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Displaying: 51-60 of 1060 documents


book reviews and books received
51. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 49 > Issue: 1
Julie B. Miller Bo Karen Lee, Sacrifice and Delight in the Mystical Theologies of Anna Maria van Schurman and Madame Jeanne Guyon
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52. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 49 > Issue: 1
Joshua R. McManaway Matthew Levering, The Theology of Augustine: An Introductory Guide to His Most Important Works
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53. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 49 > Issue: 1
Ty Monroe David Vincent Meconi, S.J., ed., Sacred Scripture and Secular Struggles
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54. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 49 > Issue: 1
Bogdan G. Bucur Aristotle Papanikolaou, The Mystical as Political: Democracy and Non-Radical Orthodoxy
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55. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 49 > Issue: 1
Erik Kenyon Joseph Pucci, Augustine’s Virgilian Retreat: Reading the Auctores at Cassiciacum
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56. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 49 > Issue: 1
Ian Clausen Richard Sorabji, Moral Conscience through the Ages: Fifth Century BCE to the Present
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57. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 49 > Issue: 1
Thomas McNulty Calvin L. Troup, ed., Augustine for the Philosophers: The Rhetor of Hippo, the Confessions, and the Continentals
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58. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 49 > Issue: 1
Books Received
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59. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 48 > Issue: 1/2
Jonathan P. Yates A Letter from the Editor
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saint augustine lecture 2016
60. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 48 > Issue: 1/2
Allan D. Fitzgerald, O.S.A. St. Augustine Lecture—2016: Engaging the Gospel of John
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This paper asks what led Augustine to begin his commentary on the Gospel of John, linking that decision to his ongoing efforts to heal the Donatist schism by appealing to the centrality of Jesus Christ, both in his own theological vision and in the message to those who were listening to his sermons on the Gospel of John and on the psalms of ascent. This question is particularly important in the aftermath of the Edict of Unity (405) insofar as he was preaching both to faithful Catholics and to their neighbors who had accepted the legal requirements of leaving the schism behind.