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Displaying: 41-50 of 2801 documents


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41. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 38 > Issue: 3
Debra Jackson, Intellectual Empathy: Critical Thinking for Social Justice, by Maureen Linker
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42. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 38 > Issue: 3
Joseph John, Portraits of American Philosophy, ed. Steven M. Cahn
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43. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 38 > Issue: 3
Jeff Kasser, The Problem of Evil, by Daniel Speak
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44. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 38 > Issue: 3
Andrew Kissel, Free: Why Science Hasn’t Disproved Free Will, by Alfred R. Mele
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45. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 38 > Issue: 3
Dennis Knepp, Philosophy Through Teaching, ed. Emily Esch, Kevin Hermberg, Rory E. Kraft, Jr.
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46. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 38 > Issue: 3
Janet M. Levin, Consciousness, by Josh Weisberg
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47. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 38 > Issue: 3
Michael T. McFall, The Outrageous Idea of the Missional Professor, by Paul M. Gould
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48. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 38 > Issue: 3
Announcement of the Arnold Wilson Prize Essay Competition
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articles
49. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 38 > Issue: 2
Sarah Cashmore, Changing Values in Teaching and Learning Philosophy: A Comparison of Historical and Current Educational Approaches
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This paper examines the pedagogical values inherent in various traditions of philosophy education, from the ancient Greeks to current practices in Ontario high schools, and asks whether our current educational practices are imparting the philosophical values we wish to bestow upon our learners. I compare the approaches of Socrates, Descartes, and Dewey on the nature of philosophy and the pedagogical frameworks they defend for transmitting the “spirit” of philosophy, and then examine the Ontario curriculum guidelines for the teaching of philosophy. In past philosophical traditions, dynamic growth, free questioning, and social responsibility are considered essential to the practice of philosophy. Certain factors in today’s educational institutions limit students’ abilities to achieve those values, although the appeal to these values is the same. I end with recommendations for amendments to the Ontario curriculum expectations that would help put the philosophical development of the individual student more clearly at the centre of these guidelines.
50. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 38 > Issue: 2
Alexandra Bradner, How to Teach Philosophy of Science
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Philosophy of science is a challenging course to teach. This paper offers suggestions for early-, middle- and late-career professors who teach philosophy of science at the undergraduate or graduate level. The advantages and disadvantages of four different course designs are discussed, and a list of possible syllabus topics is presented. The paper encourages a thoroughgoing approach to inclusive pedagogy: it recommends that we look for ways to highlight a range of underrepresented voices throughout the semester, instead of tacking on one or two feminist readings at the end of a course. The author reports success with two forms of student assessment, in particular: a peer participation grade and a series of short critical response papers. Also covered are learning goals, textbook selection, and faculty assessment.