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Displaying: 51-60 of 2785 documents


reviews
51. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 38 > Issue: 1
Kiki Berk, Doing Philosophy: A Practical Guide for Students, 2nd edition, by Clare Saunders, David Mossley, George MacDonald Ross, and Danielle Lamb, with Julie Closs
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52. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 38 > Issue: 1
John Paul Dreher, Plato for Everyone, by Aviezer Tucker
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53. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 38 > Issue: 1
Raja Halwani, Mirror, Mirror: The Uses and Abuses of Self-Love, by Simon Blackburn
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54. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 38 > Issue: 1
Andrew B. Johnson, Consequentialism and Environmental Ethics, edited by Avram Hiller, Ramona Ilea, and Leonard Kahn
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55. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 38 > Issue: 1
Amy Lara, Consuming Choices: Ethics in a Global Consumer Age, by David T. Schwartz
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56. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 38 > Issue: 1
Robert C. Robinson, A Concise Introduction to Logic, 12th edition, by Patrick Hurley
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57. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 38 > Issue: 1
Clint Tibbs, Questions That Matter: An Invitation to Philosophy, edited by L. Miller and Jon Jensen
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58. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 38 > Issue: 1
Robert E. Wood, Hegel, by J. M. Fritzman
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articles
59. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 37 > Issue: 4
Patricia Calton, Teaching Business Ethics as Innovative Problem Solving
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Teaching business ethics offers an opportunity to encourage students to use ethical theory to develop critical thinking skills and to use these skills to practice creative, ethical problem solving that will serve them well in the course of their professional lives. In the first part of this article, I detail how the disciplined use of ethical theory not only develops students’ moral perceptions but also gives them the conceptual tools to engage in detailed, innovative analysis. In the second section of the article, I use Nike’s “green rubber” dilemma to illustrate how students can use ethical theories to construct analyses of business challenges and design innovative solutions that further the interests of diverse stakeholders. In the last section, I describe class exercises and assignments that both model detailed, creative problem solving and direct students to practice these cognitive skills on their own.
60. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 37 > Issue: 4
Wesley D. Cray, Steven G. Brown, Team-Teaching the Atheism-Theism Debate
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In this paper, we discuss a team-taught, debate-style Philosophy of Religion course we designed and taught at The Ohio State University. Rather than tackling the breadth of topics traditionally subsumed under the umbrella of Philosophy of Religion, this course focused exclusively on the nuances of the atheism-theism debate, with the instructors openly identifying as atheist or theist, respectively. After discussing the motivations for designing and teaching such a course, we go on to detail its content and structure. We then examine various challenges and hurdles we faced, as well as some benefits we encountered along the way. Next, we discuss some informal data collected from the students enrolled in the course, some of which suggest some rather surprising outcomes. We conclude with some considerations of the applicability of this style of teaching to other philosophical debates.