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Displaying: 51-60 of 785 documents


book reviews
51. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 38 > Issue: 1
Jacob Alan Cook The Place of Imagination: Wendell Berry and the Poetics of Community, Affection, and Identity
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52. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 38 > Issue: 1
Wonchul Shin Methodist Morals: Social Principles in the Public Church’s Witness
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53. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 38 > Issue: 1
Matthew R. Petrusek The Seductiveness of Virtue: Abraham Joshua Heschel and John Paul II on Morality and Personal Fulfillment
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54. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 38 > Issue: 1
Virginia W. Landgraf Transformed Lives: Making Sense of Atonement Today
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55. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 38 > Issue: 1
Thomas O’Brien Not by Nature but by Grace: Forming Families through Adoption
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56. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 38 > Issue: 1
Elisabeth Rain Kincaid On Secular Governance: Lutheran Perspectives on Contemporary Legal Issues
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57. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 38 > Issue: 1
Ramon Luzarraga Just Revolution: A Christian Ethic of Political Resistance and Social Transformation
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58. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 38 > Issue: 1
Dolores L. Christie Ethics and the Elderly: The Challenge of Long-Term Care; Loving Later Life: An Ethics of Aging
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59. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 37 > Issue: 2
Scott Paeth, Kevin Carnahan Preface
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selected essays
60. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 37 > Issue: 2
Cristina L. H. Traina “This Is the Year”: Narratives of Structural Evil
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The 2016 American presidential campaign raised awareness of structural evil among segments of the population whose privilege has protected this knowledge, both making them self-conscious of their vulnerability as persons and revealing the role that the liberal narrative of progress has played in establishing and perpetuating structural evil. This moment of opportunity to shift both the political and the theological narrative demands liberal conversion: overcoming the temptations of anger, denial, and paralysis to embrace solidarity in vulnerability and power. An early liberationist narrative that embraces utopian praxis rather than utopian ideology is both more theologically honest and more effective than the liberal narrative of progress.