illusion is analyzed, as well as work by Spinoza and Searle. From the latter, the pragmatic perspective of fiction is borrowed: contrary to the semantic perspective, the pragmatic perspective is independent of the semantic notions of truth and falsity. With the aid of this perspective, the connection between being fiction and falsity is called into question.
book reviews
76. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 31 > Issue: 3
Yishai Cohen, Emotions in the Moral Life, by Robert C. Roberts
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77. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 31 > Issue: 3
Kenneth L. Pearce, The Puzzle of Existence: Why Is There Something Rather Than Nothing?, edited by Tyron Goldschmidt
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78. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 31 > Issue: 3
Kevin Vallier, Understanding Liberal Democracy: Essays in Political Philosophy, by Nicholas Wolterstorff
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79. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 31 > Issue: 3
Kenneth Boyce, Gratuitous Suffering and the Problem of Evil: A Comprehensive Introduction, by Bryan Frances
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80. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 31 > Issue: 3
William Myatt, Theology and Public Philosophy: Four Conversations, edited by Kenneth L. Grasso and Cecilia Rodriguez Castillo
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