Cover of Dialogue and Universalism
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Displaying: 61-66 of 66 documents


metaphilosophy of civilizations
61. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 14 > Issue: 3/4
Michael Mitias, Abdullah Al-Jasmi Intercultural Dialogue
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Intercultural dialogue is the surest method for the transformation of humankind from as an agglomeration of states into a human community. Any attempt to engage in intercultural dialogue short of this ultimate goal will be superficial and vacuous. Working together toward this goal is an imperative, and it is an imperative because in spite of their diversity human cultures are various expressions of one nature: human nature. Their existence is an indication of the creativity and resourcefulness of this nature. They show how humanity can express itself under different geographical, religious, technological, educational, and historical circumstances. Accordingly their difference cannot be viewed as a sign of weakness but as a sign of strength. Acknowledging this fact should be considered a basis of intercultural dialogue.
on the foundations of universalist ecology
62. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 14 > Issue: 3/4
Krzysztof Szamałek Universalism and Holism in Ecology
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Praxis, especially the daily decisonmaking of political praxis, should, if possible, be accompanied by theoretical reflection. Such reflection helps view matters from a proper distance, separate that what is temporary and short-lived from the endurable and timeless and the unordered, spontaneous and accidental from the systemized, planned and well-probed. A long-year university staffer mainly dealing with the economy of natural resource exploitation, for the past decade I have also been in the fortunate position to work on the political scene as an employee of the Ministry of the Environment.
63. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 14 > Issue: 3/4
Peter Mitias Issues in Establishing Environmental Dialogue
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reflections on wisdom
64. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 14 > Issue: 3/4
John Rensenbrink Wisdom and the Learning Imperative
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The word “wisdom” has a multitude of different meanings. This occurs both in popular language and in academic circles. It has that in common with other words of special significance and grandeur in the many languages of our species—think of “justice”, “peace”, “love”, “beauty”, and “reality”. Consider these various meanings of the word “wisdom”: being wise beyond her years, wise old man, wise guy, wise use, the wisdom of the ancients, conventional wisdom, the wise judge, the wise old crone, the three wise men, and so forth. Wisdom is associated with tradition, cleverness, moral rectitude, contemplation, resignation, wonder, keen insight, ripe old age, the received view, judicious balance, acute foresight, superior understanding, solace in time of trouble, and stoic endurance. The list could go on, but even just this much reveals a riot of meanings—and a great deal of confusion. Many of the things we think of as wisdom seem to be at odds with other things we think of as wisdom, and some seem wide of the mark, if not downright mistaken and wrong.
65. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 14 > Issue: 3/4
Daniel Horace Fernald A Good Man Speaking Wisely: Morality, Rhetoric, and Universalism
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66. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 14 > Issue: 3/4
Our Contributors
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