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Displaying: 41-60 of 60 documents


disputed question: is it ever permissible to lie?
41. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 86 > Issue: 1
Christopher Kaczor Can it be Morally Permissible to Assert a Falsehood in Service of a Good Cause?
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This paper examines three arguments that are meant to show that all intentional false assertions are intrinsically evil. The first argument holds that lying is intrinsically evil, all false assertions are lies. The second argument is that all intentional deception is intrinsically evil, and all false assertions are attempteddeceptions. Finally, I explore the argument that false assertions are intrinsically evil because they are a violation of self-unity and unity with the community. Each ofthese arguments, I hold, fails to demonstrate the conclusion which, nevertheless, may be true for other reasons not examined in this paper.
42. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 86 > Issue: 1
Christopher Tollefsen Augustine, Aquinas, and the Absolute Norm Against Lying
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Recent events concerning the guerilla journalism group Live Action created controversy over the morality of lying for a good cause. In that controversy, I defended the absolutist view about lying, the view that lying, understood as assertion contrary to one’s belief, is always wrong. In this essay, I step back from the specifics of the Live Action case to look more closely at what St. Augustine, and St. Thomas Aquinas, had to say in defense of the absolute view. Their approaches, while rather different, are nevertheless, I believe, complementary, and cast light on both practical and principled reasons for thinking that lying is wrong, even for agood cause. In the final section of the paper, I discuss some of the challenges that a further defense of the absolute view would need to meet.
review essay
43. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 86 > Issue: 1
Steven J. Jensen Thomistic Perspectives?: Martin Rhonheimer’s Version of Virtue Ethics
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Martin Rhonheimer’s The Perspective of Morality: Philosophical Foundations of Thomistic Virtue Ethics offers a bold summary of Thomistic virtue ethics, laid upon some not-so-Thomistic foundations, culminating in questionable, perhaps even dangerous, conclusions concerning actions evil in themselves. As anintroduction to ethical thought, the book covers a wide range of topics, including happiness, freedom, the nature of human actions, the moral virtues, conscience, the principles of practical reason, consequentialism, Kantian ethics, and much more. For some of these topics Rhonheimer provides a helpful summary of the ethics of Aquinas, sprinkled with thoughtful reflections for the modern age. For other topics Rhonheimer introduces questionable interpretations and developments of Aquinas, written with obscurity and lack of precision. This article provides some suggested alternatives to Rhonheimer’s account, especially with regard to the origin of the first practical principles.
book reviews
44. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 86 > Issue: 1
M. V. Dougherty The Problem of Negligent Omissions: Medieval Action Theories to the Rescue
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45. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 86 > Issue: 1
Marie I. George Darwin’s Pious Idea: Why the Ultra-Darwinians and Creationists Both Get it Wrong
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46. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 86 > Issue: 1
Trent Dougherty Achieving Knowledge: A Virtue-Theoretic Account of Epistemic Normativity
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47. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 86 > Issue: 1
Andrew M. Haines Reasonable Faith
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48. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 86 > Issue: 1
Jason W. Carter One Book, the Whole Universe: Plato’s Timaeus Today
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49. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 86 > Issue: 1
John Schwenkler Objectivity and the Parochial
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50. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 86 > Issue: 1
Book Received
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