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Dialogue and Universalism

Volume 15
Sources and New Dreams of Western Wisdom

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Displaying: 51-60 of 90 documents


education of “wise and good people”— nietzsche again?
51. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 15 > Issue: 5/6
Mikołaj Ratajczak Gold Medal Essay, the XIIIth IPO, Warsaw 2005
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52. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 15 > Issue: 5/6
Tomasz Przeździecki Gold Medal Essay, the XIIIth IPO, Warsaw 2005
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53. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 15 > Issue: 5/6
Alexandru Marcoci Gold Medal Essay, the XIIIth IPO, Warsaw 2005
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54. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 15 > Issue: 5/6
Our Contributors
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55. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 15 > Issue: 3/4
Editors Editorial
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towards the second turn: wisdom as human perfection — challenge of feminism
56. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 15 > Issue: 3/4
Dorothea Olkowski The Myth of the Individual
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The fundamental liberal argument supporting the concept of “individualism” is that all individuals possess the same rights and liberties which define each citizen as an individual. Yet each individual somehow remains a person who defines her/himself as separate and distinct from all others and so who should never be considered to be a part of a concretely real group. Such a presupposition entails others. Liberalism presupposes naturalism, that human nature is fixed and knowable, as well as idealism, the belief that rational persuasion and argument are assumed to be the engines of change, and moralism, the idea that nature and reason must also provide some clues for acting. Ultimately, liberalism also implies volunteerism, the idea that social life is comprised of autonomous,intentional, and self-will actions that follow from the rules for right and wrong, which are themselves derived from reason, whose efficacy is natural. This essay argues that when women and other minorities examine the reasonable and rational public political culture, they may find that these very social structures, which are the ones they are most likely to value are also the site of their greatest oppression.
57. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 15 > Issue: 3/4
W. Scott Cameron The Genesis and Justification of Feminist Standpoint Theory in Hegel and Lukács
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Feminist standpoint epistemology suggests that women (or feminists) are cognitively privileged, since gender-specific forms of oppression produce insights systematically denied to men. Yet if many forms of oppression exist, what happens when they overlap? Some reject such theories as irredeemably essentialist, triumphalist, and relativist, but I argue that their original versions in Hegel and Lukács as supplemented by Sabina Lovibond generate both the strongest arguments for standpoint theories and a way through their deepest difficulties.
a renaissance of myth?
58. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 15 > Issue: 3/4
Willis H. Truitt, Galina Iachkina The Destruction of Reason
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It is obvious that scientific knowledge continues its progress in spite of the limitations placed on it by Kuhn’s paradigm theory, and as we have seen, Kuhn admits this progress and seeks to explain it. Scientific discoveries occur almost weekly as we acquire greater and greater knowledge of the world, society, and ourselves. Yet society does not progress; it stagnates and sometimes regresses. Why is it that the vast knowledge we have accumulated is not extended to the improvement of human societies? Why has this humanistic project of the Enlightenment been abandoned?
59. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 15 > Issue: 3/4
Simon Glynn The Logos Mythos Deconstructed
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One implication of Godel’s Proof is that, as Barry Barnes has observed, “For people to operate...rationally they need to have internalized some non-rational commitment to rationality”. In which case “The customary Enlightenment formula, according to which the process of demagification of the world leads necessarily from mythos to logos, seems . . .” Gadamer suggests, “. . . to be a modern prejudice”, or myth. Yet some myths are more useful than others, and therefore it may be on pragmatic grounds that, following Nietzsche’s characterization of “. . . logic and the categories of reason as means to . . . useful falsification . . .” we may wish to resist the abandonment of reason that many take to be the corollary of its deconstruction.
60. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 15 > Issue: 3/4
Peter M. Schuller The Logic of Mythos in Building Civilization
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The suggestion of this paper is that we need again widely to practice and teach “the science of the soul” (rigorous metaphorical action) in order to produce the renaissance required to keep civilization going. A metaphor is not the saying of one thing while meaning another. In fact, metaphor is not limited to speech and writing. The understanding offered here is that, properly understood and employed, metaphor is a powerful and indispensable precision tool for radical improvement in thought. It is a prime guide and cause effecting leaps of mind from one axiomatic train of thought or mind set to a better, higher, and seemingly incommensurable one. It is at once a tool for teaching those insights which founded the civilization and a training regimen for strengthening rational creativity to solve new problems.