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Displaying: 51-60 of 111 documents


51. Thought and Practice: A Journal of the Philosophical Association of Kenya: Volume > 4 > Issue: 2
Jacinta Mwende Maweu A Critical Assessment of Odera Oruka’s Theory of Punishment
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This paper is a critical examination of Odera Oruka’s theory of punishment in his Punishment and Terrorism in Africa. It argues that although Oruka clearly highlights the weaknesses of the Retributionist and Utilitarian accounts of punishment and therefore calls for the Reformist view of ‘treating both the criminal and society’, he is mistaken in calling for the abolition of punishment simply because it cannot reform the criminal. The paper contends that the reform of the criminal is only one major function of punishment and not the only one, and so we cannot call for its abolition on the basis of this single consideration. The paper further urges that Oruka’s theory of punishment is rather deterministic: according to him, the criminal commits the crime because of the criminal forces which he or she has very little control over, so that he or she cannot be held morally responsible for his or her actions.
52. Thought and Practice: A Journal of the Philosophical Association of Kenya: Volume > 4 > Issue: 2
Gail M. Presbey Kenyan Sages on Equality of the Sexes
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This article traces the larger theme of egalitarianism within the context of equality of the sexes throughout H. Odera Oruka’s interviews with Kenyan sages, whom he asked to share their views on the topic. Often, the sages asserted men’s superiority to women. This paper analyses the sages’ responses, as well as Odera Oruka’s rejoinders to their comments. I have broadened my study to include five sages interviewed by Frederick Ochieng’-Odhiambo, included in his dissertation completed under Odera Oruka’s supervision (1994). I find that the sages’ arguments for women’s inferiority were weak and flawed. Many contemporary Kenyans find fault with views similar to the sages’. The one sage who did elaborate on women’s equality failed to acknowledge that men discourage women from taking action to improve their situation. This article does not reject sage philosophy as an approach to the topic but insists that further study, including women sages, is needed to address the shortcomings of the sage interviews included in Odera Oruka’s Sage Philosophy (1991).
53. Thought and Practice: A Journal of the Philosophical Association of Kenya: Volume > 4 > Issue: 2
Francis E.A. Owakah Race Ideology and the Conceptualization of Philosophy: The Story of Philosophy in Africa from Placide Tempels to Odera Oruka
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Philosophy in Africa has come a long way. From the 18th and 19th centuries when it was totally ignored or denied altogether, to when it was given a lower status by ethnophilosophers. Today we talk proudly of an African philosophy. What is often forgotten is its history and the players behind its historical moments. This paper tells the story of how racial ideology had defined the course of philosophy in Africa. We are particularly concerned with telling the story of Henry Odera Oruka, and how he contributed to raising the status of philosophy in Africa.
54. Thought and Practice: A Journal of the Philosophical Association of Kenya: Volume > 4 > Issue: 2
F. Ochieng-Odhiambo, C. Iteyo Reason and Sagacity in Africa: Odera Oruka’s Contribution to Philosophy
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Commentators on the four trends in contemporary African philosophy as enunciated by H. Odera Oruka frequently focus on the merits and demerits of each trend. However, many of them are obblivious to the way in which sagacity emancipates African philosophy by putting reason in its rightful pivotal position. This article argues that while the professional philosophers accused ethno-philosophers of doing disservice to African philosophy, they too stand accused of the same. This is due to the fact that both ethno-philosophy and professional philosophy function within the Western grid and therefore in the interest and service of theWestern world. Philosophic sagacity, the article argues, discards the undesirable elements of ethno-philosophy and professional philosophy, while retaining desirable ones, namely, the Africanness in ethno-philosophy and the objectivity in professional philosophy. Because philosophic sagacity is African and objective, it is a desired tool of change in Africa. It can, for example, be used to address negative aspects of ethnicity that bedevil Africa. There lies the most important contribution by H. Odera Oruka to philosophy in general and African philosophy in particular.
55. Thought and Practice: A Journal of the Philosophical Association of Kenya: Volume > 4 > Issue: 2
Fayemi Ademola Kazeem H. Odera Oruka and the Question of Methodology in African Philosophy: A Critique
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This paper examines the contribution of Henry Odera Oruka, a Kenyan philosopher, to the discourse on the problem of methodology in African philosophy. It interrogates the veracity of various critical reactions to Oruka’s thesis on philosophic sagacity, as well as his rejoinders to some of them. The paper posits that in spite of the formidable critiques against philosophic sagacity as an approach to African philosophy, there are still some aspects of it worthy of note. In building on the strengths of philosophic sagacity, the paper suggests a transition to the method of ‘hermeneutico-reconstructionism’ in contemporary African philosophy.
56. Thought and Practice: A Journal of the Philosophical Association of Kenya: Volume > 4 > Issue: 2
Chigbo Joseph Ekwealo Contextualizing ‘Philosophic Sagacity’ among the Igbo of South-Eastern Nigeria: An Examination of Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart
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This paper validates Odera Oruka’s assertion that Philosophic Sagacity is a pervasive phenomenon among African peoples. It argues that whereas Oruka mostly focused on the Kenyan social environment in defense of his thesis, his observations are also applicable to African communities outside Kenya’s borders, especially in their precolonial settings, where there were people who interrogated the rationale of their cultures’ beliefs and practices. Towards this end, the paper deploys textual exegesis on Chinua Achebe’s epic novel, Things Fall Apart, set among the Igbo of South-Eastern Nigeria.
57. Thought and Practice: A Journal of the Philosophical Association of Kenya: Volume > 4 > Issue: 2
Reginald M.J. Oduor Odera Oruka’s Account of the Foundation of Human Rights: A Critique
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While H. Odera Oruka is best known for his views on sage philosophy, he spent a considerable portion of his philosophical career agonizing over the question of human rights. The present paper argues that there is need for further philosophical reflection on Oruka’s account of the foundation of human rights with a view to refining it.
58. Thought and Practice: A Journal of the Philosophical Association of Kenya: Volume > 4 > Issue: 1
Reginald M.J. Oduor, Ph.D. Editor’s Note
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59. Thought and Practice: A Journal of the Philosophical Association of Kenya: Volume > 4 > Issue: 1
Reginald M.J. Oduor A Critical Review of D.A. Masolo’s Self and Community in a Changing World
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60. Thought and Practice: A Journal of the Philosophical Association of Kenya: Volume > 4 > Issue: 1
J.O. Famakinwa Revisiting Kwame Gyekye’s Critique of Normative Cultural Relativism
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This article examines Kwame Gyekye’s critique of normative cultural relativism. It argues that the implications of normative cultural relativism mentioned by Gyekye do not necessarily undermine the theory. Nevertheless, the article concedes that the fact that Gyekye’s arguments do not undermine normative cultural relativism does not make the theory itself plausible.