>> Go to Current Issue

Dialogue and Universalism

Volume 24
The Experience of Animality

Already a subscriber? - Login here
Not yet a subscriber? - Subscribe here

Displaying: 61-80 of 101 documents


i. philosophical problems of the living world
61. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
Marek Łagosz Philosophy of Life. Few Arguments against Euthanasia
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
This paper considers and withstands the ideology of a “good death” (euthanasia). I consider some ontological statements about life and death and also some ethical motivations. In that light I show that legalization of the euthanasia is morally problematical.
62. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
Urszula Czyżewska Planetary Ecosynthesis—Environmental Ethics and Scientific Implications
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
The article examines selected issues of planetary ecosynthesis from both scientific and philosophical perspectives. The main object of the examination is terraforming—a purposeful alteration of a planetary environment to improve the chances of the survival of an indigenous biology or, in the absence of any native life-forms, to allow for the habitation of most, if not all, terrestrial life-forms. Although this process has been lively debated within environmental ethics for many years, it still requires more precise ethical analyses as well as an applicable legislation on the international space policy.
63. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
Serena Cattaruzza, Paolo Tosolini Beyond Stereotypes. Knowledge and Medical Care in the Man-Animal Relationship
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
The possible contribution that the figure of the veterinarian provides to a progressive clarification of the knowledge inherent in the animal subject can be highlighted by an epistemological reflection which throws into relief the distinctive modes of approach and the most suitable curative procedures. At the same time a comparison between such procedures and the methods developed by different contemporary philosophical-scientific sectors, including those of the human sciences, could prove instructive in reporting the junctions and obligatory crossings of common problems.
64. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
Józef Andrzej Stuchliński Conceptual Classifications versus Collections of Objects in Biology
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
In logic the concepts of set and class are understood in two senses: distributively (in set theory) or collectively (in mereology). This paper discusses problems of the usefulness of both the concepts in evolutionary biology, particularly in cross–researches of the biological taxonomy, evolutionism and genetics.
65. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
Andrzej Gecow Steps or Revolutions—Emotions in Biology
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
The development of biology too frequently and inappropriately takes on the character of large revolutions instead of consecutive approximations. Revolution means a change of the basic factors of explanation. It leads to struggle and emotions. Revolutions in science and of political systems have common rules and lead to simplifications. I just point out these simplifications, including the lack of grounds for treating many discoveries as revolutions on given scale. Ordering of the range and the importance of the discoveries from Cuvier, Lamarck and Darwin to genetics and Jablonka, is necessary for the abolition of current simplifications and the unblock of the path to the next approximations.
ii. dialogue
66. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
Vir Singh Universal Dialogue as a Universal Phenomenon
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Universal dialogue serves as a stimulant for discussions leading to definitive social actions. The dialogues which are not universal are irresponsible, retrogressive, and lead only to negative social actions. Mal-dialogue (casual or customary dialogue), lethal dialogue (dialogue with the fury of religious fundamentalism), ecocidal dialogue (favoring economy based on nature’s plunder), and cyber dialogue (confusing dialogue) are opposed to universal dialogue; they all pose a challenge for humanity. Lethal and ecocidal dialogues are extremely dangerous and they have to be effectively opposed. Lethal dialogue can be defied by absorbing the ideas of cultural pluralism. The Gandhian philosophy is important of the issue of dialogue—it is replete with ideas fundamental in reversing the processes of ecocide inherent with globalism (the highest stage of economism) and in restoring ecological balance and ecological integrity. Universal dialogue reflects human’s universal attributes such as altruism, consciousness, responsibility, reasoning, ethics, wisdom, creativity, and justice, and promotes a discussion vital to promote human evolution synchronized with universal evolution.
67. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
Elina B. Minnullina Communicative Grounds of Philosophical Reflection
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
The paper examines communicative grounds of philosophical reflection in the context of post-metaphysical paradigm. It is shown that the characteristic of reflection is the ontologisation of language. Drawing on the basic questions of the linguistic and communicative transformation of metaphysics, such as the subject-object dichotomy replaced with intersubjectivity, and substantive rationality replaced with a formal conception, the author deals primarily with the problem of communicative rationality and intersubjective being-in-the-speech.
68. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
Zhanna Vavilova The Subject in Dialogue: a Visual Semiotic Perspective
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
What does it mean to communicate with visual messages and to convey ideas with the help of images? Is the visual sign capable of substituting the subject when he or she is not present? Can it be relied upon in communication? Can it happen that a gap between the subject’s visual image and identity becomes an insurmountable barrier on the way to understanding? This paper attempts to discover visuality as a weighty addition to the spoken word, to reconsider its role in communication so that it is treated not as a deceptive simulacrum but a representation of the subject in dialogical space, an embodiment of an eternal pure impulse, an aspiration to unfold oneself in front of the other.
69. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
Svetlana Shumakova Circus Art: an Aspect of Cross-Cultural Dialogue
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
The paper examines the problem of cross-cultural interactions; within this context circus art is analyzed. Art, in general, and especially, circus art can be considered as a field of dialogical communication, and as a way of giving new human experiences, spiritual values and worldviews. It is hypothesized that circus art is a complex polyfunctional social and cultural phenomenon which inherits communicative properties of art. It is possible and desired to study circus art in the context of cross-cultural dialogue. The article deals with modern cultural situation, its orientation on cultural dialogism, and displays general factors forming the role of circus art in the cross-cultural interaction.
iii. wisdom. discussion about andrew targowski’s book: harnessing the power of wisdom: from data to wisdom. 2013. new york: nova publishers
70. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
Marek J. Celinski Harnessing the Power of Wisdom Is Not Easy but Necessary, Nonetheless
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
71. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
Bernard T. Han Wisdom. About Harnessing the Power of Wisdom: from Data to Wisdom by Andrew Targowski
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
72. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
Hisanori Kato A Way to Wisdom
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
73. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
Konstantin S. Khroutski From Aristotle’s Wisdom to the Contemporary Integralist Wisdom—2400 Years Later
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
74. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
William McGaughey Civilization and Wisdom
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
75. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
Ashok Kumar Malhotra Harnessing the Power of Wisdom: from Data to Wisdom
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
76. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
David J. Rosner Wisdom, Suffering and the Vulnerability of Life
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
77. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
Jerzy Terpiłowski The Return to Eden or Crash
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
review
78. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
Peeter Müürsepp How Universities Can Help Create a Wiser World? The Urgent Need for an Academic Revolution (Societas: Essays in Political & Cultural Criticism) by Nicholas Maxwell
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
79. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1
Szymon Wróbel Editorial — The Experience of Animality
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
i. the animal ethics and philosophy
80. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1
Jan Hartman Animals Are Good People Too
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
The idea of my article is to challenge traditional ways of confronting animality with humanity. Either in order to define human superiority over animals and construct “man” as an “animal and something much more,” or in order to launch the idea of an animal as being less stupid than it has always been supposed to be, the comparison between humans and animals is concentrated on suppressing animality (in humans as superiors as well as in animals—as wrongly conceived to be “stupid”) and affirming humanity. This is a dialectic interplay of two related concepts of “man” and “beast” petrifying a false vision of common fate of people and animals. This kind of false consciousness makes animals and people badly interdependent. I claim that this mental figure should be overcomeby applying the very category of “being human” to so (far) called “animals.”