Already a subscriber? - Login here
Not yet a subscriber? - Subscribe here

Displaying: 61-70 of 376 documents


book reviews
61. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 14 > Issue: 1
Marion Hourdequin Gillian Barker. Beyond Biofatalism: Human Nature for An Evolving World
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
62. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 14 > Issue: 1
Emily Ray Michael Marder. Grafts: Writings on Plants
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
63. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 14 > Issue: 1
Joshua August Skorburg Chris Abel. The Extended Self: Architecture, Memes and Minds
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
64. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 14 > Issue: 1
Tess Varner Romand Coles. Visionary Pragmatism: Radical and Ecological Democracy in Neoliberal Times
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
65. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 14 > Issue: 1
Sarah Warren Donna J. Haraway. Staying with the Trouble: Making Kin in the Chthulucene
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
66. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 14 > Issue: 1
Call for Papers: Special Issue of Environmental Philosophy In Memory of W. S. K. “Scott” Cameron
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
articles
67. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Byron Williston The Sublime Anthropocene
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
In the Anthropocene, humanity has been forced to a self-critical reflection on its place in the natural order. A neglected tool for understanding this is the sublime. Sublime experience opens us up to encounters with ‘formless’ nature at the same time as we recognize the inevitability of imprinting our purposes on nature. In other words, it is constituted by just the sort of self-critical stance towards our place in nature that I identify as the hallmark of the Anthropocene ‘collision’ between human and earth histories.
68. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
David Maggs, John Robinson Recalibrating the Anthropocene: Sustainability in an Imaginary World
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Geologically speaking, the Anthropocene marks the end of the Holocene period, a time of great planetary stability. Conceptually speaking, the Anthropocene marks the end of the Modernist period, a time of great epistemic stability. As scientific framings of sustainability strain under anthro­pocenic realities, reconceptualizing sustainability may be necessary. By positioning human/nature relations beyond Modernist dichotomies under­pinning scientific discourse, the implications of the Anthropocene shift from methodological to ontological, dislodging sustainability from its traditional scientific foundations. To this, we propose new stability through four interlinked approaches to sustainability’s complex challenges, offering a framework for thought and action beyond Modernist framings of sustainability and opening essential roles to often-marginalized interpretive social sciences and humanities.
69. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Vincent Blok Biomimicry and the Materiality of Ecological Technology and Innovation: Toward a Natural Model of Nature
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
In this paper, we reflect on the concept of nature that is presupposed in biomimetic approaches to technology and innovation. Because current practices of biomimicry presuppose a technological model of nature, it is questionable whether its claim of being a more ecosystem friendly approach to technology and innovation is justified. In order to maintain the potentiality of biomimicry as ecological innovation, we explore an alternative to this technological model of nature. To this end, we reflect on the materiality of natural systems and explore a natural model of nature, which is found in the responsive conativity of matter. This natural model of nature enables us to conceptualize biomimicry as conative responsiveness to the conativity of the biosphere.
70. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Jonathan Beever, Nicolae Morar Bioethics and the Challenge of the Ecological Individual
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Questions of individuality are traditionally predicated upon recognizing discrete entities whose behavior can be measured and whose value and agency can be meaningfully ascribed. We consider a series of challenges to the metaphysical concept of individuality as the ground of the self. We argue that an ecological conception of individuality renders ascriptions of autonomy to selves highly improbable. We find conceptual resources in the work of environmental philosopher Arne Naess, whose distinction between shallow and deep responses helps us rethink the notion of individuality and, thus, assess whether the conceptual and normative coherence of human autonomy could, at least partially, be salvaged.