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Displaying: 71-80 of 1564 documents


articles
71. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 31 > Issue: 4
Alexander Pruss, Joshua Rasmussen, Time without Creation?
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We introduce three arguments for the thesis that time cannot exist prior to an original creation event. In the first argument, we seek to show that if time doesn’t depend upon creation, then time is infinite in the backwards direction, which is incompatible with arguments for a finite past. In the second and third arguments, we allow for the possibility of backwards-infinite time but argue that God could not have a sufficiently good reason to refrain from creating for infinitely many moments—either in a world void of created things (argument two) or in the actual world prior to creation (argument three). Our end goal is to help clarify connections between time and divine action.
72. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 31 > Issue: 4
John Russell Roberts, Axiarchism and Selectors
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This essay offers a defense of Axiarchism’s answer to the question, “Why does the world exist?” against prominent objections leveled against it by Derek Parfit. Parfit rejects the Axiarchist answer while abstracting from it his own Selector strategy. I argue that the abstraction fails, and that even if we were to regard Axiarchism as an instance of a Selector hypothesis, we should regard it as the only viable one. I also argue that Parfit’s abstraction leads him to mistake the nature and, thereby, the force of Axiarchism’s claim to being an ultimate explanation. Finally, I defend the Axiarchist’s claim that the good could not fail to rule.
73. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 31 > Issue: 4
Peter Furlong, Is God the Cause of Sin?: An Examination of the Unadorned Privation Defense
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In this paper I will investigate one way of resolving the apparent tension between the following three propositions, endorsed by some theists: (1) Every worldly event is a consequence guaranteed by God’s unimpedible causal activity, (2) People sin, (3) God is not the cause of sin. In particular, I will examine what I will call the unadorned privation defense, which has roots in Aquinas and continues to find defenders. I will argue that although defenders of this view successfully rebut certain criticisms, their defense ultimately fails to reconcile these three propositions.
74. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 31 > Issue: 4
Brian Leftow, On God and Necessity
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My God and Necessity offers a theist a theory of modal truth. Two recent articles criticize the theory’s motivation and main features. I reply to these criticisms.
75. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 31 > Issue: 4
Noël B. Saenz, Against Divine Truthmaker Simplicity
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Divine Simplicity has it that God is absolutely simple. God exhibits no metaphysical complexity; he has neither proper parts nor distinct intrinsic properties. Recently, Jeffrey Brower has put forward an account of divine simplicity that has it that God is the truthmaker for all intrinsic essential predications about him. This allows Brower to preserve the intuitive thought that God is not a property but a concrete being. In this paper, I provide two objections to Brower’s account that are meant to show that whatever merits this account of divine simplicity has, plausibility is not one of them.
76. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 31 > Issue: 4
Johannes Grössl, Leigh Vicens, Closing the Door on Limited-Risk Open Theism
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This paper argues against a version of open theism defended by Gregory Boyd, which we call “limited risk,” according to which God could guarantee at creation at least the fulfillment of His most central purpose for the world: that of having a “people for himself.” We show that such a view depends on the assumption that free human decisions can be “statistically determined” within certain percentage ranges, and that this assumption is inconsistent with open theists’ commitment to a libertarian conception of human freedom.
reviews
77. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 31 > Issue: 4
Julie Walsh, The Divine Order, the Human Order, and the Order of Nature: Historical Perspectives, edited by Eric Watkins
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78. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 31 > Issue: 4
Brian Hebblethwaite, Solved by Sacrifice: Austin Farrer, Fideism, and the Evidence of Faith, by Robert MacSwain
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79. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 31 > Issue: 4
James Bryson, Philosophical Religions from Plato to Spinoza: Reason, Religion, and Autonomy, by Carlos Fraenkel
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articles
80. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 31 > Issue: 3
Gordon Graham, Aesthetics and Sacred Music
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This paper aims to show how philosophical debates about the nature of music as an art can throw light on one of the problems raised by Plato’s Euthryphro—how can human beings serve the gods?—and applies this to the use of music in worship. The paper gives a broad overview of expressivist, representationalist and formalist philosophies of music. Drawing in part on Hanslick, Nietzsche and Schleiermacher, it argues that formalism as a philosophy of sacred music can generate an answer to Plato’s problem.