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Displaying: 51-60 of 641 documents


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51. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 20 > Issue: 2
Harry van der Linden Trump, Populism, Fascism, and the Road Ahead
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book reviews
52. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 20 > Issue: 2
Brandon Absher McCarthyism and the Making of American Philosophy
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53. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 20 > Issue: 2
Peter Amato Ethics, Politics, and Social Existence
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54. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 20 > Issue: 2
Yuanfang Dai The Intersection of Chinese Philosophy and Gender
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55. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 20 > Issue: 2
Elisabeth Paquette Engaging Badiou’s Dialectics in Black
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56. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 20 > Issue: 2
Charles Reitz The Critical University as Radical Project
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57. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 20 > Issue: 2
Michael Reno Suffering and the Messianic
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58. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 20 > Issue: 2
Jameliah Shorter-Bourhanou Reimagining the Impossible in Africana Philosophy
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59. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 20 > Issue: 2
Contributors
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60. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 20 > Issue: 1
Andrew T. Lamas Losing Well: Make America Radical Again
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The concept of “losing well” is introduced and defined as radical praxis of the Left that catalyzes social democracy, stimulates critical consciousness, and develops counterformations of solidarity for struggle in the nonrevolutionary situation. Walter Benjamin’s idea of amazement is interpreted as a personal praxis for self-critique and critical awareness. Herbert Marcuse’s conception of the one-dimensional society is interpreted as a society organized for maintaining the nonrevolutionary situation—the “society without opposition.” My own view is that Marcuse was trying to develop a theory of revolution for the nonrevolutionary situation. This is the introductory essay for the second of two special issues of Radical Philosophy Review marking the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary of the publication of one of the twentieth century’s most provocative, subversive, and widely read works of radical theory—Marcuse’s One-Dimensional Man, which we now reassess to contribute to the liberation theories of our time. A summary of each of the articles featured in this special issue is also provided.