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Displaying: 51-60 of 1002 documents


book reviews
51. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 20 > Issue: 1
Kirk Lougheed The Epistemic Significance of Disagreement
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52. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 20 > Issue: 1
Derek McAllister The Epistemology of Disagreement: New Essays
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53. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 20 > Issue: 1
Winfried Löffler Challenges to Moral and Religious Belief: Disagreement and Evolution
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54. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 20 > Issue: 1
Paul Copan The Allure of Gentleness: Defending the Faith in the Manner of Jesus
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55. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 20 > Issue: 1
News and Announcements
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56. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 19 > Issue: 2
Craig Hazen Editor’s Introduction
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articles
57. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 19 > Issue: 2
Vince Vitale Non-Identity Theodicy
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I develop a theodicy (Non-Identity Theodicy) that begins with the recognition that we owe our existence to great and varied evils. I develop two versions of this theodicy, with the result that some version is available to the theist regardless of her assumptions about the existence and nature of free will. My defense of Non-Identity Theodicy is aided by an analogy between divine creation and human procreation. I argue that if one affirms the morality of voluntary human procreation, one should affirm the morality of divine creation; conversely, denying the morality of divine creation commits one to denying the morality of human procreation.
58. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 19 > Issue: 2
Justin J. Daeley Creatio Ex Nihilo: A Solution to the Problem of the Necessity of Creation and Divine Aseity
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A number of theologians have propounded what we will call proposition (P): If God creates from an internal necessity, then God cannot have aseity (i.e., be from himself ). According to (P), there is inconsistency between divine aseity and the idea that God creates from an internal necessity. In this article, however, I develop an argument for the consistency of divine aseity and the idea that God creates from an internal necessity, thus claiming that proposition (P) is false. The argument is founded upon the doctrine of creatio ex nihilo along with two operative principles implied by this doctrine.
59. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 19 > Issue: 2
Michael D. Bertrand, Jack Mulder, Jr Why Christians Should Not Be Kaneans about Freedom
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In this paper we argue that Robert Kane’s theory of free will cannot accommodate the possibility of a sinless individual who faces morally significant choices because a sinless agent cannot voluntarily accord value to an immoral desire, and we argue that Kane’s theory requires this. Since the Jesus of the historic Christian tradition is held to be sinless, we think Christians should reject Kane’s theory because it seems irreconcilable with historic Christian Christology. We consider two objections to our argument and argue that both fail.
60. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 19 > Issue: 2
R. Scott Smith Craig, Anti-Platonism, and Objective Morality
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Though William Lane Craig believes his anti-Platonism is compatible with objective, Christian morality, I argue that it is not. First, I survey the main contours of his nominalism. Second, I discuss how he sees those points in relation to objective, Christian morality. Then, I argue that his view cannot sustain the qualitative aspects of moral virtues or principles, or even human beings. Moreover, Craig’s view loses any connection between those morals and humans, thereby doing great violence to objective, Christian morals. Finally, I sketch two advantages of a Platonic realism in regards to Christian morals.