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Displaying: 61-70 of 535 documents


special project: political theory and philosophy in a time of mass incarceration, part 1
61. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
Keramet Reiter, The Supermax Prison: A Blunt Means of Control, or a Subtle Form of Violence?
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Supermaxes are technologically advanced prisons designed to keep individuals in long-term solitary confinement, structurally eliminating all physical, human contact for months, years, and sometimes decades at a time. Supermax designers and prison administrators explain that supermax prisons contain “the worst of the worst prisoners”—those too violent and dangerous to live in a general prison population. This article explores and challenges the legally and publicly accepted idea that supermaxes control violence. Drawing on interviews with and the writings of former supermax prisoners, I document the often-invisible ways supermax prisoners experience violence. I argue supermaxes should be viewed not just as tools of violence control, but as tools of violence production. Supermaxes are a novel and uniquely modern form of state violence, and their legal and ethical implications should be reconsidered.
review essay
62. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
Gail M. Presbey, Portrait of a Contemporary American Revolutionary: Grace Lee Boggs
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book reviews
63. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
Mark Balawender, Workers and Intellectuals: The Case of Solidarity
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64. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
Anna Carastathis, Fortunes of Fraser
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65. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
Margaret A. McLaren, And Justice for All?
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66. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
Sarah Tyson, Fomenting the Revolution Underway
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67. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
Contributors
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68. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 17 > Issue: 1
Harry van der Linden, A Note from the Editor
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69. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 17 > Issue: 1
Tommy J. Curry, Richard A. Jones, The Black Radical Tradition as an Inspiration for Organizing the Themes of Radical Philosophy: Guest Editors' Introduction
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radical ethics
70. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 17 > Issue: 1
Tim R. Johnston, Being Radically Polite: Caring for Our Fractured Discourse
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There is little doubt that our political discourse has become more polarized over the last thirty years. I argue that as radical thinkers we can turn to politeness as one way to begin working past this partisan and adversarial atmosphere. I define politeness as a self-conscious appreciation of the role of social convention in repairing and maintaining our relationships. The first section compares politeness and decency to highlight what is unique about politeness. The second section argues that politeness can be considered a form of care. The third and final section describes how radical theory can use politeness to start initiating healthier dialogue.