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Displaying: 51-60 of 2893 documents


reviews
51. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 4
Alan Reynolds Philosophy, Politics, and Economics: An Anthology, edited by Jonathan Anomaly, Geoffrey Brennan, Michael Munger, and Geoffrey Sayre-McCord
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52. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 4
Clint Tibbs Ultimate Questions: Thinking About Philosophy, 3rd edition, by Nils Ch. Rauhut
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53. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 4
Sarah E. Vitale The Problems of Contemporary Philosophy: A Critical Guide for the Unaffiliated, by Paul Livingston and Andrew Cutrofello
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54. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 4
John Philip Waterman The Philosophy of Cognitive Science, by M. J. Cain
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55. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 4
Timothy Yenter Philosophy’s Artful Conversation, by D. N. Rodowick
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56. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 4
Index to Volume 39
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articles
57. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 3
Heidi Gauder, Fred W. Jenkins The Research Skills of Undergraduate Philosophy Majors: Teaching Information Literacy
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This article presents a case study of how one school introduced a one-credit course for philosophy majors focused on effective searching for and critical evaluation of primary and secondary sources. The course curriculum is based on departmental learning outcomes, and is also aligned with the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) standards.
58. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 3
Dan Lowe Remembrance of Philosophy Classes Past: Why Cognitive Science Suggests that a Brief Recap Is the Best Way to Start Each Class Day
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In the past few decades there has been rapid progress in cognitive science with respect to how people learn. Indeed, it can be difficult to keep up with all of the recent findings, and it is sometimes unclear how these findings should influence day-to-day teaching in the philosophy classroom. But one simple way to use the insights of cognitive science in the philosophy classroom is to begin each class with a five-minute recap of the previous few lessons. Cognitive science suggests that such a practice can greatly aid student learning by increasing retention of material and skills. I explain why teachers of philosophy ought to take the time to do such a recap by outlining some recent and surprising findings in the science of how people learn, and put forward concrete suggestions for making such a recap as effective as possible.
59. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 3
M. Gregory Oakes Understanding Understanding: How to Think and Write Clearly
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Drawing on the basic philosophy of mind of the modern period, I offer a means of improving clarity of student written thought. Clarity of thought entails the sort of concept-sensation synthesis central to Kant’s account of human experience: or in more recent terminology, to be clear is to recognize the intention of a concept in a member of its extension. Simple analysis of concepts and of the mental state of understanding reveals structures that can help diagnose and repair conceptual weakness. I describe my means of teaching this method in an introduction to philosophy course.
60. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 3
Jake Wright Restricting Mobile Device Use in Introductory Philosophy Classrooms
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A restricted-use mobile device policy for introductory philosophy classrooms is presented and defended. The policy allows students to use devices only during open periods announced by the professor and is based on recent empirical findings on the effects of in-class mobile device use. These results suggest devices are generally detrimental to student learning, though they have targeted benefits for specific tasks. The policy is defended via a discussion of the ethical considerations surrounding device use, a discussion of the policy’s benefits, and responses to potential objections. Avenues for future research are suggested at the conclusion of the discussion.