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book reviews

61. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 47 > Issue: 1
Walter Gulick

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62. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 47 > Issue: 1
Phil Mullins

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63. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 46 > Issue: 3

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64. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 46 > Issue: 3

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65. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 46 > Issue: 3
David James Stewart

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essay

66. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 46 > Issue: 3
Gus Breytspraak, Phil Mullins

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The Ford Foundation funded not only the important 1965 and 1966 Bowdoin College interdisciplinary conferences of the Study Group on Foundations of Cultural Unity (SGFCU), but also the many later conferences from 1967-1972 of the SGFCU successor group, the Study Group for the Unity of Knowledge (SGUK). Michael Polanyi chaired the group making these grant proposals and his cultural criticisms and his constructive post-critical philosophical ideas underlay both the SGFCU and the early SGUK programs which Ford generously supported. There is interesting Ford Foundation archival material about these grants and their programs as well as many relevant letters in the Michael Polanyi Papers. This essay focuses on Polanyi’s limited role in three SGUK meet­ings and its decisive importance in shaping late Polanyi publications. It also traces the declining Polanyi’s aspiration to work with Marjorie Grene to convene a never realized European SGUK conference (in the early seventies) that used his ideas to illumine the destruction of Europe in the twentieth century.
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book reviews

67. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 46 > Issue: 3
Jonathan Reibsamen

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68. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 46 > Issue: 3
C. P. Goodman

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69. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 46 > Issue: 3
Kyle Takaki

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70. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 46 > Issue: 3
John V. Apczynski

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71. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 46 > Issue: 3
Jon Fennell

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journal and society information

72. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 46 > Issue: 2

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73. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 46 > Issue: 2

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74. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 46 > Issue: 2
Paul Lewis

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75. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 46 > Issue: 2

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focus on michael polanyi’s “what to believe”

76. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 46 > Issue: 2
Phil Mullins

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This essay contextualizes Polanyi’s 1947 talk, “What to Believe.” After reviewing connections that probably led to Polanyi’s invitation to make this presentation at the Student Christian Movement conference in Manchester, I comment on Polanyi’s effort to compare the connection between understanding, believing and belonging in science, Christianity and “civic morality.” The main ideas in this talk should be viewed in relation to other writing from the mid-forties to the early fifties when Polanyi begins to develop his “fiduciary” philosophy as an alternative to what he views as the excessively skeptical disposition of the modern mind.
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77. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 46 > Issue: 2
Michael Polanyi

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“What to Believe” is a brief, hitherto unpublished talk that Michael Polanyi gave at a spring 1947 conference of the Student Christian Movement in Manchester, UK. Polanyi criticizes the way in which modern skepticism undercuts Christianity and what he calls “civic morality” and also promotes a misleading account of modern science. Polanyi outlines and compares the ways in which believing and belonging underlie understanding in science, Christianity and “civic morality.”
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78. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 46 > Issue: 2
Gábor István Bíró Orcid-ID

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“What to Believe” is an important, short Polanyi piece that illuminates fiduciary and postcritical elements permeating various parts of his scholarship. This paper explores how Polanyi’s message about understanding, believing, and belonging developed in “What to Believe” fits into Polanyi’s economic liberalism. It discusses its relevance for his views about agents, markets, and the desirable methods of inquiry into the economy, and ends with reflections on the seeds of this new perspective in his earlier economics film project and its influence on Polanyi’s concept of economics.
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79. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 46 > Issue: 2
Marty Folsom

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In this article, Michael Polanyi engages a young audience in a confrontation of worldviews. He is resistant to a form of scientific belief that has defaulted to a naturalism that undermines the human experience of social cohesion. He proposes a return to Christian belief to provide a way toward a better future. But has he given us anything to trust in, other than switching parties with whom to affiliate? Does he actually direct us to consider the contents of “what to believe” or contend that we should believe in the Christian community for better moral outcomes? Is Polanyi’s final goal a deeper investigation of “what to believe” or to create a moral outcome he believes is missing? And is morality the final goal of belief?
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essay

80. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 46 > Issue: 2
Nilanjan Raghunath

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Cryptocurrencies present a disruption to financial institutions, investments, and markets. Should governments therefore allow cryptocurrencies or ban them? How will they affect the flow of money? What form of economic justice should the cryptocurrency market adopt? Who should be involved in the determining of the economic justice? I claim that Michael Polanyi’s theories about employment, money, trade, and his overarching sociotechnical vision of society and the economy can help us understand the current labour market challenges and solutions in view of the digital economy.
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