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Displaying: 61-80 of 92 documents


book reviews and notices
61. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 42 > Issue: 2
Emma Jay Thinking Philosophically
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62. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 42 > Issue: 2
Bede Rundle Wittgenstein and Contemporary Philosophy of Mind
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63. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 42 > Issue: 2
G. R. Evans Gregory of Tours: History and Society in the Sixth Century
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64. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 42 > Issue: 2
Anthony J. Lisska Natural and Divine Law: Reclaiming the Tradition for Christian Ethics
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65. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 42 > Issue: 2
Salvador Piá Tarazona Antropología trascendental: Tomo I: La persona humana
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66. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 42 > Issue: 2
Eric Sanday Plato’s Republic: An Introduction
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67. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 42 > Issue: 2
C. Stephen Evans The Politics of Exodus: Kierkegaard’s Ethics of Responsibility
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68. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 42 > Issue: 2
Claudia Card Damaged Identities, Narrative Repair
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69. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 42 > Issue: 2
Matthew D. Mendham Notices
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70. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 42 > Issue: 2
Books Received
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articles
71. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 42 > Issue: 1
Presenting Our Authors
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72. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 42 > Issue: 1
David M. Holley Self-Interest and Integrity
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Philosophical discussions of the conflict between morality and self-interest typically proceed on the assumption that we have a relatively unproblematic understanding of self-interest. That assumption can be challenged by asking how to relate acts of self-interest and acts of integrity. I argue that when we are talking about motivations, it is better to keep the motivation of self-interest distinct from the motivation of integrity. But the term “self-interest” can also be used to refer to an end, and acts of integrity may sometimes serve the end of self-interest. Against an identity-independent conception of interests (which gives to acts of integrity a possible instrumental value in achieving some interests), I argue in favor of an identity-dependent conception of interests that makes interests relative to the evaluative perspective of someone with a particular identity that acts of integrity help to preserve.
73. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 42 > Issue: 1
Julie R. Klein Memory and the Extension of Thinking in Descartes’s Regulae
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This article discusses the impact of Descartes’s substance-dualism on his account of discursive reason. Taking the presentation of deduction in the Rules as a paradigmatic case of thought’s extension and movement in time, I analyze the relation between intuitive and discursive understanding and that between intellect and imagination. I focus specifically on the mediation of corporeal impressions and of intellectual ideas by ingenium. As intellectual, ingenium is a faculty of understanding; as joining with phantasia, ingenium has access to corporeal affections, images, and memory. Deduction involves both of these aspects of ingenium, and Descartes’s dualism complicates efforts to clarify the operations and nature of ingenium. Thus the dynamics of dualistic psychology account for some of the limitations of deduction in particular and discursive rationality in general.
74. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 42 > Issue: 1
Andrew W. Lamb No Longer the Cave of History: Knowing the Universal in Context
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This essay argues against David Carr’s relativism by clarifying the in principle requirements appropriate to non-relative truths and showing that de facto differences of conceptual frameworks threaten none of them. Non-relative truths are not threatened by history. This defense of non-relative truth belongs to a larger defense of Husserlian “science” that shows how essences, even those “delivered” by history, have a universal (non-relative) “governance” and can be affirmed in nonrelative truths-as such science requires. If history also allows the other qualities of Husserlian science to obtain, then, the essay concludes, such science can exist even as a “situated science.”
75. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 42 > Issue: 1
Stephen Theron The Interdependence of Semantics, Logic, and Metaphysics as Exemplified in the Aristotelian Tradition
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A general metaphysical account of logic, meaning, and reference that developed from the Greeks through the medievals and up into modem times can be called Aristotelian. “Copernican” claims (Kant, Frege), radically to replace this paradigm as quasi-“Ptolemaic,” actually participated in the prolonged decline of scholasticism, after Aquinas in particular. We need to recognize, or to remember, thepriority of being to truth and not to conflate them. We need to explicate the origin of thinking (abstraction) as at one remove from immediate sense-experience. Syllogistic logic then emerges as a true causal account of reasoning in general; it is not some primitive attempt to outline a formal logical system. An account of suppositio as controlling the analogous uses of our finite store of words in reference to an infinite reality itself shaped by criss-cross patterns of likenesses, governs the general picture supplied here.
76. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 42 > Issue: 1
Qingjie James Wang Genealogical Self and a Confucian Way of Self-Making
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This paper is a discussion of three approaches popular in contemporary studies of Confucianism for understanding the relationship between the self and others. I argue that all three of the influential conceptions of self that are prominent in these accounts (the “universal self,” the “organic self,” and the “relational self”) still stand in the shadow of the Indo-European metaphysical traditions of self or are insufficient for going beyond that shadow. Based on the ways in which Chinese characters are generated “genealogically,” I propose an alternative understanding of the Confucian conception of self as a “genealogical self.” Finally, I shall show how this genealogical conception of self leads us to understand Confucian ethics as exemplary and communal rather than absolutely individualistic and normative.
book reviews and notices
77. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 42 > Issue: 1
Meredith Williams A Theory of Sentience
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78. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 42 > Issue: 1
A. E. Pitson Themes in Hume: The Self, The Will, Religion
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79. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 42 > Issue: 1
Oliva Blanchette The Idealist Illusion and Other Essays
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80. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 42 > Issue: 1
A. D. M. Walker Plato and his Predecessors
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