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Displaying: 51-60 of 1843 documents


book reviews
51. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 38 > Issue: 2
Roger S. Gottlieb, Anne Frank’s Tree: Nature’s Confrontation with Technology, Domination, and the Holocaust
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52. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 38 > Issue: 2
Lauren Hartzell-Nichols, Philosophy and the Precautionary Principle: Science, Evidence, and Environmental Policy
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53. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 38 > Issue: 2
Ned Hettinger, The Sublime in Modern Philosophy: Aesthetics, Ethics, and Nature
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54. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 38 > Issue: 2
Eric Katz, Naturalness: Is the “Natural” Preferable to the “Artificial”?
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55. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 38 > Issue: 2
Donald A. Brown, Nature’s Trust: An Environmental Law for A New Ecological Age
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56. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 38 > Issue: 2
Robert Streiffer, Personhood, Ethics, and Animal Cognition: Situating Animals in Hare’s Two-Level Utilitarianism
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57. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 38 > Issue: 2
Amy Linch, Engaging Nature: Environmentalism and the Political Theory Canon
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58. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 38 > Issue: 1
News And Notes
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features
59. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 38 > Issue: 1
Mei-Hsiang Lin, Traditional Chinese Confucianism and Taoism and Current Environmental Education
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In an era in which a conflicting relationship exists between humans and nature, ways of solv­ing environmental problems need to be introduced into people’s thinking about what to do, what lifestyle we should accept, and what kind of people we should become to support our environmental protection work using better justifications. Traditional Chinese Confucianism and Taoism can exert a profound ideological, philosophical, and spiritual influence on how people judge the meaning and value of their lives. Regarding how humans face the natural environment and how they perceive the meaning and value of human lives, Chinese Con­fucianists and Taoists who possess profound wisdom and great benevolence have provided unique philosophical views. The philosophical views and thinking of Chinese Confucianism and Taoism provide links to the environmental crises that humans encounter today.
60. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 38 > Issue: 1
David E. Storey, Nietzsche and Ecology Revisited: The Biological Basis of Value
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There has been relatively little debate about Nietzsche’s place in environmental ethics, but the lines of the debate are well marked. He has been viewed as an anthropocentrist by Michael E. Zimmerman, a humanist by Ralph Acampora, a biocentrist and deep ecolo­gist by Max Hallman, a constructivist by Martin Drenthen, and an ecocentrist by Graham Parkes. Nietzsche does provide a theory of intrinsic value and his philosophy of nature is germane to an environmerntal ethic. His philosophical biology grounds his value theory. The secondary literature contains three main claims plaguing the debate about his views. First, commentators tend to ignore or downplay Nietzsche’s biology. Second, his value theory is not adequatey addressed. Third, does Nietzsche’s emphasis on hierarchy enable him to maintain that human life is more valuable than that of other life forms, but that the lower life forms have a different kind of value insofar as they enable and support higher life forms? This view is roughly parallel in many respects to the views of Paul Taylor, David Ray Griffin, and Michael E. Zimmerman.