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Displaying: 51-60 of 177 documents


51. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 18
Samta P. Pandya Saibaba Phenomenon in South Asia and Beyond: Faith Teachers and Sociality
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In this paper I have examined the Saibaba phenomenon which originated in India and now has a global influence. Through fieldwork, I build on the life and works of three faith teachers (gurus) who have contributed to the Sai movement to forward my thesis that sociality and hence tangible social service is an important means to gain legitimacy, social standing and as a response to late modernity. I begin by giving an overview of the Sai phenomena and its peculiarities in terms of syncretism, bricolage and aspects of global proliferation. I then discuss how sociality is a strategy for this genre of faith movement and its implications. Finally I propose that sociality has become a metaphor of Sai sacrality.
52. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 18
Kisor K. Chakrabarti AAtmatattvaviveka (Analysis of the Nature of the Self) An Annotated Translation: The Nature of Destruction
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53. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 17
Theodore L. Kneupper J. Krishnamurti's Critique of Religion
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54. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 17
Payal Doctor Meaning and Metaphor in the Early Nyāya School
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In the Nyāya school of Classical Indian Philosophy, the concept of word meaning is described in detail; however, the theory of metaphor seems to clash with the theory of word meaning. This paper explores the theory of meaning in the early Nyāya theory and whether metaphor is compatible with it. The Nyāya theory of meaning is a 'basis for application' (pravrttinimitta) model: words pick out references because of the conventions and practices of use. Yet, these words can come to refer to something completely different by pushing off its conventional usage and taking on a metaphorical meaning. If the referent is determined on the basis of the properties it possesses, how it is possible that only some properties are applied to a referent in metaphorical cases when, conventionally, a referent must possess all of the properties before the word is applied to it? This paper will investigate three main questions: 1) what is the nature of a referent according to the Nyāya?; 2) what is the mechanism for metaphorical transfer that allow some properties to transfer and not others?; and 3) what are the philosophical implications of the Naiyāyikas understanding of meaning?
55. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 17
Barbara A. Amodio Opening the Temple in the Human Body: The Tantra, Mantra and Yantra of Chakras, Kundalini and Open Parasols
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56. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 17
Linda K. Mackey Gandhi, Socrates and Satyagraha
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57. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 17
Don Habibi Amartya Sen's Defense of Strong Human Rights
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This essay presents a critical analysis of Sen's theory of human rights. I pay particular attention to his attack on Jeremy Bentham's denunciation of natural rights and the charge that preexisting universal rights are without foundation. I begin by providing some context for understanding Sen's approach to the debate about human rights. I then present a brief overview of rights theory and define the important terms, and also present Bentham's understanding of the 'foundational problem' and why he regards it as a dangerous problem. I offer a short overview of the human rights movement that covers its progress since Bentham's time. I then present a critique of Sen's defense of human rights and conclude that Sen's efforts to invalidate Bentham do not succeed. Bentham's contribution to the debate over human rights remains relevant.
58. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 17
David W. Long Philosophical Sketches: Prolegomena to any Future Study of Consciousness
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This cross-disciplinary, cross-cultural paper explores and critiques scientific, philosophical, and psychological concepts of consciousness. It embodies many of the ideas I presented at the First International Conference for the Study of Consciousness Within Science in 1990, a gathering of physicists, neuroscientists, psychologists, and philosophers, all of whom were trying to come to grips with both the experience and the idea of consciousness in their work.
59. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 17
Kisor K. Chakrabarti AAtmatattvaviveka (Analysis of the Nature of the Self) An Annotated Translation: Examination of the Argument from the Effect as Destruction of the Cause
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book review
60. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 17
Chandana Chakrabarti Socio-Religious Essays in Advaita Vedanta
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