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Displaying: 51-60 of 1799 documents


discussion papers
51. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 37 > Issue: 2
Toby Svoboda, Geoengineering, Agent-Regret, and the Lesser of Two Evils Argument
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According to the “Lesser of Two Evils Argument,” deployment of solar radiation management (SRM) geoengineering in a climate emergency would be morally justified because it likely would be the best option available. A prominent objection to this argument is that a climate emergency might constitute a genuine moral dilemma in which SRM would be impermissible even if it was the best option. However, while conceiving of a climate emergency as a moral dilemma accounts for some ethical concerns about SRM, it requires the controversial claim that there are genuine moral dilemmas, and it potentially undermines moral action guidance in emergency scenarios. Instead, it is better to conceive of climate emergencies as situations calling for agent-regret. This alternative allows us coherently to hold that SRM may be morally problematic even if it ought to be deployed in some scenario.
52. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 37 > Issue: 2
T. J. Kasperbauer, Naturalizing Sentimentalism for Environmental Ethics
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Jesse Prinz and Shaun Nichols have argued that within metaethics, sentimentalism is the theory that best accords with empirical facts about human moral psychology. Recent findings in experimental moral psychology, they argue, indicate that emotions are psychologically central to our moral concepts. One way of testing the empirical adequacy of sentimentalism is by looking at research on environmental values. A classic problem in environmental ethics is providing an account of the intrinsic value of nonhuman entities, which is often thought to be inconsistent with sentimentalism. However, no supporters of sentimentalist accounts of environmental values have evaluated the empirical adequacy of their claims. The relevant evidence falls under two broad categories: (1) responses to nature itself and (2) moral evaluations of environmental behaviors. The evidence indicates that both valuing and disvaluing nature are ultimately grounded in emotions.
book reviews
53. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 37 > Issue: 2
Philip Cafaro, Daniel Botkin: The Moon in the Nautilus Shell: Discordant Harmonies Reconsidered
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54. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 37 > Issue: 2
Thomas Cheney, Ronald L. Sandler: Food Ethics: The Basics
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55. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 37 > Issue: 2
Frank W. Derringh, Eric Roark: Removing the Commons: A Lockean Left-Libertarian Approach to the Just Use and Appropriation of Natural Resourses
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56. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 37 > Issue: 2
Christopher Groves, Elizabeth Cripps: Climate Change and the Moral Agent: Individual Duties in an Interdependent World
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57. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 37 > Issue: 2
Tony Milligan, Robert Garner: A Theory of Justice for Animals: Rights in a Nonideal World
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58. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 37 > Issue: 2
Andrew J. Spencer, Whitney A Bauman: Religion and Ecology: Developing a Planetary Ethic
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59. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 37 > Issue: 2
Eric Katz, Dale Jamieson: Reason in a Dark Time: Why the Struggle against Climate Change Failed—And What It Means for Our Future
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60. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 37 > Issue: 1
News and Notes
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