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Displaying: 51-60 of 1865 documents


discussion papers
51. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 38 > Issue: 4
Brendan Mahoney Engaging the Sublime without Distance: Environmental Ethics and Aesthetic Experience
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Over the past decade or two, a number of scholars have proposed that the aesthetic experi­ence of the sublime offers a ground on which to build an environmental ethic. Among these scholars, Emily Brady has offered the most sustained and comprehensive analysis of this topic. Her position is firmly grounded in Kant’s aesthetic theory. She (and others) conclude that the experience of the sublime provides a robust aesthetic basis for an environmental ethic; however, Kant’s aesthetic theory presents difficulties for this position insofar as he claims that the experience of the sublime reveals the superiority of humans (via our morality and faculty of reason) over nature. One source of Kant’s anthropocentrism is his concept of “safe distance.” However, drawing on Arnold Berleant’s theory of aesthetic engagement and Thoreau’s account of the sublime in “Ktaadn,” an engaged—or de-distanced—experience of the sublime offers a more solid foundation for an aesthetically grounded environmental ethic.
52. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 38 > Issue: 4
Neall Pogue The Religious Right’s Compassionate Steward and Conservationist: The Lost Philosophies of Pat Robertson
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Current scholars use the anti-environmental rhetoric of Pat Robertson to argue that the politically important religious right movement, which he co-founded and led, has always ignored and/or opposed nature protection efforts. During the movement’s initial years, from the late 1970s to 1989, however, Robertson encouraged eco-friendly philosophies best described as conservation and Christian compassionate stewardship. He publically endorsed these views through publishing, speaking out at politically charged venues, and by ignoring religious right political allies who favored economic growth over environmental protection. During this early period, Robertson was not an anti-environmentalist but instead promoted thoughtful and nuanced eco-friendly philosophies. Furthermore, it is likely that the larger religious right community shared these views. This examination of Robertson’s eco-friendly positions lays a foundation for future scholarship on the religious right’s relationship with environmentalism.
book reviews
53. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 38 > Issue: 4
Steven Fesmire Sustainable Values, Sustainable Change: A Guide to Environmental Decision Making
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54. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 38 > Issue: 4
Bernard Daley Zaleha Religion and Sustainability: Social Movements and the Politics of the Environment
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55. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 38 > Issue: 4
Jeremy Bendik-Keymer Thinking like a Mall: Environmental Philosophy after the End of Nature
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56. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 38 > Issue: 4
Referees 2016
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57. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 38 > Issue: 4
Index for 2016
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58. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 38 > Issue: 3
News and Notes
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features
59. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 38 > Issue: 3
Jame Schaefer Imprudence and Intergenerational Injustice: The Ongoing Vices of Opting for Nuclear Fueled Electricity
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Despite the U.S. government’s failure to isolate from the biosphere the highly radioactive spent fuel that has been accumulating at nuclear power plants for sixty years, some governmental officials, scientists, nuclear industrialists, and environmentalists are urging increased reliance on nuclear-generated electricity as part of the strategy to mitigate global warming. An ethical analysis of their proposal is warranted, and one promising approach is the theologically grounded process of making prudent decisions like those that Thomas Aquinas outlined and explained in the thirteenth century. Following his detailed method of discovering the facts, identifying a justifiable course of action, and commanding its implementation, it can be concluded that adding more nuclear capacity to our nation’s energy mix is imprudent and will produce intergenerational injustice until the isolation of the spent fuel at existing plants is underway and space is assured for the spent fuel removed from new nuclear reactors. The primary motivation for converting from the ongoing national vices of imprudence and intergenerational injustice to a nation characterized by the virtues of prudence and justice is love for others when expressed and demonstrated inclusively.
60. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 38 > Issue: 3
Debra J. Erickson The Case for Casuistry in Environmental Ethics
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Casuistry, or case-based reasoning, should be used in environmental ethics. Casuistry came to prominence during the transition from medieval to modern, when historical circumstances challenged settled moral perspectives. Similarly, environmental ethics arose in response to real-life dilemmas that also challenged existing moral theories. Casuistry’s focus on cases means that it can resolve individual environmental dilemmas without needing to solve every other problem (theoretical or practical) in the field. It is a “taxonomic” form of moral reasoning that operates by analogy to paradigm cases, appeals to authorities in the field, and application of moral rules of thumb. Analogy to just-war reasoning and medical ethics and appeal to ecological reasoning yields four basic principles for environmental casuistry, justice, prudence, diversity, and a presumption toward preservation, and provides guidance in selecting paradigms and sources of authority within the field of environmental ethics.